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Author Topic: [English] Sensitivity through Generosity - by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu  (Read 4041 times)

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Offline Johann

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Dhammatalk:
Sensitivity through Generosity
 

by Bhikkhu Thanissaro (23.12.2013)
~ 10min



Diverse Talks and a possibility for transcribing and also for translating into German you might find here:Thanissaro Bhikkhu - Dhamma Talk Archive

 *sgift*

Download: http://sangham.net/index.php?action=tpmod;dl=item154
« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 08:48:34 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

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Sadhu!

It always a joy to hear people who have an unterstanding in words and meanings of the whole thing.

 _/\_  _/\_  _/\_
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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Transcription/Niederschrift:

 *sgift*

I was talking recently to someone who had given a gift to a lay-run meditation center last year. He came back this year to find that it disappeared. When he asked the people at the center about this they said: "Well, that's impermanence."

Which is not the Dharma of the Buddha.

There is a danger in trying to boil everything down to just a few principles. Like the idea that all the Dharma teachings come down to the three characteristics: "You just have to accept that things are impermanent, stressful and non-self, just let go at that.

The Buddha didn't teach that way. That was a particular teaching to be applied in particular circumstances. And there are much larger frameworks which include a much larger picture, it means he actually taught Dharma and Vinaya. We tend to forget that.

And the Vinaya's not just rules, but protocols, patterns for behaviour. And it's through the Vinaya that you get a sense of how to apply some of the more abstract principles. How the Buddha would apply them in specific situations. And a lot of the protocols have to do with learning how to look after the people around you, learning how to look afer the things around you. This is an important part of the practice. One of the ways of being unburdensome is that, when someone gives you a gift, you take good care of it, so that it stays around, and people can get a lot of use out of it. Don't have to keep giving it again and again and again.

So even though it may seem that we are attached to our things, because we take such careful care of them, it's actually a principle of the Dharma. Which is being unburdensome. It's in that list that the Buddha gives to Gotami. And there are other protocols for how to help other people, how to look after people who are sick, how sick people should behave, so they're not a burden on the people looking after them. How teachers should look after their students, how students should look after their teachers. It's a very well-rounded training.

And I remember something about Ajaan Fuang; that occasionally he would get students that he felt were not really ready yet for meditation. What he'd do would be to get them involved in doing projects around the monastery. The generosity he wanted to teach them was not so much giving of material things but just looking after what needed to be looked after. Running errands, caring for things, cleaning things up.

I myself, when I have dreams of the Ajaans, it almost always follows the same pattern. That Ajaan shows up and I got to do something for them. One time I had a dream with Ajaan Lee. And what it is about Ajaan Lee is when he comes in my dreams he comes with body hurts. He needed some betel nut, so I'd find him a betel nut. With Ajaan Fuang it's washing his robes, boiling the water for his bath. And for some of the more famous Ajaans, they got huge groups of monks in their monasteries, and they go running off and leave a huge mess, and I'm there cleaning it up. It's an interesting pattern. It was part of the training I got, all those years with Ajaan Fuang, I'd be caring for him when he was sick, looking after his hut, looking after things around the monastery. It was an important part of the training. I learnt a lot of Dharma that way.

So when you come here, either as a visitor, or as a more permanent resident, you have to realize, it is not just for the meditation. The meditation is the heart of the practice, for sure. But the heart needs other organs as well. Or you can compare it to the heart wood of a tree. The heart wood, if it doesn't have bark, and soft wood and leaves and branches, is dead. There's a lot of the little things that we tend to overlook. They contribute to the practice. There's willingness to give. If you don't have material things, give of your knowledge, give of your time, give of your energy. You look around for opportunities to give. Don't wait for them to be forced on you. That's the true nature of generosity.

We've got this problem in the West where there are certain events and certain situations where you have to give. You get to invited to a wedding, you've got to send a gift. Christmas cards, you've got to give a gift, lots of gifts. And the little spontaneous acts of generosity, those tend to be forgotten. But those are the ones that really do show a generous spirit. Where you see a lack, and you have the opportunity to fill that lack. That's an important lesson. And it's a way in which we become sensitive to one another. We all become sensitive to one another this way. This is something that's really lacking, especially now, as computers are taking over people's lives. People grow up with computers and don't grow up with people anymore. They're more comfortable looking on a screen. You, we see this all over the world now. It's not just here in America. I was recently in Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia. You see groups of people sitting around, and they are all staring at their little screens. And they're not learning the lessons that come from looking at the people around you, looking at their expressions, listening to their tone of voice, seeing what they are doing and casting around in mind to ask yourself: "What do they need? What are they lacking? Is there something I've got that they could have?"

It's how we reestablish human contact, but we also reestablish a kind of sensitivity within ourselves. Cause there's willingness to on one hand be generous and on the other hand knowing how to look after the gifts that other people do give you, learning how to appreciate them, learning how to care for them, if they are material objects, learning how to be gracious and accepting other people's help. These are the habits that are really helpful as you meditate. Cause it develops sensitivity, and that is what discernment is all about. Sensing things that are not pointed out to you. The Buddha gives you lessons on where to look, and tells you what to look for. But for you to see the actual movements of your own mind you have got to be very sensitive, often in unexpected ways. And that quality of sensitivity is best developed through generosity, through virtue and all the standard parts of the path.

Then reading up on Dharma and Vinaya. The Vinaya is not there just for the monks, as Ajaan Suwat once said. It's there for everybody. That is, when laypeople come and deal with the monks they've got to learn about the monks' Vinaya, to have a sense of what the monks can do and of what the monks can't do. And that way they look for ways of being of help. That sensitizes them to other people's needs. And they start looking at their own needs in a different way. So this principle of generosity is an important foundation for wisdom. Whether it's learning how to be generous, learning how to accept generosity, learning how to take care of other people's generosity. Not just in terms of things, but also in terms of things they do for you. That kind of sensitivity then gets turned into your own sensitivity into yourself, what the mind is doing, what it needs, where and when it needs it. Cause the most satisfying acts of generosity are the ones that are unexpected. You see an unexpected gap and you've discovered in an unexpected way that you've got the means to fill in that gap. That's the talent that you need to be a good meditator.

So all of these aspects, when you think of the teachings the Buddha gave to Gotami, they boil down to three pricniples. One is: What you're aiming at as you go on in life. Two: What you're doing to develop your mind in that direction. And three: How your relationship with other people relates to that as well. Not getting entangled, being unburdensome, learning to be content. These things all interpenetrate. And if you miss one of the dimensions the others are gonna suffer. There we see other people who are just generous and don't meditate, and we see what's lacking there. Or the same problem is there with people who just meditate, and they don't really understand generosity. For the practice to be successful has to be complete. It's an all around practice. That helps you develop an all around sensitivity. So that eventually you can see things you never saw before, and realize things you never realized before and attain things you never attained before. These things really do make a difference.



Translation/Übersetzung
Habe mich kürzlich mit jemandem unterhalten, der ein Geschenk an ein laienbetriebenes Meditationszentrum gegeben hatte. Er am dieses Jahr zurück um zu entdecken, dass es verschwunden war. Als er die Leute in dem Zentrum darüber fragte, sagten sie: "Schau, das ist Vergänglichkeit."

Und das ist nicht das Dharma des Buddha.

Es liegt eine Gefahr darin, alles auf bloß ein paar Prinzipien herunter zu kochen. Wie die Idee, dass alle Dharma-Lehren auf die drei Wesensmerkmale zurück kommen: "Du musst nur akzeptieren, dass Dinge vergänglich, stressvoll und nichtselbst sind, lass einfach davon los."

Der Buddha lehrte nicht in dieser Weise. Das war eine bestimmte Lehre, die in bestimmten Umständen angewandt werden sollte. Und da sind viel größere Rahmen, welche ein viel größeres Bild umfassen. Das heißt, er lehrte in Wirklichkeit Dharma und Vinaya. Wir tendieren dazu, dies zu vergessen.

Und die Vinaya sind nicht bloß Regeln, sondern Protokolle, Muster für das Verhalten. Und es ist durch die Vinaya, dass du einen Sinn dafür bekommst, wie einige der abstrakteren Prinzipien anzuwenden sind. Wie der Buddha sie in spezifischen Situationen anwenden würde. Und viele dieser Protokolle haben damit zu tun, zu lernen, wie du auf die Leute um dich herum acht gibst, zu lernen, wie du auf die Dinge um dich acht gibst. Dies ist ein wichtiger Teil der Praxis. Einer der Wege, nicht zur Last zu fallen, ist, dass, wenn jemand dir ein Geschenk gibt, du gut darauf acht gibst, so dass es da bleibt und Leute viel Nutzen daraus ziehen können. Es nicht wieder und wieder gegeben werden muss.

Selbst wenn es so den Eindruck macht, dass wir an unseren Dingen hängen, weil wir so sorgsam auf sie achten, ist das tatsächlich ein Prinzip des Dharma. Und das ist, keine Last zu sein. Es ist in dieser Liste, die der Buddha Gotami gibt. Und da sind andere Protokolle dafür, wie man anderen Leuten hilft, wie man sich um Leute kümmert, die krank sind, wie Kranke sich verhalten sollten, so dass sie nicht jenen Leuten zur Last fallen, die sich um sie kümmern. Wie Lehrer sich um ihre Schüler kümmern sollten, wie Schüler sich um ihre Lehrer kümmern sollten. Es ist ein sehr gut abgerundetes Training.

Und ich erinnere mich an etwas über Ajaan Fuang. Gelegentlich pflegte er Schüler zu haben, von denen er das Gefühl hatte, dass sie noch nicht wirklich bereit für Meditation waren. Was er dann gewöhnlich tat, war, sie in Projekte um das Kloster zu involvieren. Die Großzügigkeit, die er sie lehren wollte, war nicht so sehr das Geben materieller Dinge, sondern bloß, danach zu sehen, worum sich gekümmert werden müsste. Botengänge erledigen, für Dinge sorgen, Dinge sauber machen.

Ich selbst, wenn ich Träume von den Ajaans habe, dann folgt es fast immer demselben Muster. Dass Ajaan sich zeigt und ich etwas für ihn tun muss. Einmal hatte ich einen Traum mit Ajaan Lee. Und wie das so ist mit Ajaan Lee, wenn er in meinen Träumen erscheint, kommt er mit körperlichen Schmerzen. Er brauchte etwas Betelnüsse, also suchte ich ihm Betelnüsse. Mit Ajaan Fuang ist es das Waschen von Roben, Kochen von Wasser für sein Bad. Und mit einigen der berühmteren Ajaans, sie haben riesige Gruppen von Mönchen in ihren Klöstern, und sie machen sich davon und hinterlassen eine riesiege Unordnung, und ich bin da, um es aufzuräumen. Es ist ein interessantes Muster. Es war Teil des Trainings, das ich erhalten habe, all diese Jahre mit Ajaan Fuang würde ich mich um ihn kümmern, wenn er krank war, nach seiner Hütte sehen, nach seinen Dingen um das Kloster sehen. Es war ein wichtiger Teil des Trainings. Ich lernte viel Dharma in dieser Weise.

Wenn du also hier her kommst, entweder als ein Besucher oder als ein mehr dauerhaft Bleibender, dann musst du dir klar werden, dass es nicht bloß für Meditation ist. Die Meditation ist das Herz der Praxis, sicher. Aber das Herz benötigt auch andere Organe. Oder man kann es mit dem Kernholz eines Baumes vergleichen. Das Kernholz, wenn es keine Rinde und Weichholz und Blätter und Zweige hat, ist tot. Da sind viele von den kleinen Dingen, die wir zu übersehen neigen. Sie tragen zur Praxis bei. Warte nicht darauf, dass sie dir aufgezwungen werden. Das ist die wahre Natur von Großzügigkeit.

Wir haben dieses Problem im Westen, wo es da gewisse Ereignisse und gewisse Situationen gibt, wo du geben musst. Du wirst zu einer Hochzeit eingeladen, und du musst ein Geschenk senden. Weihnachtskarten, du musst ein Geschenk geben, viele Geschenke. Und die kleinen spontanen Akte der Großzügigkeit, die tendieren, vergessen zu werden. Aber das sind diejenigen, die wirklich ein großzügiges Wesen zeigen. Wo du einen Mangel siehst und du die Gelegenheit hast, diesen Mangel auszufüllen. Das ist eine wichtige Lehre. Und es ist ein Weg, in welchem wir empfindsam füreinander werden. Wir alle werden empfindsam füreinander in dieser Weise. Dies ist etwas, das wirklich fehlt, besonders jetzt, wo Computer die Leben der Menschen einnehmen. Leute wachsen mit Computern auf und wachsen nicht mehr mit Leuten auf. Sie fühlen sich komfortabler damit, auf einen Bildschirm zu sehen. Wir sehen das jetzt überall in der Welt. Es ist nicht bloß hier in Amerika. Ich war kürzlich in Thailand, Singapur und Malaysia. Man sieht Gruppen von Leuten herum sitzen, und sie alle starren auf kleine Bildschirme. Und sie lernen nicht die Lehren, die davon kommen, die Leute um sich herum zu betrachten, ihre Gesichtsausdrücke zu beobachten, den Ton ihrer Stimme zu hören, zu sehen, was sie tun, und im Geist zu sinnen und sich zu fragen: "Was brauchen sie? Was fehlt ihnen? Ist da etwas, das ich habe, das sie haben könnten?"

Das ist, wie wir menschlichen Kontakt wiederherstellen, aber wir stellen auch eine Art Empfindsamkeit in uns selbst wieder her. Denn da ist auf der einen Seite Wille zur Hilfsbereitschaft und auf der anderen Seite Wissen, sich um die Dinge zu kümmern, die Menschen einem tatsächlich geben, zu lernen, sie werzuschätzen, zu lernen, auf sie zu achten, wenn es materielle Dinge sind; zu lernen, gutmütig zu sein und anderer Leute Hilfe zu akzeptieren. Dies sind die Gewohnheiten, die wirklich hilfreich sind, während wir meditieren. Weil es Empfindsamkeit entwickelt, und das ist, worum es bei Einsicht im Ganzen geht. Dinge wahrzunehmen, die dir nicht aufgezeigt werden. Der Buddha gibt dir Lehren darüber, wo nachzusehen ist, und sagt dir, wonach du sehen solltest. Aber damit du die tatsächlichen Bewegungen deines eigenen Geistes siehst, musst du sehr empfindsam sein, oft in unerwarteten Weisen. Und diese Qualität der Empfindsamkeit wird am besten durch Großzügigkeit entwickelt, durch Tugend und all die Standardteile des Pfades.

Und über Dharma und Vinaya zu lesen. Die Vinaya ist nicht bloß für die Mönche da, wie Ajaan Suwat einmal sagte. Sie ist für jeden da. Das heißt, wenn Laien kommen und mit Mönchen umgehen, müssen sie über die Vinaya der Mönche lernen, um einen Sinn dafür zu haben, was Mönche tun können und was Mönche nicht tun können. Und in dieser Weise sehen sie nach Wegen, hilfreich zu sein. Das sensibilisiert sie für die Belange anderer. Und sie fangen an, ihre eigenen Nöte in einer anderen Weise zu sehen. Dieses Prinzip der Großzügigkeit ist also eine wichtige Grundlage für Weisheit. Das heißt, zu lernen, wie man großzügig ist, zu lernen, wie man Großzügigkeit annimmt, zu lernen, wie man auf die Großzügigkeit anderer acht gibt. Nicht nur in Dingen, sondern auch in Dingen, die sie für dich tun. Diese Art von Feingefühl verwandelt sich dann in dein eigenes Feingefühl in dich selbst hinein, was der Geist tut, was er benötigt, wo und wann er es benötigt. Denn die zufriedenstellendsten Akte der Großzügigkeit sind diejenigen, die unerwartet sind. Du siehst eine unerwartete Lücke, und du entdeckst auf unerwartete Weise, dass du die Mittel hast, diese Lücke zu füllen. Das ist das Talent, das du benötigst, um ein guter Meditierender zu sein.

Also alle diese Aspekte, wenn du an die Lehren denkst, die Buddha an Gotami gab, sie kommen auf drei Prinzipien zurück. Eins ist: Worauf du zielst, während du im Leben voranschreitest. Zweitens: Was du tust, um deinen Geist in diese Richtung zu entwickeln. Und drittens: Wie deine Beziehungen mit anderen Leute sich ebenso dazu verhalten. Nicht verwickelt zu werden, keine Bürde zu sein, zu lernen, genügsam zu sein. Diese Dinge durchdringen sich alle gegenseitig. Und wenn du eine dieser Dimensionen verfehlst, werden die anderen leiden. Da sehen wir Leute, die nur großzügig sind und nicht meditieren, und wir sehen, was da fehlt. Oder das gleiche Problem ist da mit Leuten, die nur meditieren, und sie verstehen Großzügigkeit nicht wirklich. Denn die Praxis, damit sie erfolgreich ist, muss vollständig sein. Es ist eine Rundum-Praxis. Das hilft dir, ein Rundum-Feingefühl zu entwickeln. So dass du letztendlich Dinge sehen kannst, die du nie zuvor gesehen hast, und Dinge erfahren kannst, die du nie zuvor erfahren hast, und Dinge erreichen kannst, die du nie zuvor erreicht hast. Diese Dinge machen wirklich einen Unterschied.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2015, 09:51:21 AM by Moritz »

Offline Johann

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Was talking recently with someone who had given a gift to a lay-run meditation center last year. He came back this year to find that it disappeared. When he asked the people at the center about this they said: "Well..., that's impermanence."

Which is not the Dharma of the Buddha.

There is a danger in trying to boil everything down to just a few principles. Like the idea that all the Dharma teachings come down to the three characteristics: "You just have to accept that things are impermanent, stressful and non-self, just let it go that."

The Buddha didn't teach that way. That was a particular teaching to be applied in particular circumstances. And there are much larger frameworks which include a much larger picture, it means he actually taught Dharma and Vinaya. We tend to forget that. And the Vinaya's not just rules, but protocols, patterns for behaviour.

And it's through the Vinaya that you get a sense of how to apply some of the more abstract principles. How the Buddha would apply them in specific situations. And a lot of the protocols have to do with learning how to look after the people around you, learning how to look after the things around you. This is an important part of the practice. One of the ways of being unburdensome is that, when someone gives you a gift, you take good care of it, so that it stays around, and people can get a lot of use out of it. Don't have to keep giving it again and again and again.

So even though it may seem that we are attached to our things, because we take such careful care of them, it's actually a principle of the Dharma. Which is about being unburdensome. It's in that list that the Buddha gives to Gotami. And there are other protocols for how to help other people, how to look after people who are sick, how sick people should behave, so they're not burden on the people looking after them. How teachers should look after their students, how students should look after their teachers. It's a very well-rounded training.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 01:53:50 PM by Moritz »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Moritz

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Danke.

:-*

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Transcription/Niederschrift (have not been able to understand these parts from listening / habe diese Teile beim Hören nicht ganz verstanden):

 *sgift*

Iwas talking recently with tosomeone who had given a gift to a lay-run meditation center last year. He came back this year to find that it disappeared. When he asked the people at the center about this they said: "Well, that's impermanence." Which is not the Dharma of the Buddha. There is a danger in trying to boil everything down to just a few principles. Like the idea that all the Dharma teachings come down to the three characteristics: Just have to accept that things are impermanent, stressful and nont-self, just let go of themit go at that. The Buddha didn't teach that way. That was a particular teaching to be applied in particular circumstances. And there are much larger frameworks which include a much larger picture, I mean he(.. ? ..) actually taught Dharma and Vinaya. We tend to forget that. And the Vinaya's not just rules, but protocols, patterns for behaviour. And it's through the Vinaya that you get a sense of how to apply some of the more abstract principles. How the Buddha would apply them in specific situations. And a lot of the protocols have to do with learning how to look after the people around you, learning how to look afer the things around you. This is an important part of the practice. One of the ways of being unburdensome is that, when someone gives you a gift, you take good care of it, so that it stays around, and people can get a lot of use out of it. Don't have to keep giving it again and again and again. So even though it may seem that we are attached to our things, because we take such careful care of them, it's actually a principle of the Dharma. Which is about being unburdensome. It's in that list that the Buddha gives to Gotami. And there are other protocols for how to help other people, how to look after people who are sick, how sick people should behave, so they're not burden on the people looking after them. How teachers should look after their students, how students should look after their teachers. It's a very well-rounded training. And I don't know so much of (.. ? ..) Ajaan Fuang but occasionally get students that he felt were not really ready yet(.. ? ..) for meditation. What he'd do would be to get them involved in doing projects around the monastery. The generosity he wanted to teach them was not so much giving of material things but justto looking after what needed to be looked after. Running errands, caring for things, cleaning things up. I myself, when I have dreams of the Ajaans, it almost always follows the same pattern. That Ajaan shows up and I got to do something for them. One time I had a dream with Ajaan Lee. And what it is (.. ? ..) about Ajaan Lee when he comes in my dreams he comes (.. with body hurts ? ..)with bodyguards. He needed some betel nut, so I'd find him a betel nut. With Ajaan Fuang, it's washing his robes, boiling the water for his bath. And for some of the more famous Ajaans, they got huge groups of monks in their monasteries, and they go running off and leave a huge mess, and I'm there cleaning it up. It's an interesting pattern. It was part of the training I got, in all those years with Ajaan Fuang, I'd be caring for him when he was sick, looking after his hut, looking after things around the monastery. It was an important part of the training. I learnt a lot of Dharma that way. So when you come here, either as a visitor, or as a more permanent resident, you have to realize, it is not just for the meditation. The meditation is the heart of the practice, for sure. But the heart needs other organs as well. Or you can compareit to the heart wood of a tree. The heart wood, if it doesn't have bark, and soft wood and leaves and branches, it's dead. There's a lot of the little things that we tend to overlook. They contribute to the practice. There's willingness to give. If you have material things, give of your knowledge, give of your time, give of your energy. You look around for opportunities to give. Don't wait for them to be forced on you. That's the true nature of generosity. We've got this problem in the West where there are certain events and certain situations where you have to give. You get to invited to a wedding, you've got to send a gift. Christmas cards, you've got to give a gift, lots of gifts. And the little spontaneous acts of generosity, those tend to be forgotten. But those are the ones that really do show a generous spirit. Where you see a lack, and you have the opportunity to fill that lack. That's an important lesson. And it's a way in which we become sensitive to one another. We all become sensitive to one another this way. This is something that's really lacking, especially now, as computers are taking over peoples' lives. People grow up with computers and don't grow up with people anymore. They're more comfortable looking on ata screen. You, we see this all over the world now. It's not just here in America. I was recently in Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia. You see groups of people sitting around, and they are all staring at their little screens. And they're not learning the lessons that come from looking at the people around you, looking at their expressions, looking, listening to their tone of voice, seeing what they are doing and casting around in mind to ask yourself: "What do they need? What are they lacking? Is there something I've got that they could have?" It's how we reestablish human contact, but we also reestablish a kind of sensitivity within ourselves. Cause there's willingness to on one hand be generous, and on the other hand knowing how to look after the gifts that other people do give you, learning how to appreciate them, learning how to care for them, if they are material objects, learning how to be gracious and accepting other people's help. These are the habits that are really helpful as you meditate. Cause it develops sensitivity, and that is what discernment is all about. Sensing things that are not pointed out to you. The Buddha gives you lessons on where to look, and tells you what to look for. But for you to see the actual movements of your own mind you have got to be very sensitive, often in unexpected ways. And that quality of sensitivity is best developed through generosity, through virtue and all the standard parts of the path. And Then reading up on Dharma and Vinaya. The Vinaya is not there just for the monks, as Ajaan Suwat once said. It's there for everybody. That is, when laypeople come and deal with the monks they've got to learn about the monks' Vinaya, to have a sense of what the monks can do and of what the monks can't do. And that way they look for ways of being of help. That sensitizes them to other people's needs. And they start looking at their own needs in a different way. So this principle of generosity is an important foundation of for wisdom. That is Whether it's learning how to be generous, learning how to accept generosity, learning how to take care of other peoples' generosity. Not just in terms of things, but also in terms of things they do for you. That kind of sensitivity then gets turned into your own sensitivity into yourself, what the mind is doing, what it needs, where and when it needs it. Cause the most satisfying acts of generosity are the ones that are unexpected. You see an unexpected gap and you've discovered in an unexpected way that you've got the means to fill in that gap. That's the talent that you need to be a good meditator. So all of these aspects, when you think of the teachings the Buddha gave to Gotami, they boil down to three principles. One is: What you're aiming at as you go on in life. Two: What you're doing to develop your mind in that direction. And three: How your relationship with other people relates to that as well. Not getting entangled, being unburdensome, learning to be content. These things all interpenetrate. And if you miss one of the dimensions, the others are gonna suffer. There we see other people who are just generous and don't meditate, and we see what's lacking there. Or the same problem is there with people who just meditate, and they don't really understand generosity. For the practice to be successful has to be complete. It's an all around practice. That helps you develop an all around sensitivity. So that eventually you can see things you never saw before, and realize things you never realized before and attain things you never attained before. These things really do make a difference.


 _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

Lieber Moritz,
Hab mir erlaubt, einige Dinge auszubessern. Dank Hannes und Dir hab ich wieder viel Freude daran gehabt eine Lehrrede von Bhante Thanissaro zu hören.
Die Version ist nur ein Vorschlag und Du kannst es gern weiter verwenden, wie immer Du möchtest.

 _/\_ _/\_ _/\_
Sophorn
« Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 01:56:02 PM by Moritz »

Offline Johann

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Sadhu! Sophorn, Moritz.

 _/\_

Sadhu, ich hab noch ein paar Dinge angemerkt. Auch wenn Bhante eine sehr klare Sprache hat, ist es machmal nicht leicht. Alleine ginge das sicher nicht leicht. Ich bin immer wieder erstaunt über eure Talente. Ich könnte das nicht. Hier auch noch etwas Senf meinerseits (in blau).

 _/\_

Transcription/Niederschrift (have not been able to understand these parts from listening / habe diese Teile beim Hören nicht ganz verstanden):

 *sgift*

I was talking recently with to someone who had given a gift to a lay-run meditation center last year. He came back this year to find that it disappeared. When he asked the people at the center about this they said: "Well, that's impermanence."

Which is not the Dharma of the Buddha.

There is a danger in trying to boil everything down to just a few principles. Like the idea that all the Dharma teachings come down to the three characteristics: "Just have to accept that things are impermanent, stressful and nont-self, just let go of themit go at that."

The Buddha didn't teach that way. That was a particular teaching to be applied in particular circumstances. And there are much larger frameworks which include a much larger picture, I mean he (.. ? ..) actually taught Dharma and Vinaya. We tend to forget that. And the Vinaya's not just rules, but protocols, patterns for behaviour.

And it's through the Vinaya that you get a sense of how to apply some of the more abstract principles. How the Buddha would apply them in specific situations. And a lot of the protocols have to do with learning how to look after the people around you, learning how to look after the things around you. This is an important part of the practice. One of the ways of being unburdensome is that, when someone gives you a gift, you take good care of it, so that it stays around, and people can get a lot of use out of it. Don't have to keep giving it again and again and again.

So even though it may seem that we are attached to our things, because we take such careful care of them, it's actually a principle of the Dharma. Which is about being unburdensome. It's in that list that the Buddha gives to Gotami. And there are other protocols for how to help other people, how to look after people who are sick, how sick people should behave, so they're not burden on the people looking after them. How teachers should look after their students, how students should look after their teachers. It's a very well-rounded training.

And I don't know so much of I remember some of (.. SCHWIERIG  :) ..) Ajaan Fuang, but occasionally get students that he felt were not really ready yet (.. ? ..) for meditation. What he'd do would be to get them involved in doing projects around the monastery. The generosity he wanted to teach them was not so much giving of material things but just to looking after what needed to be looked after. Running errands, caring for things, cleaning things up.

I myself, when I have dreams of the Ajaans, it almost always follows the same pattern. That Ajaan shows up and I got to do something for them. One time I had a dream with Ajaan Lee. And what it is (.. ? ..) about Ajaan Lee when he comes in my dreams he comes (.. with body hurts ? ..) with bodyguards. He needed some betel nut, so I'd find him a betel nut. With Ajaan Fuang, it's washing his robes, boiling the water for his bath. And for some of the more famous Ajaans, they got huge groups of monks in their monasteries, and they go running off and leave a huge mess, and I'm there cleaning it up.

It's an interesting pattern.

It was part of the training I got, in all those years with Ajaan Fuang, I'd be caring for him when he was sick, looking after his hut, looking after things around the monastery. It was an important part of the training. I learned a lot of Dharma that way.

So when you come here, either as a visitor, or as a more permanent resident, you have to realize, it is not just for the meditation. The meditation is the heart of the practice, for sure. But the heart needs other organs as well. Or you can compareit to the heart wood of a tree. The heart wood, if it doesn't have bark, and soft wood and leaves and branches, it's dead. There's a lot of the little things that we tend to overlook. They contribute to the practice. There's willingness to give. If you have material things, give of your knowledge, give of your time, give of your energy.

You look around for opportunities to give.

Don't wait for them to be forced on you.

That's the true nature of generosity. We've got this problem in the West where there are certain events and certain situations where you have to give. You get to invited to a wedding, you've got to send a gift. Christmas cards, you've got to give a gift, lots of gifts.

And the little spontaneous acts of generosity, those tend to be forgotten. But those are the ones that really do show a generous spirit. Where you see a lack, and you have the opportunity to fill that lack: that's an important lesson. And it's a way in which we become sensitive to one another. We all become sensitive to one another this way. This is something that's really lacking, especially now, as computers are taking over peoples' lives. People grow up with computers and don't grow up with people anymore. They're more comfortable looking on ata screen. You know, you, we see this all over the world now. It's not just here in America. I was recently in Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia. You see groups of people sitting around, and they are all staring at their little screens. And they're not learning the lessons that come from looking at the people around you, looking at their expressions, looking, listening to their tone of voice, seeing what they are doing and casting around in mind to ask yourself: "What do they need? What are they lacking? Is there something I've got that they could have?"

It's how we reestablish human contact, but we also reestablish a kind of sensitivity within ourselves. Cause there's willingness to on one hand be generous, and on the other hand knowing how to look after the gifts that other people do give you, learning how to appreciate them, learning how to care for them, if they are material objects, learning how to be gracious and accepting other people's help. These are the habits that are really helpful as you meditate. Cause it develops sensitivity, and that is what discernment is all about. Sensing things that are not pointed out to you.

The Buddha gives you lessons on where to look, and tells you what to look for. But for you to see the actual movements of your own mind you have got to be very sensitive, often in unexpected ways. And that quality of sensitivity is best developed through generosity, through virtue and all the standard parts of the path. And Then reading up on Dharma and Vinaya. The Vinaya is not there just for the monks, as Ajaan Suwat once said. It's there for everybody. That is, when laypeople come and deal with the monks they've got to learn about the monks' Vinaya, to have a sense of what the monks can do and of what the monks can't do.

And that way they look for ways of being of help. That sensitizes them to other people's needs. And they start looking at their own needs in a different way.

So this principle of generosity is an important foundation of for wisdom. That is Whether it's learning how to be generous, learning how to accept generosity, learning how to take care of other peoples' generosity. Not just in terms of things, but also in terms of things they do for you. That kind of sensitivity then gets turned into your own sensitivity in to yourself, what the mind is doing, what it needs, where and when it needs it. Cause the most satisfying acts of generosity are the ones that are unexpected. You see an unexpected gap and you've discovered in an unexpected way that you've got the means to fill in that gap. That's the talent that you need to be a good meditator.

So all of these aspects, when you think of the teachings the Buddha gave to Gotami, they boil down to three principles. One is: What you're aiming at as you go on in life. Two: What you're doing to develop your mind in that direction. And three: How your relationship with other people relates to that as well. Not getting entangled, being unburdensome, learning to be content.

These things all interpenetrate. And if you miss one of the dimensions, the others are gonna suffer. There we see other people who are just generous and don't meditate, and we see what's lacking there. Or the same problem is there with people who just meditate, and they don't really understand generosity.

For the practice to be successful has to be complete. It's an all around practice. That helps you develop an all around sensitivity. So that eventually you can see things you never saw before, and realize things you never realized before and attain things you never attained before. These things really do make a difference.


 _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

Lieber Moritz,
Hab mir erlaubt, einige Dinge auszubessern. Dank Hannes und Dir hab ich wieder viel Freude daran gehabt eine Lehrrede von Bhante Thanissaro zu hören.
Die Version ist nur ein Vorschlag und Du kannst es gern weiter verwenden, wie immer Du möchtest.

 _/\_ _/\_ _/\_
Sophorn

« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 08:23:15 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

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Ich habe mir erlaubt, dieses in die Liste der unveröffentlichten aufzunehmen. Ich denke, dass vielleicht noch eine Endkorrektur erforderlich ist, wenn sich jemand unabhängig vom ev Veröffentlichen darum bemühen mag, ist dies sicher hilfreich.
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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Zu:

Quote
(.. ? ..) über Ajaan Lee, wenn er in meinen Träumen erscheint ist, er (.. mit körperlichen Schmerzen? ..) kommt. Er brauchte etwas (.. Betelnuss ? ..), also suchte ich ihm (.. eine Betelnuss? ..).

...klingt es zwar wie Upasika Sophorn geschrieben hat, aber aus dem Zusammenhang (Bettlenüsse und was noch dazu gehört, diese Mix, ist in Südostasien die Klosterdroge gegen Schmerzen) würde Attma sagen "körperliche Schmerzen"

"Wie das so ist mit Ajaan Lee..."

* Johann , Attma fällt gerade ein, daß es sicher gut wäre, wenn man die Deutschen Versionen auch ließt und aufnehmen könnte. Jetzt hat Attma doch wie schon öfter an Upasaka Andreas,dhammagermany, gedacht, doch seine Seiten waren schon verschwunden. Das letzte Video ist dies: Buddhismus - Wir bekommen den Hals nicht voll! Buddhismus  , eindeutig, zweideutig eindeutig wo wir sind und was Attma und alle anderen stets wiederholen, wenn Sie wissen was sie reden. Zu-Fälle gibt's. Upss seine email gibts auch nicht mehr. Diese Wertschätzer "sollange es ums eigene geht" dann sind sie dabei, wenn es um Großzügigkeit gehen würde, schwups, weg sind Sie ...  :)
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 05:59:34 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

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Atma hat bemerkt, das der Eingangspost ausgebessert wurde und möchte nachfragen, ob man dies dann so weiter teilen darf/kann.
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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Ja, ich denke, das ist fertig.

Offline Johann

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Sadhu!

Mag werter Upasaka Moritz der Einarbeitung übernehmen/angehen, oder möchte er es überlassen?
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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Ja, ich kann das machen.

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Sadhu!
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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So feinfühlig und großzügig, wie ich gerade bin, fällt mir da gar kein guter Kurzbeschreibungstext dafür ein.

Hier mal was zum Versuch:

Quote
Dieser kurze Vortrag spricht das Thema Großzügigkeit an, was das eigentlich ist und bedeutet, und wie man durch Übung darin lernt, ein Gefühl für die Bedürfnisse anderer zu erhalten.

Quote
This short talk is about generosity, what it actually is and means, and how through practicing it we can learn to get a feel for other people's needs.


Also fortwandern wär mir auch lieber...
Da erzählen die mir was von einem diensteifrigen Brahmanen . Und ich will noch weiter fortwandern, viel viel weiter...

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Johann

October 19, 2017, 02:41:38 PM
Wenn jemand über das Layout des Entwurfes blicken möchte, ob es im eigenen Browser paßt und übersichtlich ist: Wisdom
 

Johann

October 16, 2017, 05:40:03 PM
Sokh chomreoun, Nyom. (Mag sukha sich für Nyom mehren). Thoamada (Dhammada - naturly, gewohnt). At mean ay pisech te (nichts besonders). Klach dukkh, klach sokh (wohl und weh wechseln sich ab). Nyom sokh sabay dea te? Sokh leumom dea te?
 

Marcel

October 16, 2017, 04:13:43 PM
 :-* ehrwürdiger samana johann! wie ist ihr befinden?  :-*
 

Marcel

October 07, 2017, 01:56:00 PM
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Johann

October 07, 2017, 02:48:39 AM
Der Tathagata tut das, wenn man ihn in seinem Dhamma sieht, und dieser, entgegen Personen, kommt auf wenn man ihn nährt, und einmal da, geht er für einen nicht mehr verloren, bleibt Tor zur Todlosigkeit.
 

Marcel

October 06, 2017, 11:37:24 PM
 :-*
 

Marcel

October 06, 2017, 11:36:31 PM
 :-* ehrwürdiger samana johann :-* mögen sie noch lange leben,   für das wohl vieler.... anumodana, ich freue mich sehr! sie decken auf, was vorher verdeckt. so das vijja entstehen kann, und avijja gehen muss!! geht direkt ins herz!
 

Johann

October 06, 2017, 04:19:37 PM
Nyom Marcel.
 

Sophorn

September 28, 2017, 03:51:05 AM
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Johann

September 27, 2017, 12:17:53 PM
Nyom Sophorn, Roben mag man immer geben können. Im Monat nach dem Vassa Ende, ist es für jene Mönche, die den Vassa gehalten haben, möglich und einfacher für den Eigenbedarf Roben anzunehmen.
 

Sophorn

September 27, 2017, 07:01:23 AM
Bhante, ist dann die Robengabe möglich ab dem 5. Okt. bid zum nächsten Vollmond oder darf man auch danach Roben geben? :-*
 

Sophorn

September 27, 2017, 05:44:45 AM
Wie geht es Bhante heute? Haben die Tropfen geholfen?
 ::) :-*
 

Johann

September 05, 2017, 01:21:44 AM
Gerestet: funktioniert tadellos. Nochmal alle Zugangsdaten gemailt, Nyom.
 

Sophorn

September 04, 2017, 02:06:42 PM
Kana hat mit U. Chamroeun das Login mit neuem Passwort erfolglos versucht.
Daraufhin versuchten kana das über die Veränderung über E-mail, aber da erschien, dass die E-mailadresse nicht gültig war (die hatten Bhante auch an kana in der Mail bestätigt)
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Johann

September 04, 2017, 11:52:03 AM
Sollte email im Posteingang haben, Nyom Sophorn.
 

Johann

September 04, 2017, 11:41:14 AM
Kann nicht antworten auf was, Nyom Maria? Was und wo genauer?

Nyom Sophorn. Nyom Chomroeun kann kurzlich email Daten bekommen. Mal annehmend das PW auch vergessen, (abgesenhen von der Möglichkeit, link zu drücken wenn) wird Atma ein neues anlegen und ihm mailen.
 

Maria

September 04, 2017, 11:30:41 AM
 :-*
Werther Bhante , selbiges Problem was ich schon einmal hatte, Login geht aber kann nicht antworten, bin am Nachmittag bei neuen Computer, dieser hier ist schon über 12 Jahre alt.
 

Sophorn

September 04, 2017, 11:23:14 AM
Kana hat das File runtergeladen und U. Chamroeun gegeben,  der sich um die Kprrektur annehmen möchte. Kana wird auch gern das File den anderen Schülern zum Lesen teilen. Ev. sehen mehr Augen mehr.
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Sophorn

September 04, 2017, 11:17:06 AM
Verehrter Bhante, Chamroeun kann sich nicht einloggen. Ist das Passwort für E-mail oder sangham.net? In beiden Fällen haben kana das erfolglos probiert.
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Sophorn

September 04, 2017, 11:08:26 AM
 :-* :-* :-*
 

Johann

August 20, 2017, 01:37:40 AM
Es ist vielleicht gut eine Pause zu tun, doch kann es gut sein, daß man nicht zurückkehrt, für ein gutes oder schlechtes, für sich selbt und andere. Gut dort wo gut genährt und unterstützt und for allem Konzentration steigt, oder dort wo satt in jeder Hinsicht.
 

Johann

August 10, 2017, 11:31:40 AM
Wenn jemand Lust hat, oder anderen etwas Gutes oder Besseres tun kann und möchte: Korrekturlesen http://sangham.net/index.php/topic,1018.msg9625.html#msg9625 Baue nach und nach, so gut wie möglich ein auf ZzE.
 

Johann

August 07, 2017, 02:24:55 AM
Einen ausübungsreichen Vollmond-Uposatha and Gelegenheit die Mönche zu besuchen wünscht meine Person.
 

Sophorn

July 25, 2017, 03:59:03 PM
... versteht und womöglich sieht, wenn er nicht den Weg hierher
findet.

Großer Dank an alle im Hintergrund.

Mögen all diese Früchte vielfach zurückkommen und inspirieren.

Ayu vanno sukkham balam

 :-* :-* :-*
 

Sophorn

July 25, 2017, 03:55:25 PM
 :-* :-* :-*
karuna tvay bongkum Preah metschah

Herzliches Hallo an alle nach sehr langem!

Ein herzliches Dankeschön aus tiefsten Herzen an alle, die sich hier aktiv und indirekt hier beteiligen. Vor allem ein großes Sadhu an Bhante, der unvergleichliche Arbeit leistet, die kaum jemand ver
 

Johann

July 24, 2017, 03:15:56 AM
Fehlinvestition: Was immer man nicht in die Juwelen, in den Pfad investiert, ist vergeude Mühe, schnurrr einen fest im Rad des Leidens. Prüfen Sie es!   :) Wiederholungstäter...
 

Johann

July 17, 2017, 01:50:17 AM
Moritz
 

Moritz

July 16, 2017, 02:28:02 PM
Namasakara, Bhante _/\_
 

Johann

July 14, 2017, 07:07:17 AM
Moritz. Gut ihn früh Morgens und nicht bis in den frühen Morgen zu sehen.
 

Moritz

July 14, 2017, 07:03:53 AM
Namasakara, Bhante _/\_
 

Johann

July 13, 2017, 08:12:46 AM
Moritz.
 

Moritz

July 13, 2017, 07:42:39 AM
Chom reap lea
_/\_
 

Moritz

July 13, 2017, 07:40:46 AM
Namasakara, Bhante _/\_
 

Johann

July 08, 2017, 02:26:09 AM
Vor mehr als 2500 Jahen wurde a diesem Vollmondtag das Rad des Dhammas in bewegung gesetzt. Anumodana!
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

July 02, 2017, 08:24:13 AM
Sehr ehrwürdiger Samanera Johann,

ich bedanke mich bei Ihnen für Ihre nette Erklärung.

Dhamma Grüße an Sie aus Sri Lanka!

 

Johann

July 01, 2017, 07:43:41 PM
Nyom Mohan. Besser: "Ich hoffe, daß es Ihnen gut geht." und bestens (ohne suggerieren, wenn interessiert) "Wie geht es Ihnen." Oder: "Möge es Ihnen Gut gehen." (wenn metta ausdrücken wollend)
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

July 01, 2017, 10:43:15 AM
Sehr ehrwürdiger Samanera Johann,

ich glaube, dass es Ihnen gut geht.

Dhamma Grüße an Sie aus Sri Lanka!
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

July 01, 2017, 10:32:46 AM
Werter Micro,
herzliche Grüße aus Sri Lanka nach Deutschland!
 

Johann

July 01, 2017, 10:32:17 AM
Nyom Mohan.
 

Johann

June 25, 2017, 01:38:38 PM
Alles Zufälle. Nissaya. Und wenn da keine starke Grundlagenursache aufkommt, upanissayapaccayena, na dann war's das, und alles is weg. Lebewesen sind Erben ihrer Taten (im Geist, Wort und Körper).
 

Johann

June 25, 2017, 01:27:24 PM
Schwupps und weg. Waffen und Nahrung geholt.

Oh, was sag ich. Wenn man's doch nehmen kann, auch ohne das Gefühl zu nehmen... Unsinn hier. Hat doch keiner interesse Verdienste zu tun.
 

Johann

June 25, 2017, 01:21:28 PM
Mirco. Wie geht es?
 

Johann

June 25, 2017, 01:20:43 PM
Es ist doch viel angenehmer, wenn man sich nehmen kann was und wann immer man will, oder? Warum sollte man sich so viel antun, da sind genügend die Anbieten.
 

Johann

June 14, 2017, 06:45:07 PM
Jetzt aber vorerst. Möge jeder guten Unterhalt (ung) im Dhamma und Stärkung finden uud sich davon reichlich nehmen.
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

June 11, 2017, 08:24:45 AM
Werter Harry,

ich freue mich darüber, nach einigen Monaten wieder auf sangham.net Sie zu grüßen.

Herzliche Grüße aus Sri Lanka nach Deutschland!
 

Johann

June 09, 2017, 05:05:59 PM
Mögen sich alle, möge sich Guest der Uposatha-Einhaltung nicht nur heute annehmen, und glücksverheißende Zeit verbringen.

May all, may Guest not only today observe the Uposatha and spend auspicious time
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

June 03, 2017, 01:48:08 AM
Sehr ehrwürdiger Samanera Johann,

es geht mir zur Zeit gut. Ich glaube, dass es Ihnen auch gut geht.

Dhamma Grüße an Sie aus Sri Lanka!
 

Johann

June 02, 2017, 11:19:32 PM
Wie geht es Upasaka Mohan?
 

Mohan Gnanathilake

June 02, 2017, 10:51:50 PM
Wie sehr ehrwürdiger Samanera Johann geschrieben hat, hatte ich am 10. Mai 2017 meinen  Geburtstag, an dem Tag  in diesem Jahr das Wesakfest gefeiert wurde.
Beste Grüße an Sie aus Sri Lanka!
Mohan Barathi Gnanathilake
 

Johann

June 02, 2017, 12:33:54 PM
Wußte doch, daß so Nahrung immer gefressen werden will.  :)
"Sehr gut, weiter hungern."

Freut das Nyom Marcel wohlauf ist.

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