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Talkbox

2019 Nov 14 22:00:48
Cheav Villa: _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 21:39:00
Johann: Duties and Silas are words of same meaning, denoting "proper conduct and giving in ones relations where ne desires to have a good and safe stand"

2019 Nov 14 21:25:51
Cheav Villa:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 21:21:02
Johann: May all have good rest at the end of day, done ones duties or even a blessed done merits after that as well. My person is now off of energy and good to rest as well.

2019 Nov 14 13:43:11
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 10:35:51
Johann: Respecting the Devas one gains their respect and protection.

2019 Nov 14 10:34:40
Johann: Bhante. (Meawmane is a spirit from a Server in Bangkok)

2019 Nov 14 10:28:52
Khemakumara: Nyom Meawmane

2019 Nov 14 10:27:53
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante

2019 Nov 13 20:44:51
Cheav Villa:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 13 20:28:20
Johann: Bhante  _/\_ Nyom, Nyom

2019 Nov 13 13:19:14
Cheav Villa: Kana Bhante :) _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 13 11:54:18
Johann: Mahā (written), not moha (following civil transliteration of khmer, very unuseful, better following pali transliteration) "Deluded Wisdom Monastery" could be understood while "Great Wisdom Monastery"  :)

2019 Nov 13 10:22:14
Johann: mudita

2019 Nov 13 09:56:41
Cheav Villa: Kana now at Panha Moha Viheara, waiting for  Bhikkuni

2019 Nov 13 09:47:10
Cheav Villa: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 12 08:01:41
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 12 05:35:02
Khemakumara:  Sīlena nibbutiṁ yanti. Through virtue they go to Unbinding. May it be a fruit-and pathful Uposatha day.

2019 Nov 11 16:41:52
Varado: Happily indeed we live, we, for whom there is [nowhere] anything at all. We will feed on rapture like the Ābhassarā devas. Dh.v.200.

2019 Nov 11 11:40:45
Johann: Ven. Sirs  _/\_ (Kana trust that leave for some rest will not reduce Bhantes releasing joy here)

2019 Nov 11 11:13:48
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 11 11:06:19
Johann: May it be an auspicious end of the Vassa of the Noble ones, a deep Anapanasati day today, for all conducting the full moon uposatha today.

2019 Nov 11 06:00:43
Johann: " Happy/peaceful the area/custom of the Arahats, craving and wandering on having layed aside"?

2019 Nov 11 03:22:11
Johann: Of which would mean what, Lok Ta, if not wishing to use google or not given means?

2019 Nov 10 23:54:03
Varado: Sukhino vata arahanto taṇhā tesaṃ na vijjati _/\_

2019 Nov 10 19:51:07
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante Ariyadhammika

2019 Nov 10 17:54:44
Johann: ភនតេ វ៉ាលិ

2019 Nov 10 14:42:47
Johann: Lok Ta  _/\_

2019 Nov 09 16:31:12
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  :) _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 16:25:14
Johann: May Nyom and all have a safe travel

2019 Nov 09 16:03:41
Cheav Villa: Kana and kids Plan to go to Aural tomorrow, will leave Phnom Penh at 5am  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 15:41:39
Cheav Villa: Vandami Bhante  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 15:37:40
Johann: Bhante Ariyadhammica, Nyom Villa

2019 Nov 09 15:35:16
Johann: Sadhu

2019 Nov 09 14:56:15
Varado: Homage to the Noble Sangha _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 14:55:15
Varado: Blessed is the arising of Buddhas. Blessed is the explaining of the true teaching. Blessed is concord in the community of bhikkhus. Of those in concord, blessed is their practice of austerity.

2019 Nov 09 14:53:06
Johann: Ven Grandfather, Nyom Annaleana,

2019 Nov 09 01:57:47
Moritz: Vandami, Bhante Varado _/\_

2019 Nov 09 01:43:05
Varado: Pūjā ca pūjanīyānaṃ

2019 Nov 09 00:44:14
Johann: Worthy those on path or reached the aim

2019 Nov 08 22:36:29
Varado: Homage to those elder bhikkhus of long-standing who have long gone forth, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha. _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:16:23
Johann: May the Venerables allow my persons leave, running out of battery.  _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:09:51
Johann: Sadhu, Sadhu!

2019 Nov 08 20:09:14
Varado: Homage to Good Friends. For this is the entire holy life. _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:07:04
Varado: Homage to the Good Friends. For this is the entire holy life. _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 19:29:09
Varado: Thanks for summary. I send article on milk. Anything else?

2019 Nov 08 18:53:24
Varado: Also greed, hatred, and delusion. Tīni akusalamūlāni: lobho akusalamūlaṃ doso akusalamūlaṃ moho akusalamūlaṃ (D.3.214).

2019 Nov 08 18:36:34
Johann: So does it, so does it, for Bhikkhus, layman, laywoman as well. And what is the root of stinginess? Ingratitude (wrong view).

2019 Nov 08 18:30:56
Varado: Possessing five qualities, a bhikkhuni is deposited in hell as if brought there. What five? She is miserly with dwellings, families, gains, praise, and the Dhamma (A.3.139). Pañcahi bhikkhave dhammehi samannāgatā bhikkhunī yathābhataṃ nikkhittā evaṃ niraye: katamehi pañcahi: Āvāsamaccha

2019 Nov 08 18:23:39
Varado: Macchariya for lodgings, maybe?

2019 Nov 08 18:01:17
Johann: Kana saw that Bhikkhunis has even a rule in regard of macchariya, for Vineyya in their Vinaya.

2019 Nov 08 17:58:14
Johann: So does it dear Ven. Grandfather, so does it. Amacchariya is the domain of the Noble Ones, beginning by the stream to the complete of stinginess's root.

2019 Nov 08 17:51:33
Varado: Having eliminated the stain of stinginess together with its origin, they are beyond criticism.

2019 Nov 08 17:35:15
Johann: ...and "Vineyya maccheramalaṁ samūlaṁ aninditā"

2019 Nov 08 17:29:21
Johann: These Devas and Brahmas...  :) mudita

2019 Nov 08 16:53:41
Varado: May the Buddha bless you. May the Dhamma shine on you. May Wat Ayum be a refuge to many. For any possible help with questions, please email. My pleasure.

2019 Nov 08 13:55:57
Johann: ..."This shows that the Buddha would not be troubled by those who become angry and resentful, but by those who are strongly opinionated and who relinquish their views reluctantly...."

2019 Nov 08 09:27:01
Johann: Ven. Bhantes

2019 Nov 08 09:23:11
Khemakumara:   _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante Ariyadhammika

2019 Nov 08 06:26:12
Johann: It was four days after closing that decreased in last instance

2019 Nov 08 06:15:13
Moritz: The bot traffic is not decreasing.

2019 Nov 08 06:15:10
Johann: Ayasma Moritz

2019 Nov 08 06:14:53
Moritz: (was logged in long time before, but not at PC)

2019 Nov 08 06:14:52
Johann: Ayasama Moritz

2019 Nov 08 06:14:06
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 02:08:55
Moritz: Sadhu _/\_ May Bhante bear and overcome all sickness well _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 02:05:42
Khemakumara: Khantı paramaṁ tapo tītikkhā. Patient forbearance is the highest austerity

2019 Nov 08 02:01:46
Khemakumara: lack of energy because of sickness of the body (boils) Nyom Moritz

2019 Nov 08 01:53:48
Khemakumara: Meister Moritz

2019 Nov 08 01:52:12
Moritz: Hoping Bhante is well _/\_

2019 Nov 08 01:51:55
Moritz: Vandami Bhante (Khemakumara) _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 07 20:02:22
Johann: enery, battery saysfinish for now... may there be food for liberation be found and got touched by many independently.

2019 Nov 07 20:00:16
Johann: Every being, even without capacity to gain higher, is worthy of metta, worthy to be not harmed in existance, worthy to help in times of needing the four paccayas, Ven. Grandfather.

2019 Nov 07 19:37:39
Visitor: Let us treat those with Buddhanature with the respect appropriate to future Buddhas.

2019 Nov 07 19:01:03
Johann: Maybe an inspirig topic on the matter How should I express Mudita or Joy for all beings? for all having access (upanissaya).

2019 Nov 07 18:56:59
Johann: Sadhu, Sadhu. That's how mudita is good understood in relation with "Buddhanature"

2019 Nov 07 18:54:52
Visitor: Homage to all those with Buddhanature. _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 07 18:53:59
Visitor:  Homage to all the Buddhas.  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 07 18:28:47
Johann: Dear lok ta Visitor

2019 Nov 07 17:29:02
Cheav Villa:  _/\_  _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 07 17:24:12
Johann: Don't worry either, yet perfect if visiting the Nuns. Mudita

2019 Nov 07 17:21:15
Cheav Villa: About the medicin called loṇasociraka, Kana will take time to go to Visit Wat Panha to ask her for detail  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 07 17:21:05
Johann: Cetana counts, the own one, Nyom.

2019 Nov 07 17:18:42
Johann: May Nyom not worry to much about it. My person guesses Nyom Chanroth might have lot of joy in the idea of planting. While Cacaco is fine, yet not a need or request, it's something that can be gained in shops.

2019 Nov 07 17:09:57
Cheav Villa: Kana now seen without Sila… someone could not tell the truth 

2019 Nov 07 17:01:13
Cheav Villa: Kana ordered 5kg via web, phoned them 2days ago but still no delivery cause of no confirmation since he still abroad now

2019 Nov 07 16:49:17
Cheav Villa: But the Cacao company in Mondolkiri doesnt allowed, they sale Cacao beans.

2019 Nov 07 16:47:38
Cheav Villa: Kana Bhante  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ as he informed to bring only Cacao fruits for Bhante could make and use of medecine againts Malaria

2019 Nov 07 16:20:48
Johann: Indeed releasing investigation cause hunger and no food can be expected at the end as well.

2019 Nov 07 16:18:35
Johann: When homeless effort is requested, no joy in sacrificing into it. Oh this monks... of modern world.  :)

2019 Nov 07 16:16:59
Johann: Oh this monks  :) When household effort can be made for favor and house, all engaged...

2019 Nov 07 14:17:18
Johann: Āyasmā Moritz (Master, a usual address for skilled lay people in the Tipitaka)

2019 Nov 06 17:27:06
Cheav Villa: Master Moritz _/\_

2019 Nov 06 17:23:52
Moritz: Bong Villa _/\_

2019 Nov 06 17:23:46
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_

2019 Nov 06 00:13:12
Vithou:  _/\_

2019 Nov 05 22:47:19
Moritz: Hello Visitor! _/\_

2019 Nov 05 16:44:34
Johann: ...and that is good! Cacao

2019 Nov 05 16:31:04
Cheav Villa: Kana Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ :)

2019 Nov 05 16:28:43
Johann: no secrets...

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Author Topic: The greatest blessing, ឧត្តមមង្គលុ, Die groessten Segen - Nina Van Gorkom  (Read 4960 times)

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Offline Johann

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 *sgift*

Hier im kloster gibt es unmengen an Tipitaka, kommentaren, literatur, doch ich denke das diese paar seiten die hier folgen die einzigen englischsprachigen sind.

Wie auch immer, vor ein paar tagen haba ich begonnen die worte der werten Nina Van Gorkom zu uebersetzen, die sich in einem buch eines hier sehr bekannten moenches wiedergefunden haben. Das buch duerfte nicht vollstaendig sein.

Vielleicht moechte jemand Nina Van Gorkom um das original bitten um es teilen zu koennen. Ich hatte schon mal kontakt mit ihr ueber rober k. und sie ist grundsaetzlich mehr als erfreut, wenn man ihre gaben weiter teilt. Sangham.net hatte ja schon dhamma in cambodia bekommen, um es auf zze zu veroeffentlichen.

Habe gerade die moeglichkeit das tablet vom werten ratana zu nutzen und werde versuchen hier diese seiten (engl., khmer) inkl. einer sicher mangelhaften uebersetzung ins deutsche, als bilder zu posten.

Also wenn jemand lust hat die etwas andere herangehensweise an das berühmte sutta zu teilen, mag hier alles offen sein.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2016, 03:45:57 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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etwas durcheinander, hier soweit mal meinereiner geschreibsl
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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10 holder zweiter teil
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

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weitere
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die letzten.auf das buch selbst, hab ich gerade keinen zugang. anumodana
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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Der Englische Text aus einer Texterkennung, unbearbeitet.


Quote

PREFACE

For People who come to Thailand and want to study Buddhism it is difficult to know how and where to start. They hear different explanations of the teachings and they are confronted with different ways of practice It is hard to find the wise person who can help one to study the Buddhas teachings and to point the way to the practice in accordance with the teachings. Many people who come to know the Buddha's teachings want to apply themselves to mental development immediately in order to reach the goal of their lives. They want to develop meditation without first studying the Buddha's teachings and thus they do not know that mental development includes both samatha (tranquil meditation) and vipassanā (insight meditation) they do not know that the practice of samatha and vipassanā are different and that they lead to different results. If we do not study the Buddha's teachings before we start with mental development we cannot have right understanding about the practice and we do not know whether the practice we follow is the Buddha's way or not.

I have met people who did not really know what kind of meditation they were developing and to what goal it was leading. Their aim was peace of mind but instead of finding peace of mind they became very confused. The teachings are so subtle one needs to study them thoroughly and to consider them very carefully in order to understand what the Buddha taught about mental development.

The Buddha who became enlightened and clearly knew all that is real is our teacher He left us his teachings in the “Tipitaka”, the Buddhist scriptures. The Buddha’s teachings themselves should be our guide in the practice. If we follow our own way or the method of someone else instead of the Buddha's way, we will not reach the goal.

In this Book I do not pretend to give a complete outline of the Buddha’s teachings. My purpose is to draw the reader to the teachings themselves and to the practice in accordance with the teachings. I want to ask the reader to read this book with discrimination and to investigate himself the Buddhist scriptures. By our own practice we can prove whether the way we follow is right or wrong. If we intend to develop vipassanā the result should be more understanding of the realities which appear at the present moment through the five senses and the mind and less clinging to the concept of self. In the final analysis the reader will have to find out himself and to decide for himself about the path he wants to follow in his life. I would like to ask the reader to consider whether this book is a guide for him to the teachings and to the practice.

One may have doubts about mental development in daily life. Many people say that they have no free time to apply themselves to it. They complain that in this hectic time there is not any moment of quietness, no possibility of having concentration of mind They think that they should retire from worldly life in order to develop the mind. When we study what the Buddha taught about mental development we will see that there can be mental development in daily life. For samatha one needs a quiet place and free time. Vipassanā however, is a way of mental development which can be cultivated at any moment.

The Buddha who became enlightened and clearly knew all that is real is our teacher. He left us his teachings in the ‘Tipitaka', the Buddhist scriptures. The Buddha's teachings themselves should be our guide in the practice If we follow our own way or the method of someone else instead of the Buddha's way. we will not reach the goal

In this Book I do not pretend to give a complete outline of the Buddha's teachings My purpose is to draw the reader to the teachings themselves and to the practice in accordance with the teachings. I want to ask the reader to read this book with discrimination and to investigate himself the Buddhist scriptures By our own practice we can prove whether the way we follow is right or wrong. If we intend to develop vipassanā the result should be more understanding of the realities which appear at the present moment through the five senses and the mind and less clinging to the concept of self. In the final analysis the reader will have to find out himself and to decide for himself about the path he wants to follow in his life. I would like to ask the reader to consider whether this book is a guide for him to the teachings and to the practice.

One may have doubts about mental development in daily life Many people say that they have no free time to apply themselves to it 11iey complain that in this hectic time there is not any moment of quietness no possibility of having concentration of mind They think that they should retire from worldly life in order to develop the mind When we study what the Buddha taught about mental development we will see that there can be mental development in daily life For samatha one needs a quiet place and free time Vipassana however is a way of mental development which can be cultivated at any moment
. as .

of our daily life The Buddha taught vipassanā to monks and laypeople to be developed during their daily activities Monks who are occupied with the study of Pali with the teaching of dhamma with writing with the building of a temple and laypeople who are occupied with their families and the earning of a living they all can be mindful of the realities appearing through eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body-sense and minddoor Is there not seeing hearing, thinking, hardness, motion. happiness or unhappiness while one is performing one s task and can there not be mindfulness of those characteristics when they appear” Did the Buddha say that there are moments that we should not be mindful’?

This book was written in Thailand where I lived for some years I experienced that ‘to reside in a suitable location” is the greatest blessing (Maha-Mangalasutta) Thailand was the country where I met the “wise person", the “good friend in dhamma”, who led me to the Buddha’s teachings, who pointed out the way to develop the eightfold path It is a great blessing to live in a country where the dhamma is taught and practiced. In Thailand one can meet many people who do not set a limit to their generosity, be they rich or poor Generosity is an essential virtue when there is still stinginess the wrong view of self is hard to eradicate How can we become detached from the concept of self if we still hold tight to our property’? In Thailand one is inspired to greater generosity

Many people in Thailand know the value of kusala and they appreciate the kusala cittas of others Doing wholesome deeds and appreciating the wholesome deeds of others are ways people can help each other to have more wholesomeness in life I have experienced this in Thailand
.859
 The wrmng of thxs book would not have been possrble wtthout the asststance of Mtss Sujm Bonhamwanaket who gave me such valuable advtce and who translated the text mto the Thai language The chapters wntten tn the way of questxon and answer are real l1fe the questions were posed by people who were confronted wnth many problems 1n the practlce I found by my own expenence that the practtce IS very subtle, that the clmgmg to the notton of self and the destre for result can easxly lead us astray make us follow the wrong path Instead of the nght path

When I wrote II'llS book I thought of many people who want to know the truth about themselves I found Dhamma the greatest blessxng m 11fe and therefore I want to share Wlth others what I learned from the teachmgs and the practice.

hopmg that thls book can help them to find the path leadxng to
real peace ‘

May the Dhamma be the greatest blessmg In our lnves,

Nma van Gorkom.

Mina van garkpm
xouyncnlaan 49
‘Wasunaar

Mctfiarlanls

-b- '

THE GREATEST BLESSiIN GS

In the Mahé-Mangalasutta (the Greatest Blessings, Sutta-Nipata II, 4, Khuddaka Nikaya) we read that a deva came to see the Buddha when he was ° staying at An2'1thapindika’s monastery, in the Jeta Grove, and asked him what are the greatest blessings. In reply the Buddha spoke to him about the greatest blessings All the blessings of a life full of dhamma are comprised in this sutta We 1
read .

“Not to associate with the foolish, but to
associate with the wise, and to honour those

who are worthy of honour-this is the greatest
blessing.

To reside in a suitable locality, to have done
meritorious actions in the past and to set

oneself in the right course—this is the greatest
blessing.

.63.

To have much learning, to be skilful in
handicrafts, well-trained in discipline, and to be
of good speech—this is the greatest blessing.

To support mother and father, to cherish
wife and children, and to be engaged in peaceful
occupation—this is the greatest blessing

To be generous in giving, to be righteous
in conduct, to help one’s relatives, and to be
blameless in action—this IS the greatest blessing.

To loathe evil and abstain from it, to
refrain from intoxicants, and to be steadfast in
virtue—this is the greatest blessing

To be respectful, humble, contented and
grateful; and to listen to the dhamma on due
occasions—this is the greatest blessing.

.5»

To be patient and obedient, to associate
with the holy ones and to have religious
dlSCllSSl0nS on due occas1ons—this is the
I / greatest blessing

Self-restraint, a holy and pure life, the
perception of the noble truths and the realisation
of mbbana—th1s IS the greatest blessing.

A mind unruffled by worldly conditions,
from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed,
full of peace—th1s is the greatest blessmg.

Those who thus abide, ever remain
invincible, in happmess established These are
the greatest blessings ”

ṭ Qdfi

“Not to associate with the foolish, but to associate with the wise; and to honour those who are worthy of honour” are the first blessings. The last blessings, which are the blessings of the arahat, cannot be attained if one does not have the first blessings. If ‘one does not know the right conditions for enlightenment nibbana cannot be realised There are four conditions for enlightenment, the first of wich is association with the “righteous person”, the second. listening to dhamma, the third “wise consideration” of dhamma, and the fourth’ practising dhamma (Samyutta Nikaya, Mahfi-vagga, Kindred Sayings on Streamwinning, chapter 1, par. 5.) We cannot hear dhamma, investigate the truth of it and practise it, unless we have met the right person who can point us the way to the Buddha’s teachings.

Do we want to be associated with foolish people or with wise people? It is of no use to apply ourselves to mental development if we do not scrutinize ourselves first in regard of this question. We are inclined to associate with people who have the same ideas and the same likes and dislikes as ourselves Our inclinations are like elements, they arise by conditions. The same elements attract each other. We read in the “Niddanavagga” (Samyutta Nikaya, Kindred Sayings on Elements, chapter XIV, par. 14): “Through an element it is, monks, that beings flow together, meet together. Being of low tastes flow together, meet together with them of low tastes. They of virtuous tastes flow together, meet together with them of virtuous tastes. So they have done in the past. So will they do in the future. So do they now in the present.”

.05-

When we are together with someone for a long time we cannot help being influenced by that person. If we have foolish friends, who do not know the value of kusala, who act and speak in an unwholesome way, it is to our decline We may not notice that we are under their influence, but gradually we may be inclined to follow their ways. If we have friends who know the value of kusala, who are generous, perform good deeds and speak in a wholesome way, it encourages us to more wholesomeness The Buddha often pointed out the dangers of evil friendship and the benefit of righteous friendship

Fools do not know what is wholesome and what is unwholesome They praise what should not be praised and do not give honour to those who should be honoured. High esteem is given to the most beautiful woman of the country or the world, or to persons who have the greatest skill in the field of sports, or else to the best actor or musician Should we disapprove

-96-

of people who have beauty, strength or skill‘? We cannot force ourselves not to admire them, but if we have right understanding of kusala and akusala we will know whether it IS wholesome or unwholesome to be attached to beauty, strength and skill. We will know whether those things lead to the welfare of ourselves and others or not How confused our life is when we have not heard about dhamma We do not know what 1S wholesome and what 1S unwholesome; we do not know about cause and effect in life. -

When we suffer we do not understand why this has to happen to us In our life there are gain and loss, honour and dishonour, praise and blame, happiness and misery They are called in the teachings the eight “worldly conditions” . (loka-dhamma).

.95.

We read in the “Anguttara Nikaya (Book of the Eights, chapter I, par 5): “ Monks, these eight worldly conditions obsess the world, the world revblves around these eight worldly conditions. What eight‘? Gain and loss, fame and obscurity, blame and praise, contentment and pain. .. . Ll

How susceptible we are to those worldly conditions. We are so sensitive to the way other people treat us We attach great importance to being blamed or praised by others, to receiving honour or not being honoured If we do not receive the honour we think is due to us we feel slighted We have feelings of bitterness towards others who treat us badly If we do not make the career in life we were hoping to make and if work is assigned to us which we fmd beneath our rank, we are frustrated.

‘ .96.

There are many reasons for us to feel irritated, depressed or angry Is there a day that everything goes according to our wishes, a day of perfect happiness‘? When we do not have right understanding, we are obsessed by the “worldly conditions”, we are foolish people

The Buddha pointed out the dangers of being enslaved to the “worldly conditions” To what does it lead '7 It leads to an unhappy rebirth Devadatta, who caused a schism in the order and separated from it with five hundred monks, was a fool; he was obsessed by “worldly conditions” and depraved by evil friendship. We read in the “Anguttara Nikfiya” (Book of the Eights, chapter I, par 7, Devadatta) that the Buddha spoke to the monks, while he was staying on Vulture’s Peak, not long after the departure of Devadatta: “. . .Monks, mastered by eight wrong states, Devadatta, with his mind out of control,
.50.

became one doomed to suffer in hell, in perdition, dwelling there a kalpa, irreprievable.

By what eight ?

Mastered by gain by loss by fame by obscurity by honour . by lack of honour by evil intentions .. . by evil friendship, with his mind out of control, Devadatta became one doomed to suffer in hell, in perdition, dwelling there a kalpa, irreprievable.....”

Fools like Devadatta who are obsessed by worldly conditions cannot teach dhamma They wish others to follow them blindly They do not lead people to the Buddha’s teachings so that they can investigate the truth themselves. If we associate with fools we cannot have right understanding about our life. We will become more obsessed by the “worldly conditions” and there is no way for us to eradicate defilements.

ṭ .196.

The Buddha, “Teacher of devas and men”, taught out of compassion for the world, not in order to have “gain, honour and praise” in return. He pointed out that Dhamma is important, not the person who teaches it. We read in the Samyutta Nikaya ( Khandha—vagga, Kindred Sayings on Elements, Middle Fifty IV, par 87, Vakkali) about Vakkali who was sick and who had been longing for a long time to set eyes on the Buddha The Buddha came to see him and taught him dhamma, he pointed out to him the impermanency of all conditioned things, so that he could cultivate the eightfold path We read that Vakkali said to the Buddha :

“ ‘For a long time, lord, I have been
longing to set eyes on the Exalted One, but I
had not strength enough in this body to come to
see the Exalted One.’

‘Hush, Vakkalil What IS there in seeing
this vile body of mine '7 He who sees Dhamma,
Vakkali, he sees me he who sees me, Vakkali,
he sees Dhamma. Verily, seeing Dhamma,
Vakkali, one sees me : seeing me, one sees
Dhamma.

.bé.

As to th1S what do you thmk, Vakkali '7 Is
-body permanent or impermanent ? ’

‘Impermanent, lord.’

‘Is feeling .. perception, the act1v1ties,is
consciousness permanent, or 1mpermanent'7’

‘Impermanent, lord.’

‘Wherefore, Vakkali, he who thus sees
.. . he knows * for life in these conditions
there is no hereafter ’ ”

The‘ wise person does not want others to follow him bl1ndly, but he helps them in such a way that they can realise the truth themselves and do not need to be dependant on him; this is the most effective help one can give to others. He leads them directly to the Buddha's teachings and encourages them to study the “Tip1taka” (Vmaya, Suttanta and Abhidhamma). Then they can have “w1se consideration” of the teachings and verify dhamma themselves He points out the way by which they can realise themselves the perception of impermanency. The aim of the Buddha’s teachings is seeing things as they are. As long as we do not see things as they are we take for happiness what is not happiness, we take for permanent what is impermanent, we take for self what is non-self.

We read in the Samyutta Nikaya (Kindred Sayings on sense, First Fifty, III, par 26, Comprehension) : “Without fully knowing, without fully comprehending the all, monks, without detaching himself from, without abandoning the all, a man 1S incapable of extinguishing Ill.

Without fully knowing, without comprehending, without detaching himself from, without abandoning what, is a man incapable of extinguishing Ill?
.bd.

It 1s by not fully know1ng the eye 0b_]€CtS eye-conscxousness eye—contact that pleasant or unpleasant or mdlfferent
feellng the ear . sound . the nose
odour .. the body . .touches the m1nd.
mmdobjects that a man 1s mcapable of
ext1ngu1sh1ng Ill Th1s 13 the all, monks,
w1thout fully knowmg whlch a man 1s so
mcapable ‘

But by fully knowmg, by comprehendmg,
by detachlng hlmself from, by abandomng the
all, one 1s capable of ext1ngu1sh1ng Ill ”

The _Buddha pomted out t1me and agam the impermanence of seemg, hearlng and all the other rea11t1es whxch we experlence through the SIX doors 1n order to remlnd people to be aware of the seeing at th1s moment, of the hear1ng at th1s moment.

.010.

If we are not mmdful of the see1ng- conscrousness wh1ch appears at the present moment or of the other realmes appearmg now, we wrll not have a precnse knowledge of therr charactertstrcs and thus we wtll not be able to see them as they are The wrse person does not teach a dhamma whrch 1s drfferent from the Buddha’s teachmgs He does not po1nt out thmgs wh1ch do not lead to the goal He does not drscourage people to study and be does not discourage them to be mmdful He encourages them to be mmdful of the reality appearrng at the present moment, no matter where they are and no matter what they are domg It 1s essentral to f1nd out whether the person w1th whom we assocrate rs the rrght friend m dhamma or not. If he 1s not the rnght person he cannot point out to us the way to see thmgs as they are We wrll know that he IS the rrght person 1f he helps us to know the

-019.

characterlstlc of seemg Wl’l1Cl‘l appears now, of hearmg wh1ch appears now, and of the other rea11t1es whrch present themselves through the s1x doors. Thxs Is the way the Buddha taught as the one and only way to erad1cate the concept of self, to see thmgs as they are When there Is less attachment to the concept of self we know by our own experrence that assoclatlon w1th the WISC 15 the greatest blessmg?
To honour those who are worthy of honour 1s the greatest blessmg The Buddha, the Dhamma, the Sangha are worthy of honour. The w1se person who taught us the development of the e1ghtfold path 1s worthy of honour How can we honour those who are worthy of honour 1n the most appropnate way ? We feel deep gratxtude to the Buddha and we want to glve expresslon to our gratxtude. We can honour h1m

ṭ -aié.

in following his last words‘ “Transient are all the elements of being ' Strive with earnestness ! ” (Maha-Parinibbānasutta, Digha Nikaya) We should not be heedless We are not heedless if we are mindful. Without the Buddha’s teachings we would not be mindful at this moment and there would be no way to eradicate defilements at all. The whole purpose of the teachings is the eradication of defilements by the development of wisdom. Therefore, each moment of mindfulness is the highest form of respect to the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha “To reside in a suitable location” is the greatest blessing We cannot meet the good friend in dhamma in any place. wise people are rare in the world. It is a great blessing to live in a country where dhamma is taught and practised, so that we have an opportunity to know the Buddha’s teachings There are many thmgs that have to comclde so that we can meet the nght person It IS not by mere chance that we meet h1m, 1t 1s condmoned by kamma

When we meet a w1se person we may not be ready yet to rece1ve dhamma It may not be the nght t1me for us to hsten to dhamma; we may not be capable yet of “w1se consrderatxon” of the teach1ngs Accumulatlons of wholesome deeds are very helpful to make us ready for rece1v1ng of dhamma. “To have done mer1tor1ous deeds 1n the past” 1s the greatest blessmg We read 1n the “Thera—TherT g.ath2't” that the men and women 1n the Buddha’s trme who attamed enllghtenment had accumulated mer1tor1ous deeds for aeons and that they had 11St€I’1Cd to dhamma preached by Buddhas of former t1mes We read about Subha (Commentary to the “Theri-gatha” Subha, 70, Paramattha-Dipani Thera-'1‘heā_ ggtha Atthakatha) .

-cnd-

“She, too, havmg made her resolve under
former Buddhas, and accumulated good of age-
endunng effrcacy, so that she had progressxvely
planted the root of good and accumulated the
cond1t1ons of emanclpatron, was, 1n thrs
Buddha-era reborn at Rajagaha ”

When we see the many cond1t1ons necessary for w1sdom to reach maturlty we w1ll be less 1ncl1ned to th1nk that 1t 1s self who develops the elghtfold path When we read about the “accumulated good of age-endurmg eff1cacy” of the men and women m the Buddha’s tlme and we conslder how they t1me and agam had hstened to dhamma preached by former Buddhas, before they met the Buddha Gotama and could attam enllghtenment, we are remmded not to be heedless at the present tlme

ṭ -éo.

In the Maha-Mangala-sutta we read about the blessings of a life full of dhamma We read about loving kindness in the relationship between parents and children, between husband and wife, between relatives. We read about self—restraint, a holy and pure life. When we read those words we may feel discouraged and think that we shall never be able to practice what the Buddha taught. Wedwould like to have less lobha, dosa and moha} but can. we force ourselves not to be attached to pleasant things and not to be disturbed by unpleasant things? We cannot force ourselves to be “rightous in conduct”, “to abstain from evil”, “to be steadfast in virtue”. Will all those blessings of a life full of dhamma ever be attainable’?

As long as there is the concept of self there will be no end of lobha, dosa and moha. Our many defilements are the real cause of our unsatisfactoriness in life, day after day. We should be clear in our mind as to

.66.

what we really want In our l1fe' do we want to accumulate more defrlements or do we want to have less difilements‘7 If we want to eradicate defilements we should develop the erghtfold path When there rs mmdfulness of nama and rāpa the notron of self w1ll decrease until rt 1s eradicated Wrth the development of the erghtfold path a radrcal change has started In our lrfe

The Buddha taught the Maha-satlpatthāna (Appllcatrons of Mmdfulness) to monks, nuns, laymen and women layfollower As regards the l1fe of the monks, the Vmaya should not be separated from the Maha-satxpatthana In the Buddha’s txme the Vmaya and the Maha- sat1patthz'1na were not separated We read 1n the “Mah2"1-satipatth2’1na” that one of the greatest blessmgs 1s “To be well-tramed 1n the d1sc1plme” (Vmaya) The Commentary to thrs sutta (Paramatthajotrka. to the Sutta-Nlpata) speaks about the drscxplme of the layman, wh1ch 1s abstmence of the ten lmmoral actrons, and about the drsclplme of the monk The monk

-éc:'-

who develops the eightfold path will have a deeper understanding of the Vinaya and he will observe the rules more perfectly. Each detail of the Vinaya is full of meaning, because the rules promote the welfare of the Sangha and help the monk to lead a pure life, the rules help him to be considerate in his speech and actions; to cause no trouble to others The Vinaya teaches the monk to be watchful in body, speech and mind When one develops mindfulness there is watchfulness as regards the six doors. When there is mindfulness of nama and rāpa we are less infatuated by what we see, hear, smell, taste, touch and perceive through the minddoor. We learn to know our subtle defilements and the danger of even the subtle deālements. The monk.who develops mindfulness will have a
deeper respect for the rules of the Vinaya which remind him to be watchful, seeing danger even in the slightest faults. Thus we see that vinaya and Mah2‘1—satipatth2'ina should not be separated
-éb-

The monk who develops the erghtfold path and attams enllghtenment Wlll not leave the order any more and return to the “lower llfe”. We read In the Samyutta Nlkaya (Maha- vagga, Book I, chapter VI, par. 12) that the Buddha spoke by way of smile about the monk who wxll not return to the layman's hfe, he sand that the rxver Ganges, tendmg towards the east.
cannot be made to change IIS course and tend towards the west We read “Just so, monks, If the r2'1Jah’s royal mrmsters or hrs frrends or
boon compamons or kmsmen or blood relatives were to come to a monk who 15 cultrvating and
makmg much of the arryan erghtfold way, and
were to seek to entlce h1m w1th wealth, sayxng'
‘Come, good man ' Why should these yellow robes torment you ‘7 Why parade about w1th shaven crown and bowl ‘7 Come ! Return to the
 lower hfe and enjoy possessions and do deeds of ment, for that monk so cultlvatmg and makmg much of the artyan erghtfold way,

- éd -
return to the lower life is impossible. Why so '7 36031186. monks, that monk’s heart has for many a long day been bent on detachment,
inclined to‘ detachment, turned towards detachment, so that there is no possibility for

him to return to the lower life ....” The eightfold path changes the life of monks and laypeople. It changes the relationship between parents and children, husband and wife, relatives and friends. There is bound to be attachment and displeasure or anger in the relationship with others, but when we develop mindfulness there are more
conditions for alobha or generosity instead of lobha, for adosa or kindness instead of displeasure or anger. When other people treat us badly there is less the concept of a self who suffers or the concept of another person who treats us badly. There are only nama and rāpa

-110.

arising by conditions; there is not this or that person. We are less susceptible to gain and loss, honour and dishonour, blame and praise, happiness and misery One day there IS blame, another day there IS praise, but receiving blame or praise IS only nima and rāpa arising because of conditions and falling away immediately It is unavoidable that there are both pleasant and unpleasant experiences in life, the more we see that they arise by conditions the less we will take them for self

Those who are arahats have a mind “unruffled by worldly conditions”, they are “from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, full of peace this is greatest blessing” The arahats haye become mvulnerable, nothing can disturb them any more. The sutta continues-
“Those who thus abide,
 ṭ ever remain invincible, in happiness established These are the greatest blessings.”

We are not free from sorrow, but when the wisdom realises a characteristic of nama or rfipa there IS at that moment no fear, anxiety or restlessness, there is peace Is it not true that wisdom brings contentedness, be it only for a moment? At times we may feel discouraged, we may think that the eightfold path is not for us and that we are far off from the realization of the truth We should, however, remember that the Buddha became enlightened and taught the truth for our welfare and happiness The Buddha did not teach anything which cannot be realized. When we develop the eightfold path we come to know ourselves, our daily life. Then we will experience the great blessings of the dhamma which transforms our life.




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Offline Johann

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Eine "Rein"-Schrift des Werkes:

Quote from: Nina van Gorkom, 5 Jänner 2000
PREFACE

For People who come to Thailand and want to study Buddhism it is difficult to know how and where to start. They hear different explanations of the teachings and they are confronted with different ways of practice. It is hard to find the wise person who can help one to study the Buddhas teachings and to point the way to the practice in accordance with the teachings. Many people who come to know the Buddha's teachings want to apply themselves to mental development immediately in order to reach the goal of their lives. They want to develop meditation without first studying the Buddha's teachings and thus they do not know that mental development includes both samatha (tranquil meditation) and vipassanā (insight meditation) they do not know that the practice of samatha and vipassanā are different and that they lead to different results. If we do not study the Buddha's teachings before we start with mental development we cannot have right understanding about the practice and we do not know whether the practice we follow is the Buddha's way or not.

I have met people who did not really know what kind of meditation they were developing and to what goal it was leading. Their aim was peace of mind but instead of finding peace of mind they became very confused. The teachings are so subtle one needs to study them thoroughly and to consider them very carefully in order to understand what the Buddha taught about mental development.

The Buddha who became enlightened and clearly knew all that is real is our teacher. He left us his teachings in the "Tipitaka", the Buddhist scriptures. The Buddha’s teachings themselves should be our guide in the practice. If we follow our own way or the method of someone else instead of the Buddha's way, we will not reach the goal.

In this Book I do not pretend to give a complete outline of the Buddha’s teachings. My purpose is to draw the reader to the teachings themselves and to the practice in accordance with the teachings. I want to ask the reader to read this book with discrimination and to investigate himself the Buddhist scriptures. By our own practice we can prove whether the way we follow is right or wrong. If we intend to develop vipassanā the result should be more understanding of the realities which appear at the present moment through the five senses and the mind and less clinging to the concept of self. In the final analysis the reader will have to find out himself and to decide for himself about the path he wants to follow in his life. I would like to ask the reader to consider whether this book is a guide for him to the teachings and to the practice.

One may have doubts about mental development in daily life. Many people say that they have no free time to apply themselves to it. They complain that in this hectic time there is not any moment of quietness, no possibility of having concentration of mind. They think that they should retire from worldly life in order to develop the mind. When we study what the Buddha taught about mental development we will see that there can be mental development in daily life. For samatha one needs a quiet place and free time. Vipassanā however, is a way of mental development which can be cultivated at any moment.

The Buddha who became enlightened and clearly knew all that is real is our teacher. He left us his teachings in the "Tipitaka", the Buddhist scriptures. The Buddha's teachings themselves should be our guide in the practice. If we follow our own way or the method of someone else instead of the Buddha's way, we will not reach the goal.

In this Book I do not pretend to give a complete outline of the Buddha's teachings. My purpose is to draw the reader to the teachings themselves and to the practice in accordance with the teachings. I want to ask the reader to read this book with discrimination and to investigate himself the Buddhist scriptures. By our own practice we can prove whether the way we follow is right or wrong. If we intend to develop vipassanā the result should be more understanding of the realities which appear at the present moment through the five senses and the mind and less clinging to the concept of self. In the final analysis the reader will have to find out himself and to decide for himself about the path he wants to follow in his life. I would like to ask the reader to consider whether this book is a guide for him to the teachings and to the practice.

One may have doubts about mental development in daily life Many people say that they have no free time to apply themselves to it they complain that in this hectic time there is not any moment of quietness no possibility of having concentration of mind. They think that they should retire from worldly life in order to develop the mind. When we study what the Buddha taught about mental development we will see that there can be mental development in daily life. For samatha one needs a quiet place and free time Vipassanā however is a way of mental development which can be cultivated at any moment as of our daily life. The Buddha taught vipassanā to monks and laypeople to be developed during their daily activities Monks who are occupied with the study of Pali with the teaching of dhamma with writing with the building of a temple and laypeople who are occupied with their families and the earning of a living they all can be mindful of the realities appearing through eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body-sense and mind-door. Is there not seeing hearing, thinking, hardness, motion, happiness or unhappiness while one is performing one s task and can there not be mindfulness of those characteristics when they appear "Did the Buddha say that there are moments that we should not be mindful?"

This book was written in Thailand where I lived for some years I experienced that "to reside in a suitable location" is the greatest blessing (Maha-Mangalasutta) Thailand was the country where I met the "wise person", the "good friend in dhamma", who led me to the Buddha’s teachings, who pointed out the way to develop the eightfold path It is a great blessing to live in a country where the dhamma is taught and practiced. In Thailand one can meet many people who do not set a limit to their generosity, be they rich or poor Generosity is an essential virtue when there is still stinginess the wrong view of self is hard to eradicate. How can we become detached from the concept of self if we still hold tight to our property? In Thailand one is inspired to greater generosity.

Many people in Thailand know the value of kusala and they appreciate the kusala cittas of others. Doing wholesome deeds and appreciating the wholesome deeds of others are ways people can help each other to have more wholesomeness in life I have experienced this in Thailand.

 The writing of this book would not have been possible without the assistance of Mrs Sujin Boriharnwanaket who gave me such valuable advice and who translated the text into the Thai language. The chapters written in the way of question and answer are real life the questions were posed by people who were confronted with many problems in the practice. I found by my own experience that the practice IS very subtle, that the clinging to the notion of self and the desire for result can easily lead us astray make us follow the wrong path instead of the right path.

When I wrote this book I thought of many people who want to know the truth about themselves. I found Dhamma the greatest blessing in life and therefore I want to share with others what I learned from the teaching and the practice.

Hoping that this book can help them to find the path leading to real peace:

May the Dhamma be the greatest blessing in our lives,

Nina van Gorkom.

Nina van Gorkom
Konijonlean 49
Wassenaar

Holland




The Greatest Blessings

In the 'Maha-Mangala-Sutta' (The Greatest Blessings, Sutta-Nipata II, 4, Khuddaka Nikaya) we read that a deva came to see the Buddha when he was staying at Anathapindika's monastery in the Jeta Grove, and asked him what the greatest blessings were. In reply the Buddha spoke to him about the greatest blessings. All the blessings of a life full of Dhamma are to be found in this sutta.

We read:

Not to associate with the foolish, but to associate with the wise; and to honour those who are worthy of honour- this is the greatest blessing.
To reside in a suitable locality, to have done meritorious actions in the past and to set oneself in the right course- this is the greatest blessing.
To have much learning, to be skilful in handicrafts, well-trained in discipline, and to be of good speech- this is the greatest blessing.
To support mother and father, to cherish wife and children, and to be engaged in peaceful occupation- this is the  greatest blessing.
To be generous in giving, to be righteous in conduct, to help one's relatives, and to be blameless in action- this is the greatest blessing.
To loathe evil and abstain from it, to refrain from intoxicants, and to be steadfast in virtue- this is the greatest blessing.
To be respectful, humble, contented and grateful; and to listen to the Dhamma on due occasions- this is the greatest blessing.
To be patient and obedient, to associate with monks and to have religious discussion on due occasions - this is the greatest blessing.
Self-restraint, a holy and pure life, the perception of the Noble Truths and the realisation of Nibbana- this is the greatest blessing.
A mind unruffled by worldly conditions, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, full of peace- this is the greatest blessing.
Those who thus abide, ever remain invincible, in happiness established. These are the greatest blessings.

 

'Not to associate with the foolish, but to associate with the wise; and to honour those who are worthy of honour' are the first blessings. The last blessings, which are the blessings of the arahat, cannot be attained if one does not have the first blessings. If one does not know the right conditions for enlightenment, nibbana cannot be realised. There are four conditions for enlightenment, the first of which is, association with the 'righteous person; the second, listening to Dhamma; the third, 'wise consideration' of Dhamma; and the fourth, practising Dhamma (Samyutta Nikaya, Maha-vagga, Kindred Sayings on Stream-winner, Chapter I, par. 5). We cannot hear Dhamma, investigate the truth of it and practise it, unless we have met the right person who can point out to us the way to the Buddha's teachings.

Do we want to associate with foolish people or with wise people? Is it of no use to apply ourselves to mental development it we do not scrutinize ourselves first with regard to this question. We do not inclined to associate with people who have the same ideas and the same likes and dislikes as ourselves. Our inclinations are like elements; they arise by conditions. The same elements attract each other. We read in the 'Niddana-vagga' (Samyutta Nikaya, Kindred Saying on Elements, Chapter XIV, par 14):


Through an element it is, monks, that beings flow together, meet together. Beings of low tastes flow together, meet together with them of low tastes. They of virtuous tastes flow together, meet together with them of virtuous tastes. So have they done in the past. So will they do in the future. So do they now in the present.



When we are together with someone for a long time we cannot help being influenced by him. If we have foolish friends, who do not know the value of kusala, who act and speak in an unwholesome way, it is to our detriment. We may not notice that we are under their influence, but gradually we may find ourselves following their ways. If we have friends who know the value of kusala, who are generous, perform good deeds and speak in a wholesome way, it encourages us to more wholesomeness. The Buddha often pointed out the dangers of evil friendship and the benefit of righteous friendship.
Fools do not know what is wholesome and what in unwholesome. They praise what should not be praised and do not give honour to those who should be honoured. For example, high esteem is given to the most beautiful woman in the country or the world, or to persons who have the greatest skill in the field of sports, or to the best actor or musician. Should we disapprove of people who have beauty, strength or skill? We cannot force ourselves not to admired them, but if we have right understanding fo kusala and akusala, we will know whether it is wholesome or unwholesome to be attached to beauty, strength and skill. We will know whether these things lead to the welfare of ourselves and others or not.

How confused is our life when we have not heard about Dhamma. We do not know what is wholesome and what is unwholesome; we do not know about cause and effect in life. When we suffer we do not understand why it had to happen to us. In everyone's life there are experiences of gain and loss, honour and dishonour, praise and blame, happiness and misery. These are called in the teachings the eight 'worldly conditions' ( lokadhamma).

We read in the 'Anguttara Nikaya' (Book of the Eights, Chapter I, par. 5):


Monks, these eight worldly conditions obsess the world; the world resolves around these eight worldly conditions. What eight?
 Gain and loss, fame and obscurity, blame and praise, contentment and pain....



How susceptible we are to those worldly conditions. We are so sensitive to the way other people treat us. We attach great importance to whether we receive blame or praise and whether we are honoured or not. If we do not receive the honour we think is due ot us we feel slighted. We have feelings of bitterness towards those who teat us badly. If we do not make the career in life we were hoping for, or if work is assigned to us which we consider to be beneath our dignity, we feel frustrated. There are many things which make us feel irritated, depressed or angry. Is there ever a day when everything goes according to our wishes for the whole day, a day full of perfect happiness? When we do not have right understanding we are obsessed by the 'worldly conditions'; we are foolish people.
The Buddha pointed out the dangers of being enslaved to these worldly conditions. To what does this lead? It leads to an unhappy rebirth. Devadatta, who caused a schism in the order and separated from it with five hundred monks, was a fool; he was obsessed by the worldly conditions and corrupted by evil friendship. We read in the 'Anguttara Nikaya' (Book of the Eights, Chapter I, par. 7, Devadatta) that the Buddha spoke to the monks, while he was staying on Vulture's Peak, not long after the departure of Devadatta:


...Monks, mastered by eight wrong states, Devadatta, with his mind out of control, became one doomed to suffer in hell, in perdition, dwelling there a kalpa irreprievable.
 By what eight?
 Mastered by gain... by loss... by fame... by obscurity... by honour... by lack of honour... by evil intention... by evil friendship, with his mind out of control, Devadatta became one doomed to suffer in hell, in perdition, dwelling there a kalpa, irreprievable...


Fools like Devadatta who are obsessed by worldly conditions cannot teach Dhamma. They want others to follow them blindly. They do not lead people to the Buddha's teachings so that they can investigate the truth for themselves. If we associate with fools we cannot develop right understanding about our life. We will become more obsessed by the 'worldly conditions' and there will be no way for us to eradicate defilements.

The Buddha, 'Teacher of devas and men', taught out of compassion for the world, not in order to have 'gain, honour and praise' in return. He pointed out that it is the Dhamma that is important, not the person who teaches it. We read in the 'Samyutta Nikaya' (Khandha-vagga, Kindred Sayings on Elements, Middle Fifty, Chapter IV, par. 87, Vakkali) about Vakkali who was sick and who had been longing for a long time to set eyes on the Buddha. The Buddha came to see him and taught him Dhamma; he pointed out to Vakkali the impermanence of all conditioned things, so that he could cultivate the eightfold Path. Vakkali then said to the Buddha:


'For a long time, lord, I have been longing to set eyes on the Exalted One, but I had not strength enough in this body to come to see the Exalted One.'
 'Hush, Vakkali! What is there in seeing this vile body of mine? He who see Dhamma, Vakkali, he sees me: he who sees me, Vakkali, he sees Dhamma. Verily, seeing Dhamma, Vakkali, one sees me: seeing me, one sees Dhamma.
 As to this what do you think, Vakkali? Is body permanent or impermanent?'
 'Impermanent, lord.'
 'Wherefore, Vakkali, he who thus sees... he knows "...for life in these conditions there is no hereafter".'


The wise person does not want others to follow him blindly, but he helps them in such a way that they can realize the truth themselves, without being dependent on him; this is the most effective way one can help others. He leads them directly to the Buddha's teachings and encourages them to study the 'Tipitaka' (Vinaya, Suttanta and Abhidhamma). Then they can have 'wise consideration' of the teachings and verify Dhamma themselves. He points out the way by which they can realize for themselves the perception of impermanence. The aim of the Buddha's teachings is to see things as they are. So long as we do not see things as they are we take for happiness what is not happiness, we take for permanent what is impermanent, we take for self what is not self.

We read in the 'Samyutta Nikaya' (Salayattana-vagga, Kindred Sayings on Sense, First Fifty, Chapter III, par. 26, Comprehension):


Without fully knowing, without comprehending the all, monks, without detaching himself from, without abandoning the all, a man is incapable of extinguishing Ill.
 Without fully knowing, without comprehending, without detaching himself from, without abandoning what (all) is a man incapable of extinguishing Ill?
 It is by not fully knowing the eye...objects... eye-consciousness... eye-contact... that pleasant or unpleasant or indifferent feeling ... the ear... sound... the nose... odour... the tongue... savours... the body... touches... the mind... mind-objects... that a man is incapable of extinguishing Ill. This is the all, monks, without fully knowing which ... a man is so incapable.

 But by fully knowing, by comprehending, by detaching himself from, by abandoning the all, one is capable of extinguishing Ill.


The Buddha pointed out time and again the impermanence of seeing, hearing and all the other realities which we experience through the six doors, in order to remind people to be aware of the seeing at this moment, of the hearing at this moment. If we are not mindful of the seeing-consciousness which appears at the present moment or of the other realities appearing now, we will not have a precise knowledge of their characteristics and thus we will not be able to see them as they are. The wise person does not teach a Dhamma which is different from the Buddha's teachings. He does not point out things which do not lead to the goal. He does not discourage people from study and he does not discourage them from being mindful. He encourages them to be mindful of the reality appearing at the present moment, no matter where they are and no matter what they are doing. It is essential to find out whether the person with whom we associate is the right friend in Dhamma or not. If he is not the right person he cannot point out to us the way to see things as they are. We will know that he is the right person if he helps us to know the characteristic of seeing which appears now, of hearing which appears now, and of the other realities which present themselves through the six doors. This is the way the Buddha taught as the one and only way to eradicate the concept of self, to see things as they are. When there is less attachment to the concept of self we know from our own experience that association with the wise is the greatest blessing.

To honour those who are worthy of honour is the greatest blessing. The Buddha, the Dhamma, the Sangha are worthy of honour. The wise person who taught us the development of the eightfold Path is worthy of honour. How can we honour those who are worthy of honour in the most appropriate way? We feel deep gratitude to the Buddha and we want to give expression to our gratitude. We can honour him by following his last words: 'Transient are all the elements of being! Strive with earnestness!' (Maha-Parinibbana-sutta, Digha Nikaya). We should not be heedless. We are not heedless if we are mindful at this moment and there would be no way to eradicate defilements at all. The whole purpose of the teachings is the eradication of defilements through the development of wisdom. Therefore, each moment of mindfulness is the highest possible form of respect to the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha.

'To reside in suitable location' is the greatest blessing. We cannot meet the good friend in Dhamma in just any place; wise people are rare in the world. It is a great blessing to live in a country where Dhamma is taught and practised, so that we have an opportunity to know the Buddha's teachings. There are many things that have to coincide in order that we meet the right person. It not by mere chance that we meet him; it is conditioned by kamma.

When we meet a wise person we may not be ready to receive Dhamma. It may not be the right time for us to listen to Dhamma; we may not be capable yet of 'wise consideration' of the teachings. Accumulations of wholesome deeds are very helpful for making us ready for the receiving of Dhamma. 'To have done meritorious deeds in the past' is the greatest blessing. We read in the 'Thera-Theri-gatha' that the men and women in the Buddha's time who attained enlightenment had accumulated meritorious deeds for aeons and that they had listened to Dhamma preached by Buddhas of former times. We read about Subha (Commentary to the 'Theri-gatha,' Canto XII, 70, Subbha, Paramattha-Dipani Thera-Theri-gatha Atthakatha):


She, too, having made her resolve under former Buddhas, and accumulating good of age-enduring efficacy, so that she had progressively planted the root of good and accumulated the conditions of emancipation, was, in this Buddha era reborn at Rajagaha...


When we see the many conditions necessary for wisdom to reach maturity we will be less inclined to think that it is self who develops the eightfold Path. When we read about the accumulated good 'of age-enduring efficacy' of men and women in the Buddha's time and when we consider how they had listened time and again to Dhamma preached by former Buddhas, before they met the Buddha Gotama and attained enlightenment, we are reminded not to be heedless at the present time.

The 'Maha-Mangala-sutta' tells us about the blessings of a life full of Dhamma. We read about loving-kindness in the relationship between parents and children, between husband and wife, between relatives. We read about self-restraint, a holy and pure life. When we read these words we may feel discouraged and think that we shall never be able to practise what the Buddha taught. We would like to have less lobha, dosa and moha; but can we force ourselves not to be attached to pleasant things, not to be disturbed by unpleasant things? We cannot force ourselves to b 'righteous in conduct', 'to abstain from evil', 'to be steadfast in virtue'. Will all these blessings of a life full of Dhamma ever be attainable?

As long as there is the concept of self there will be no end to lobha, dosa and moha. Our many defilements are the real cues of the 'dukkha' in our life, day after day. We should be clear in our mind as to what we really want in our life: do we want to accumulate more defilements or do we want to have less defilements? If we want to eradicate defilements we should develop the eightfold Path. When there is mindfulness of nama and rupa the notion of self will be gradually eradicated. With the development of the eightfold path a radical change comes into our life.

The Buddha taught Maha-satipatthana (the Applications of Mindfulness) to monks, nuns, laymen and women layfollowers. As regards the life of the monks, the Vinaya should not be separate from Maha-satipatthana. In the Buddha's time the Vinaya and Maha-satipatthana were not separated. We read in the 'Maha-Mangala-sutta' that one of the greatest blessings is 'To be well-trained in the discipline' (Vinaya). The Commentary to this sutta (Paramatthajotika, to the Sutta-Nipata) speaks about the discipline of the layman (abstinence from the ten immoral actions) and about the discipline of the monk.  The monk who develops the eightfold Path will have a deeper understanding of the Vinaya and he will observe the rules more perfectly. Each detail of the Vinaya is full of meaning, because the rules support the welfare of the Sangha and help the monk to lead a pure life; the rules help him to be considerate in his speech and actions, to cause no trouble to others. The Vinaya teaches the monk to be watchful in body, speech and mind. When one develops mindfulness there is watchfulness as regards the six doors. When there is mindfulness of nama and rupa we are less infatuated by what we see, hear, smell, taste, touch and perceive through the mind-door. We learn to know our subtle defilements and the danger of even these defilements. The monk who develops mindfulness will have a deeper respect for the rules of the Vinaya which remind him to be watchful, seeing danger in even the slightest faults. Thus we see that Vinaya and Maha-satipatthana should not be separated.

The monk who develops the eightfold Path and attains enlightenment will not leave the order any more and return to the 'lower life'. We read in the 'Samyutta Nikaya' (Maha-vagga, Book I, Chapter VI, par. 12) that the Buddha spoke by way of simile about the monk who will not return to the layman's life; he said that the river Ganges, tending towards the east, cannot be made to change its course and tend towards the west.

We read:


Just so, monks, if the rajah's royal ministers or his friends or boon companions or kinsmen or blood relatives were to come to a monk who is cultivating and making much of the ariyan eightfold way, and were to seek to entice him with wealth, saying: 'Come, good man! Why should these yellow robes torment you? Why parade about with shaven crown and bowl? Come! Return to the lower life and enjoy possessions and do deeds of merit.'- for that monk so cultivating and making much of the ariyan eightfold way, return to the lower life is impossible. Why so? Because, monks, that monks heart has for many a long day been bent on detachment, inclined to detachment, turned towards detachment, so that there is no possibility for him to return to the lower life....


The eightfold Path changes the lives of monks and laypeople. It changes the relationship between parents and children, husband and wife, relatives and friends. There is bound to be attachment and displeasure or anger in one's relationship with others, but when we develop mindfulness there are more conditions for alobha (generosity) instead of lobha, for adosa (kindness) instead of displeasure or anger. When other people treat us badly there is less the concept of a self who suffers or the concept of another person who treats us badly. There are only nama and rupa arising by conditions; there is not this or that person.  We are less susceptible to gain and loss, honour and dishonour, blame and praise, happiness and misery. One day there is blame, the next day there is praise, but receiving blame or praise is only nama and rupa arising because of conditions and falling away immediately. It is unavoidable that there be both pleasant and unpleasant experiences in life; the more we see that they arise by conditions the less we will take them for self.

Those who are arahats have a mind 'unruffled by worldly conditions', they are 'from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, full of peace- this is greatest blessing.' The harass have become invulnerable; nothing can disturb them any more. The sutta continues: 'Those who thus abide, ever remain invincible, in happiness established. These are the greatest blessings.'

We are not free from sorrow, but when wisdom realizes a characteristic of nama or rupa, there is at that moment no fear, anxiety or restlessness; there is peace. Is it not true that wisdom brings contentment, be it only for a moment. At times we may feel discouraged; we may think that the eightfold Path is not for us and that we are far from the realization of the truth. We should, however, remember that the Buddha became enlightened and taught the truth for our welfare and happiness. The Buddha did not teach anything which cannot be realized. When we develop the eightfold Path we come to know ourselves, our daily life. In this way we may experience the great blessings of the Dhamma which transforms our life.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 12:32:09 PM by Johann »
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Offline Johann

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Und hier der erste, noch nicht korrekturgelesene Abschnitt der händischen Aufzeichnungen in deutsch:

Quote from: Samana Johann
Vorwort Für Leute die nach Thailand kommen und Buddhismus studieren wollen, ist es schwierig herauszufinden, wie und wo man beginnen sollte. Sie hören verschiedene Erklärungen der Lehren, und werden mit unterschiedlicher Art der Ausübung konfrontiert. Es ist schwer "den Weisen" zu finden, der einem helfen kann, die Lehren Buddhas zu studieren und der es vermag die Art der Ausübung so aufzuzeigen, daß sie im Einklang mit den Lehren sind.
Viele Menschen, die Buddhas Lehren kennen lernen, möchten sich sogleich daran setzen, die mentale Entwicklung zu lernen, um das Ziel der Lehre zu erreichen. Sie wollen "Meditation" entwickeln, ohne zuvor die Lehren Buddhas zu studieren und so wissen sie nicht, daß die mentale Entfaltung sowohl Samatha (Stillemediation) als auch Vipassanā (Einsichtsmeditation) beinhaltet. Sie wissen nicht, daß die Ausübung von Samatha und Vipassanā unterschiedlich ist, und das diese zu unterschiedlichen Ergebnissen führen. Wenn wir vor der mentalen Entfaltung, nicht die Lehren Buddhas studieren, ist es uns nicht möglich rechtes Verständnis über die Ausübung zu haben und wir wissen nicht, ob die Ausübung Buddhas Vorgaben entspricht oder nicht.
Ich habe Leute getroffen, die nicht wirklich wußten, welche Art der Meditation sie am Entwickeln waren und zu welchem Ziel diese führe. Ihre Ziel war Friede im Geist, aber anstelle Frieden im Geist zu finden, wurden diese sehr verwirrt. Die Lehren sind so subtil. Man muß sie wahrlich studieren und sie genau und umsichtig besinnen, um herauszufinden, was Buddha im Bezug auf mentale Entfaltung lehrte.
Der Buddha, welcher Erleuchtung fand und all diese Dinge klar wußte, ist wahrlich unser Lehrer. Er hinterließ uns seine Lehren im "Tipitaka", den buddhistischen Schriften. Die Lehren Buddhas selbst sollten unser Führer in unserer Ausübung sein. Wenn wir unseren eigenen Weg gehen oder der Methode von jemand anderem folgen, anstelle Buddhas Pfad, werden wir das Ziel nicht erreichen.
Mit diesem Buch beabsichtige ich nicht, eine vollständige Erklärung über Buddhas Lehren zu geben. Meine Absicht ist es, den Leser direkt zu den Lehren selbst zu führen und und damit im Einklang mit den Lehren selbt zu üben. Ich bitte den Leser dieses Buches kritisch zu lesen, und selbst die buddhistischen Schriften zu erforschen. Mit unserer eigenen Praxis können wir prüfen, ob der Weg, den wir folgen, richtig oder falsch ist. Wenn wir Vipassanā zu entwickeln beabsichtigen, sollte das Ergebnis mehr Verständnis der Realitäten, welche im gegenwärtigen Moment, über die fünf Sinne und den Geist, aufkommen, bekommen, und weniger an Konzepten über Selbt anhaften. In der abschließenden Analyse muß der Leser selbst herausfinden, welchem Pfad er in seinem Leben folgen möchte und dazu bedarf es, den Weg kennen zu lernen. Ich möchte den Leser dazu einladen, herauszufinden, ob dieses Buch ein Führer zu den Lehren und zur Ausübung ist.
Man mag seine Zweifel gegenüber mentaler Entfaltung im täglichen Leben haben. Viele sagen, das sie keine freie Zeit haben, um sich selbt dem anzunehmen. Sie beschweren sich, daß in diesen hektischen Zeiten, keinerlei Moment der Stille ist, daß da keinerlei Möglichkeit ist, einen konzentrierten Geist zu haben. Sie denken, daß sie sich vom weltlichen Leben abwenden müßten, um den Geist zu entfalten. Wenn wir damit beginnen, zu studieren, was der Buddha über mentale Entfaltung lehrte, werden wir sehen, das mentale Entwicklung im täglichen Leben möglich ist. Für Samatha benötigt man einen stillen Ort und freie Zeit. Vipassanā hingegen, ist eine Art der mentalen Entwicklung, die wir in jedem Moment des täglichen Lebens entwickeln können. Buddha lehrte Vipassanā an Mönche und Laien, welche während der täglichen Aktivitäten entfaltet werden kann. Mönche, die vom Pali-Studium, dem Lehren von Dhamma, dem Errichten eines Tempels, vereinnahmt sind und Laien, die von ihrer Familie und dem Verdienen ihres Lebensunterhaltes vereinnahmt sind, sie alle können achtsam gegenüber den Realitäten sein, die über Augen, Ohren, die Nase, die Zunge, Körperempfindungen, und der Tür des Geistes erscheinen. Ist da kein Sehen, Hören, Denken, Härteempfinden, Bewegung, Freude und Unfreude, während man seine Aufgaben erfüllt, und vermag da nicht Achtsamkeit gegenüber diesen Eigenschaften, wenn diese aufkommen, sein? Sprach Buddha davon, daß es Momente gibt, in welchen man nicht achtsam sein sollte?
Dieses Buch wurde in Thailand, während ich dort für ein paar Jahre lebte, geschrieben. Ich erlebte, daß, an einem passenden Ort zu verweilen, der größte Segen (Mahā-Maṅgalasutta) ist.
Thailand war das Land, in dem ich die "weise Person" traf, den guten Freund im Dhamma, der mir den Weg aufzeigte, um den achtfachen Pfad zu entwickeln. Es ist ein großer Segen, in Thailand zu leben, wo Dhamma gelehrt und ausgeübt wird. In Thailand kann man zahlreiche Menschen treffen, welche Großzügigkeit keinerlei Schranken setzen, mögen sie reich oder arm sein. Großzügigkeit ist eine essentielle Tugend: Wenn da immer noch Geiz ist, ist die falsche Sichtweise über Selbst schwer zu bereinigen. Wie können wir uns von dem Konzept eines Selbst lösen, wenn wir noch immer fest an unserem Eigentum hängen? In Thailand wird man zu großer Großzügigkeit inspiriert.
Viele Leute in Thailand kennen den Wert von kusalā und loben die kusalā cittas anderer. Heilsame Handlungen zu vollbringen und das Befürworten von Heilsamen Handlungen anderer, sind Wege mit denen sich Menschen gegenseitig helfen können, mehr heilsames in ihren Leben zu haben. Ich durfte dies in Thailand erleben.
Das Schreiben dieses Buches währe ohne die Hilfestellung von Frau Sujin Boriharnwanaket nicht möglich gewesen, die mir so viele wertvolle Anregungen gab, daß ihnen dieses Buch helfen möge den Pfad zu finden, der uns zu Frieden führt.


 
Möge das Dhamma der größte Segen in unserem Leben sein.


 
Nina Van Gorkom


 
 Die größten Segen

 
Im Mahā-Maṅgalasutta (Die größten Segen, Sutta Nipāta II, 4, Khunddaka Nikāya) lesen wir, daß ein Deva den Buddha aufsuchte, während dieser in Anāthapinḍikas Kloster, im Jetahain, verweilte und ihn fragte, was den die größten Segen sein. Als Antwort sprach Buddha über die größten Segen zu ihm. Alles Heil eines Lebens voller Dhamma ist hier in diesem Sutta zusammengefaßt. Wir lesen:


 
 "Sich nicht mit Dummen abzugeben, jedoch mit Weisen zu verkehren und jene zu ehren, die des Ehrens würdig sind: dies ist der größte Segen.
 An einem passenden Ort verweilen, verdienstvolle Handlungen in der Vergangenheit vollbracht zu haben und sich selbst auf die rechte Fährte zu bringen: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Belehrt zu sein, geschickt im Handwerk, in Disziplin gut geübt und von guter Sprache zu sein: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Mutter und Vater zu unterstützen, Frau und Kinder zu verehren und friedvollen Unternehmungen nachzugehen: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Großzügig im Geben zu sein, rechtschaffen im Verhalten, den Verwandten zu helfen und tadellos im Handel zu sein: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Schlechtes verworfen und davon abzustehen, von Berauschendem fern zu bleiben und standhaft in Tugend zu sein: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Respektvoll, demütig, bescheiden und dankbar zu sein und das Dhamma zu passender Gelegenheit hören: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Geduldig und zuvorkommend zu sein, mit Mönchen zu verkehren und religiöse Diskussionen zu passender Zeit zu tun: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Gezügelt, ein heiliges und reines Leben, die Vorstellung über die edlen Wahrheiten und der Verwirklichung von Nibbāna: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Einen Geist unerschüttert von weltlichen Umständen, von Kummer befreit, von Veruntrübungen gereinigt, voller Frieden: dies ist der größte Segen.
 Jene so verweilend, verbleiben stets unbezwingbar in Glückseligkeit eingerichtet: dies sind die größten Segen."


 
"Sich nicht mit Dummen abzugeben, jedoch mit Weisen zu verkehren und jene zu ehren, die des Ehrens würdig sind: dies ist der größte Segen", sind die ersten Segen. Die letzten Segen, welche jene eines Arahats sind, können nicht erreicht werden, wenn man die ersten Segen nicht hat. Wenn jemand die rechten Grundlagen für Erleuchtung nicht kennt, kann Nibbāna nicht verwirklicht werden. Da sind vier Grundlagen für Erleuchtung, wovon die erste das Abgeben mit den "rechtschaffenen Personen" ist; die zweite, das Dhamma zu hören; die dritte, "weise Besinnung/Erwägung des Dhammas" und die vierte, die Ausübung des Dhammas (Saṁyutta Nikāya, Mahā-vaggam, Kindred Saying on Stream-Winner, Kapitel I, Abschnitt 5). Wir können kein Dhamma hören, die Wahrheit dessen untersuchen und es praktizieren, solange wir nicht die richtige Person getroffen haben, die uns den Weg zu Buddhas Lehren aufzeigen kann.
Mögen wir uns mit dummen Leuten abgeben, oder mit weisen? Es ist von keinerlei Nutzen, wenn wir uns der mentalen Entfaltung zuwenden, und uns nicht zuerst über diese Frage Wahrheit verschafft haben. Wir neigen dazu uns mit Leuten selber Gedanken und gleichen Vorzügen und Widerstrebungen, gleich den eigenen, abzugeben. Unsere Neigungen sind wie Elemente, die Aufgrund von Bedingungen aufkommen. Gleiche Elemente ziehen einander an.Wir lesen im "Niddanavagga" (Saṁyutta Nikāya, Kindred Saying on Elements, Kapitel XIV, Abschnitt 14):


 
 "Aufgrund eines Elementes ist es, Mönche, daß Lebewesen zusammen strömen, einander treffen. Lebewesen niedrigen Geschmacks strömen zusammen, treffen jene mit niedrigem Geschmack. Jene von tugendhaftem Geschmack strömen zusammen, treffen jene mit tugendhaftem Geschmack. So taten sie dies in der Vergangenheit. So werden sie es in der Zukunft tun. So tun sie es jetzt, in der Gegenwart."
 

 
Wenn wir mit jemandem für längere Zeit zusammen sind, kommen wir nicht aus, von dieser Person beeinflußt zu werden. Wenn wir dumme Freunde haben, die den Wert von kusalā nicht kennen, die in unheilsamer Weise handeln und sprechen, ist dies zu unserem Schwinden. Es mag sein, daß wir nicht bemerken, unter ihrem Einfluß zu stehen, jedoch nach und nach werden wir ihren Wegen folgen. Wenn wir Freunde haben, die den Wert von kusalā kennen, die großzügig sind, gute Handlungen vollbringen und auf heilsame Weise sprechen, regt uns dieses zu mehr Heilsamkeit an. Der Buddha zeigte oft die Gefahr von schlechter und die Vorzüge von rechtschaffener Freundschaft auf. Dummköpfe wissen nicht was heilsam und was unheilsam ist. Sie leben was nicht lebenswert ist und ehren jene, die geehrt werden sollten, nicht. Große Wertschätzung wird der schönsten Frau des Landes, oder der Welt, gegeben, oder Personen mit großem Geschick im Bereich des Sports, oder an die besten Schauspieler oder Musiker. Sollten wir Leute die Schönheit besitzen, Kraft, oder Geschicke, ablehnen? Wir können uns nicht dazu drängen, ihnen nicht zugeneigt zu sein, aber wenn wir rechtes Verständnis von kusalā und akusalā haben, werden wir wissen, ob es nun heilsam oder unheilsam ist, an Schönheit, Kraft und Geschicken anzuhaften.
Wie verwirrend unser Leben ist, wenn wir Dhamma nicht gehört haben. Wir wissen nicht, was heilsam und was unheilsam ist, wir wissen nichts über Ursache und Wirkung im Leben. Wenn wir leiden, wissen wir nicht warum uns das passiert mußte. In unserem Leben sind da Gewinn und Verlust, Ehre und Spott, Lob und Tadel, Glück und Elend. Diese werden in der Lehre die Acht "weltlichen Bedingungen [Zustände/Umstände]" (loka-dhamma) genannt.
Wir lesen im "Aṅguttara Nikāya" (Buch der Achter, Kapitel I, Abschnitt5):


 
 "Mönche, diese acht weltlichen Umstände beherrschen die Welt, die Welt fügt sich rund um diese acht weltlichen Umstände. Welche acht? Gewinn und Verlust, Ruhm und Schmach, Tadel und Lob, Zufriedenheit und Schmerz."
 

 
Wie wir doch diesen weltlichen Umständen ausgeliefert sind. Wir sind so empfindlich gegenüber der Art, wie uns andere Leute behandeln. Wir heften große Wichtigkeit daran, ob nun von anderen getadelt oder gelobt zu werden. Wenn wir die Ehre, von der wir denken, das sie uns gebührt, nicht empfangen, fühlen wir uns zerstört. Wir haben Gefühle von Bitterlichkeit gegenüber anderen, die uns schlecht behandeln. Wenn wir die Karriere, die wir uns im Leben erwarten, nicht machen und wenn uns Arbeit zugeteilt wird, von der wir meinen, daß sie unter unserer Würde steht, sind wir frustriert. Da gibt es viele Gründe für uns, uns irritiert, gedrückt und verärgert zu fühlen. Ist da ein Tag, an dem alles entsprechend unseren Wünschen verläuft, ein perfekter Tag? Wenn wir kein rechtes Verständnis haben, sind wir eingenommen von den "weltlichen Umständen", sind wir wie dumme Leute.
Der Buddha zeigte die Gefahr, von den "weltlichen Umständen" gefangen zu sein, auf. Zu was führen diese? Es führt zu einer unglücklichen Wiedergeburt. Devadatta, der eine Spaltung des Ordens verursachte und sich mit fünfhundert Mönchen absonderte, war ein Dummkopf. Er war eingenommen von den "weltlichen Umständen" und verleitet von schlechter Freundschaft. Wir lesen im "Aṅguttara Nikāya" (Buch der Achter, Kapitel I, Abschnitt 7, Devadatta), das Buddha zu den Mönchen sprach, während er auf der Geierspitze verweilte, nicht lange nach der Abreise von Devadatta:


 
 ...Mönche, beherrscht von acht falschen Zuständen, wurde Devadatta, mit seinem Geist außer Kontrolle, zu einem der vorgesehen ist, in der Hölle zu leiden, in Verdammnis, dort für ein Kalpa verweilend, unwiderruflich.
 Welchen acht?
 Beherrscht von Gewinn... von Verlust... von Ruhm... von Schmach... von Ehrung... von Abwesenheit von Ehrung... von schlechter Freundschaft, mit seinem Geist außer Kontrolle, wurde Devadatta zu einem, vorgesehen in der Hölle zu leiden, in Verdammnis, dort für ein Kalpa verweilend, unwiderruflich..."
 

 
Dummköpfe wie Devadatta, die von weltlichen Umständen eingenommen sind, können Dhamma nicht lehren. Sie wünschen sich, daß andere ihnen blind folgen. Sie leiten Leute nicht zu Buddhas Lehren, sodaß diese die Wahrheit für sich selbst ergründen könnten. Wenn wir uns mit Dummköpfen abgeben, können wir zu keinem rechten Verständnis über unser Leben gelangen. Wir werden noch einvernommener von den "weltlichen Umständen" werden und da besteht kein Weg für uns diese Unreinheiten auszulöschen.
Der Buddha, "Lehrer der Devas und Menschen", lehrte aus Mitgefühl für die Welt, nicht um "Gewinn, Ehrung und Lob" im Gegenzug zu erlangen. Er zeigte auf, daß das Dhamma wichtig ist und nicht die Person die es lehrt. Wir lesen im Saṁyutta Nikāya (Khandha-vaggo, Kindred Sayings on Elements, Middle Fifty IV, Abschnitt 87, Vakkali) über Vakkali, der war und schon seit längerer Zeit danach sehnte, den Buddha zu sehen. Buddha kann zu ihm, und lehrte ihm Dhamma. Er zeigte ihm die Unbeständigkeit aller bedingten Dinge auf, sodaß er den achtfachen Pfad kultivieren konnte. Wir lesen, daß Vakkali zu Buddha sagte:


 
 "Für lange Zeit, Herr, sehnte ich danach den Erhabenen Buddha zu erblicken, aber ich hatte nicht genug Kraft, um den Erhabenen Buddha anzutreffen, aufzuwarten und zu sehen."
 "Ach, Vakkali! Was gibt es da an diesem, meinem wertlosen Körper zu sehen? Jener, der Dhamma sieht, Vakkali, jener sieht mich, jener, der mich sieht, Vakkali, jener sieht Dhamma. Wahrlich, Dhamma sehend, Vakkali, sieht man mich, mich sehend, sieht man Dhamma.
 "Insofern, Vakkali, was denkt Ihr? Ist Körper beständig, oder unbeständig?"
 "Unbeständig, Herr."
 "Ist Gefühl... Vorstellung... , die Gestaltungen... , ist Bewußtsein beständig, oder unbeständig?"
 "Unbeständig, Herr."
 "Weshalb, Vakkali, jener, der dies sieht... jener weiß:... für ein Leben in diesen Umständen, ist da keines danach."
 

 
Die weise Person möchte nicht, daß ihr andere blind folgen, doch hilft sie ihnen, daß sie die Wahrheit für sich selbst verwirklichen können und nicht von ihr abhängig sein brachen. Dies ist die wirkungsvollste Hilfe, die jemand anderen geben kann. Sie leiten sie direkt zu Buddhas Lehren und halten sie an, den "Tipitaka" zu studieren (Vinaya, Suttanta und Abhidhamma). Dann können diese "weise Erwägungen" über die Lehren vollziehen und Dhamma für sich selbst ausmachen. Sie zeigt den Weg, über welchen sie für sich selbst die Vorstellung von Unbeständigkeit verwirklichen können. Das Ziel Buddhas Lehren ist es, Dinge zu sehen, wie sie sind. Solange wir die Dinge nicht so sehen, wie sie sind, sehen wir jenes als Freude und, was nicht freudvoll ist, wir sehen als beständig an, was unbeständig ist, wir sehen Selbst in dem was Nicht-Selbst ist.
Wir lesen im Saṁyutta Nikāya (Kindred Sayings on sense, First Fifty, Kapitel III, Abschnitt 26, Verständnis)


 
 "Ohne vollständig zu kennen, ohne vollständig das Alles zu verstehen, Mönche, ohne sich davon loszulösen, ohne das Alles abzulegen, ist ein Mann unfähig Krankheiten auszulöschen.
 Ohne vollständig zu kennen, ohne zu verstehen, ohne sich zu loszulösen, ohne was abzulegen, ist ein Mann unfähig Krankheit auszulöschen?
 Es ist auf Grund des nicht vollständigen Kennens des Auges... Gegenständen... Augenbewußtsein... Augenkontakt... dieses angenehme oder unangenehme oder unklare Gefühl... das Ohr... Klang... die Nase... Duft... die Zunge... Geschmack... den Körper... Berührung... den Geist... Geistesgegenstände..., das ein Mann unfähig ist Krankheit auszulöschen. Dies ist das Alles, Mönche, ohne jenes vollständig zu kennen, ein Mann so unfähig ist.
 Doch mit vollständigem Kennen, mit Verstehen, sich von ihm loslösend, mit dem Ablegen des Alles, ist man fähih die Krankheit auszulöschen."
 

 
Der Buddha zeigte immer wieder die Unbeständigkeit von Sehen, Hören und allen anderen Realitäten, welche wir durch die sechs Tore erfahren, auf, um Leute daran zu erinnern, sich dem Sehen im Moment, dem Hören im Moment, bewußt zu sein. Wenn wir nicht achtsam gegenüber dem Sehbewußtsein, welches im gegenständigen Moment aufkommt, oder anderen Realitäten die nun aufkommen, sind, werden wir kein präzises Wissen über deren Charakteristik haben und somit nicht fähig sein, sie so zu sehen, wie sie sind. Die weise Person lehrt kein Dhamma, daß sich von den Lehren Buddhas unterscheidet. Sie zeichnet keine Dinge heraus, die nicht zum Ziel führen. Sie hält andere dazu an, achtsam gegenüber den Realitäten, wie sie im gegenständigen Moment aufkommen, zu sein, ganz gleich wo sie sich befindet, ganz gleich was sie tut. Es ist essentiell herauszufinden, ob die Person, mit der wir uns abgeben, ein richtiger Freund im Dhamma ist, oder nicht. Wenn er nicht die richtige Person ist, kann er uns den Weg nicht aufzeigen, Dinge so zu sehen, wie sie sind. Wir werden wissen, ob er die richtige Person ist, wenn er uns hilft, die Charakteristik des Sehens, wie es jetzt aufkommt, des Hörens, welches jetzt aufkommt und all der anderen Realitäten, die sich durch die sechs Tore darstellen, kennen zu lernen. Dies ist die Art und Weise die Buddha als den einzigen Weg lehrte, um das Konzept eines Selbst auszulöschen und diese Dinge so zu sehen, wie sie sind. Wenn da wenig Anhaftung an ein Konzept von Selbst ist, wissen wir aus eigener Erfahrung, daß das Abgeben mit Weisen, der größte Segen ist.
Jene ehren, die des Ehrens würdig sind. Der Buddha, das Dhamma und die Sangha, sind der Ehrung würdig. Die weisen Person, die uns die Entfaltung des Achtfachen Pfades lehrte, ist der Ehrung würdig. Wie können wir jene, die der Ehrung würdig sind, in höchst passender Weise ehren? ir fühlen tiefe Dankbarkeit gegenüber dem Buddha und wir wollen diesem Ausdruck geben. Wir können ihn damit ehren, indem wir seinen letzten Worten folgen: "Vergänglich sind die Elemente des Seins! Strebt gewissenhaft!" (Mahā-Parinibbānasutta, Dīgha Nikāya). Wir sollten nicht gewissenlos sein. Ohne den Lehren des Buddhas, würden wir in diesem Moment nicht achtsam sein und da wäre keinerlei Weg die Unreinheiten, mittels der Entfaltung von Weisheit, auszulöschen. Daher ist jeder Moment der Achtsamkeit die höchste Form des Respektes gegenüber dem Buddha, dem Dhamma und der Sangha.
"An einem passenden Ort verweilen", ist der größte Segen. Wir können den guten Freund im Dhamma nicht an jedem Ort treffen. Es ist ein großer Segen in einem Land zu leben, in dem das Dhamma gelehrt und ausgeübt wird, wodurch wir die Möglichkeit haben, Buddhas Lehren kennen zu lernen. Da sind viele Dinge, die zusammen kommen müssen, sodaß wir die richtige Person treffen können. Es ist nicht bloßer Zufall oder Sache des Glücks, daß wir sie treffen können, es ist durch kamma bedingt.
Es mag sein, daß wir eine weise Person treffen, jedoch noch nicht reif sind Dhamma zu empfangen. Es mag vielleicht nicht die richtige Zeit für uns sein Dhamma zu hören; wir mögen noch nicht fähig sein, "weise Erwägungen" der Lehre zu tun. Die Anhäufung von heilsamen Handlungen sind sehr hilfreich, um uns bereit zu machen, Dhamma zu empfangen. "Verdienstvolle Handlungen in der Vergangenheit vollbracht zu haben", ist größter Segen. Wir lesen im "Thera-Therīgatha", daß ein Mann und eine Frau zu Buddhas Zeiten, welche Erleuchtung erlangt hatten, für Äons verdienstvolle Handlungen angehäuft hatten und das sie dem Dhamma, vorgetragen von Buddhas früherer Zeiten, zugehört hatten. Wir lesen über Subha (Kommentar zu "Therīgatha" Subha, 70, Paramattha-Dipani Thera-Therīgatha Atthakatha): "Auch sie, die ihren Entschluß unter vorhergegangenen Buddhas getan und Gutes für lange Zeit ergibig angehäuft und die Grundlage für die Befreiung zusammengetragen hatte, wurde in diesem Buddha-Zeitalter in Rājagaha geboren..."
Wenn wir die vielen Grundlagen sehen, die dafür notwendig sind, um Weisheit zur Reife zu bringen, werden wir weniger dazu geneigt sein zu denken, daß es Selbst ist, welches den achtfachen Pfad entwickelt. Wenn wir "Gutes für lange Zeit ergibig angehäuft" über den Mann und die Frau in Buddhas Zeiten lesen und bedenken, wie sie immer wieder das Dhamma, gelehrt von vorhergehenden Buddhas anhörten, bevor sie den Buddha Gotama trafen und Erleuchtung erlangen konnten, sind wir erinnert, nicht gewissenlos in der gegenwärtigen Zeit zu sein.
Im Mahā-Maṅgalasutta lesen wir über den Segen eines Lebens voller Dhamma. Wir lesen über liebevolle Güte in der Partnerschaft zwischen Ehemann und Ehefrau, zwischen Verwandten. Wir lesen über Zurückhaltung, einem heiligen und reinen Leben. Wenn wir diese Worte lesen, mag es sein, daß  wir uns entmutigt fühlen und denken, daß wir wohl nie fähig sein werden, Buddhas Gelehrtes auszuüben. Gerne würden wir weniger lobha, dosa und moha haben, doch können wir uns dazu drängen, nicht an angenehmen Dingen anzuhaften und nicht von unangenehmen Dingen gestört zu sein? Wie können uns nicht dazu drängen "rechtschaffen im Verhalten" zu sein, "von Schlechtem abzustehen", "standhaft in Tugend" zu sein. Werden all diese Segen eines Lebens voller Dhamma jemals erreichbar sein?
Solange da ein Konzept von Selbst ist, ist da kein Ende für lobha, dosa und moha. Unsere zahlreichen Unreinheiten sind der wahre Grund für unsere Unzufriedenheit im Leben, Tag für Tag. Wir sollten uns im Geist klar sein, was wir in unserem Leben wirklich wollen: wollen wir uns mehr Unreinheiten anhäufen oder wollen wir weniger davon haben? Wenn wir die Unreinheiten auslöschen wollen, sollten wir den Achtfachen Pfad entwickeln. Wenn da Achtsamkeit gegenüber nāma und rūpa ist, wird der Sinn von Selbst schwinden, bis er ausgelöscht ist. Mit der Entwicklung des Achtfachen Pfades, hat eine radikale Veränderung in unserem Leben begonnen.
Der Buddha lehrte das Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna (Anfügung der Achtsamkeit) an Mönche, Nonnen, Laienmänner und weibliche Laienanhänger. Aus diesem Zusammenhang sollte aus dem Leben der Mönche die Vinaya nicht von Mahā-satipaṭṭhāna getrennt werden. Zu Buddhas Zeiten war Vinaya und das Mahā-satipaṭṭhāna nicht getrennt. Wir lesen im "Mahā-Maṅgalasutta, daß einer der größten Sagen "in Disziplin gut geübt" (Vinaya) ist. Der Kommentar zu dem Sutta (Paramatthajotika, zum Sutta-Nipāta) spricht über die Disziplin von Laien, welche das Abstehen von den zehn unmoralischen Handlungen ist, und über die Disziplin von Mönchen. Der Mönch, der den Achtfachen Pfad entfaltet, wird ein tieferes Verständnis von Vinaya haben und die Regeln perfekter einhalten. Jedes Detail der Vinaya ist voller Bedeutung, denn die Regeln fördern das Wohl der Sangha und helfen den Mönchen ein reines Leben zu führen. Die Regeln helfen ihm bedacht in seinen Werten und Taten zu sein und anderen keine Probleme zu verursachen. Die Vinaya lehrt den Mönchen wachsam in Körper, Sprache und Geist zu sein. Wenn jemand Achtsamkeit entwickelt, ist da Wachsamkeit im Bezug auf die sechs Tore. Wenn wir achtsam gegenüber nāma und rūpa sind, sind wir durch die Geistestore, weniger von dem was wir sehen, hören, riechen, schmecken, berühren und bedenken, vereinnahmt. Wir lernen unsere subtileren Verunreinigungen und auch die Gefahren der subtilen Verunreinigungen kennen. Ein Mönch, der Achtsamkeit entwickelt, wird größeren Respekt gegenüber den Regeln der Vinaya haben, welche ihn daran erinnern, wachsam zu sein und die Gefahr selbst im kleinsten Vergehen zu sehen. Daraus ersehen wir, daß Vinaya und Mahā-satipaṭṭhāna nicht getrennt werden sollten. Ein Mönch, der den Achtfachen Pfad entwickelt und Erleuchtung erreicht, wird den Orden nicht mehr verlassen und zum "niedrigeren Leben" zurückkehren. Wir lesen im Saṁyutta Nikāya (Mahā-vagga, Buch I, Kapitel VI, Abschnitt 12), daß Buddha über den Mönch, der nicht in das Laienleben zurückkehren wird, in Gleichnissen sprach. Er sagte, das der Fluß Ganges, der sich gegen Osten neigt, nicht dazu gebracht werden kann, seine Kurs zu ändern um sich nach Westen zu neigen. Wir lesen:


 
 "Gerade so, Mönche, als ob des Rājahs königliche Minister, oder seine Freunde, oder seine engeren Gefährten, oder sein Gefolge, oder Sippe, zu einem Mönch kämen, der den Achtfachen Ariya-Weg kultiviert und viel aus ihm macht, und versuchten ihn mit Wohlstand zu betören, sagend: "Komm guter Mann! Warum sollten Euch die gelben Roben plagen? Warum mit rasiertem Haupt und Schale herumziehen? Kommt! Kehrt zum niedrigeren Leben zurück und genießt Besitz und vollbringt verdienstvolle Taten", den für den Mönch, der den Achtfachen Ariya-Weg kultiviert und vieles daraus macht, ist das Zurückkehren zum niedrigen Leben unmöglich. Warum dies? Weil, Mönche, sich das Herz für viele lange Tage der Loslösung zugewandt hat, der Loslösung zugeneigt, sodaß da keine Möglichkeit für ihn besteht zum niedrigen Leben zurückzukehren..."
 

 
Der Achtfache Pfad verändert das Leben von Mönchen und Laien. Er verändert die Beziehung zwischen Eltern und Kindern, Ehemann und Ehefrau, Verwandten und Freunden. Da ist Bindung anzuhaften und für Unwohl oder Ärger in Beziehungen, doch wenn Achtsamkeit entfaltet ist, sind da mehr Grundlagen für alobha, oder Großzügigkeit, anstelle von lobha, für adosa oder Güte, anstelle von Unwohlsein und Ärger. Wenn andere Leute uns schlecht behandeln, ist da weniger von dem Konzept eines Selbst, welches leidet, oder das Konzept anderer Personen, die uns schlecht behandeln. Da ist nur nāma und rūpa, die mit Bedingungen aufkommen, da ist nicht diese oder jene Person. Wir sind weniger Gewinn und Verlust, Ehre und Schmach, Tadel und Lob, Freude und Leid, ausgeliefert. An einem Tag ist da Tadel, an einem anderen Tag ist da Lob, doch das erhalten von Tadel und Lob ist bloß nāma und rūpa, aufkommen auf Grund von Bedingungen und unverzüglich wieder abfallend. Es ist unabwendbar, das da beide Erfahrungen im Leben sind, angenehme und unangenehme. Desto mehr wir sehen, daß diese auf Grund von Bedingungen aufkommen, desto weniger werden wir sie für Selbst nehmen.
Jene, die Arahants sind, haben einen Geist, "unbewegt von weltlichen Bedingungen", sie sind "von Kummer befreit, der Verunreinigungen gereinigt, voller Frieden, dies ist der größte Segen." Die Arahants sind unverletzbar geworden, nichts kann sie mehr stören. Das Sutta setzt fort: "Jene, die so verweilen, verbleiben stets unerschütterlich in Glückseligkeit eingerichtet. Dies sind die größten Segen."
Wir sind nicht frei von Kummer, aber wenn Weisheit die Charakteristik von nāma oder rūpa realisiert, ist da in diesem Moment keine Angst, Unruhe oder Rastlosigkeit: da ist Friede. Ist es nicht wahr, das Weisheit Zufriedenheit bringt? Von Zeit zu Zeit mögen wir uns entmutigt fühlen, wir mögen denken, daß der Achtfache Pfad nichts für uns ist und das wir weit davon entfernt sind, die Wahrheiten zu verwirklichen. Wir sollten uns, wie auch immer, daran erinnern, daß Buddha die Erleuchtung erlangte und die Wahrheit für unser Wohl und Glück lehrte. Der Buddha lehrte nichts, daß nicht verwirklicht werden kann. Wenn wir den achtfachen Pfad entwickeln, lernen wir uns und unser tägliches Leben kennen. Dann werden wir die großen Segen des Dhammas erfahren, welche unser Leben verändert.
 

« Last Edit: June 28, 2015, 01:28:14 PM by Johann »
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Text in Englisch und Deutsch auf ZzE,  auch als Pdf zu finden:

Die größten Segen

The Greatest Blessings

Atma markiert das hier soweit als abgeschlossen, wenn auch nicht korrekturgelesen.
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

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