Recent Topics

[November 22, 2019, 11:39:55 PM]

[November 22, 2019, 07:58:37 PM]

[November 22, 2019, 06:35:12 AM]

[November 21, 2019, 12:35:05 PM]

[November 21, 2019, 12:14:27 PM]

[November 21, 2019, 10:36:05 AM]

[November 20, 2019, 12:14:00 PM]

[November 19, 2019, 05:24:09 PM]

[November 19, 2019, 12:32:04 PM]

[November 19, 2019, 10:57:39 AM]

[November 19, 2019, 10:16:06 AM]

[November 18, 2019, 10:31:27 PM]

[November 18, 2019, 09:58:36 PM]

[November 18, 2019, 11:23:38 AM]

[November 18, 2019, 05:58:06 AM]

[November 18, 2019, 05:42:57 AM]

[November 17, 2019, 06:07:26 PM]

[November 17, 2019, 03:35:17 PM]

[November 17, 2019, 11:25:12 AM]

[November 17, 2019, 11:09:54 AM]

[November 16, 2019, 10:06:15 PM]

[November 16, 2019, 06:33:59 PM]

[November 16, 2019, 05:20:48 PM]

[November 16, 2019, 01:45:32 PM]

[November 16, 2019, 06:39:00 AM]

[November 15, 2019, 05:23:35 PM]

[November 15, 2019, 05:19:52 PM]

[November 15, 2019, 06:39:27 AM]

Talkbox

2019 Nov 22 20:01:23
Cheav Villa: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Master Moritz _/\_

2019 Nov 22 19:49:34
Johann: talkbox isn't good for more then Abhivadana, hello... wishes, metta spreading, similar.

2019 Nov 22 19:47:27
Johann: Visitor, as well as Nyom Vivek, can write in topics, maybe start even one. It's, the issue, isn't understandable.

2019 Nov 22 19:40:12
Visitor: 2nd one is unrecoverable and unreachable(forgotten password)

2019 Nov 22 19:38:57
Visitor: 1st email id at the link is deleted

2019 Nov 22 19:33:19
Visitor: Wow! Mr. Mortiz ,so you are working as an Engineer. Might be algorithm over here can be of some use. It's very fast for a server to handle  ;-)  _/\_ buddhaya. https://github.com/Anonymousingly/URA

2019 Nov 22 18:21:55
Moritz: Chom reap leah _/\_ Trying to see how to set up new server. :) Would try to start topic about it soon, possibly taking some days still; now soon usual weekend nightshift work. _/\_

2019 Nov 22 18:18:46
Moritz: Bong Villa _/\_

2019 Nov 22 18:05:26
Johann: Nyom Moritz, Villa

2019 Nov 22 17:27:04
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_

2019 Nov 22 06:39:52
Johann: Nyom Moritz

2019 Nov 22 06:39:22
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_

2019 Nov 22 00:13:18
Vivek: Good Night All,Be happy, meditate in dreams too....from a former wanderer of other sects.

2019 Nov 21 23:40:42
Johann: Nyom Vivek

2019 Nov 21 21:59:49
Visitor: Oh! It worked. Vandami All.

2019 Nov 21 21:58:35
Visitor: Shout, shout, wow, wow,  :o :o *gift* *thumb*

2019 Nov 20 15:54:51
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 20 15:27:02
Johann: Nyom Villa

2019 Nov 20 14:18:59
Johann: A blessed Sila-day today, and may many take to possibility for services toward the tripple Gems while observing Silas.

2019 Nov 20 05:35:14
saddhamma: Avuso Moritz _/\_

2019 Nov 19 21:17:27
Cheav Villa:  :) _/\_

2019 Nov 19 19:13:02
Moritz: Upasaka Sadhamma _/\_

2019 Nov 19 19:12:54
Moritz: Bong Villa _/\_

2019 Nov 19 14:33:28
Johann: Ayasma Moritz

2019 Nov 19 14:18:50
Moritz: Mr. Vivek _/\_

2019 Nov 19 14:03:03
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 19 13:46:22
Moritz: Bong Villa _/\_

2019 Nov 19 07:36:38
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 19 05:28:18
Johann: Being caught in relating, may they find the trace toward Unbond with ease and follow it eager for soon release.

2019 Nov 19 05:25:03
Johann: A meritful, joyful in Dhamma, Sila day today, those undertaking it today.

2019 Nov 18 05:41:01
Moritz: Chom reap leah, for now _/\_ May Bhante have a pleasent day. _/\_

2019 Nov 18 05:22:11
Johann: Nyom Moritz

2019 Nov 18 05:20:39
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_

2019 Nov 16 21:59:56
Moritz: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 16 20:43:25
Johann: Ayasma Moritz

2019 Nov 14 22:46:22
Johann: Atma leaves the paranimmita-vasavatti deva and nimmanarati deva now to find good birth by themself, no more power left.

2019 Nov 14 22:00:48
Cheav Villa: _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 21:39:00
Johann: Duties and Silas are words of same meaning, denoting "proper conduct and giving in ones relations where ne desires to have a good and safe stand"

2019 Nov 14 21:25:51
Cheav Villa:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 21:21:02
Johann: May all have good rest at the end of day, done ones duties or even a blessed done merits after that as well. My person is now off of energy and good to rest as well.

2019 Nov 14 13:43:11
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 14 10:35:51
Johann: Respecting the Devas one gains their respect and protection.

2019 Nov 14 10:34:40
Johann: Bhante. (Meawmane is a spirit from a Server in Bangkok)

2019 Nov 14 10:28:52
Khemakumara: Nyom Meawmane

2019 Nov 14 10:27:53
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante

2019 Nov 13 20:44:51
Cheav Villa:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 13 20:28:20
Johann: Bhante  _/\_ Nyom, Nyom

2019 Nov 13 13:19:14
Cheav Villa: Kana Bhante :) _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 13 11:54:18
Johann: Mahā (written), not moha (following civil transliteration of khmer, very unuseful, better following pali transliteration) "Deluded Wisdom Monastery" could be understood while "Great Wisdom Monastery"  :)

2019 Nov 13 10:22:14
Johann: mudita

2019 Nov 13 09:56:41
Cheav Villa: Kana now at Panha Moha Viheara, waiting for  Bhikkuni

2019 Nov 13 09:47:10
Cheav Villa: Vandami Bhante _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 12 08:01:41
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 12 05:35:02
Khemakumara:  Sīlena nibbutiṁ yanti. Through virtue they go to Unbinding. May it be a fruit-and pathful Uposatha day.

2019 Nov 11 16:41:52
Varado: Happily indeed we live, we, for whom there is [nowhere] anything at all. We will feed on rapture like the Ābhassarā devas. Dh.v.200.

2019 Nov 11 11:40:45
Johann: Ven. Sirs  _/\_ (Kana trust that leave for some rest will not reduce Bhantes releasing joy here)

2019 Nov 11 11:13:48
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 11 11:06:19
Johann: May it be an auspicious end of the Vassa of the Noble ones, a deep Anapanasati day today, for all conducting the full moon uposatha today.

2019 Nov 11 06:00:43
Johann: " Happy/peaceful the area/custom of the Arahats, craving and wandering on having layed aside"?

2019 Nov 11 03:22:11
Johann: Of which would mean what, Lok Ta, if not wishing to use google or not given means?

2019 Nov 10 23:54:03
Varado: Sukhino vata arahanto taṇhā tesaṃ na vijjati _/\_

2019 Nov 10 19:51:07
Khemakumara:  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante Ariyadhammika

2019 Nov 10 17:54:44
Johann: ភនតេ វ៉ាលិ

2019 Nov 10 14:42:47
Johann: Lok Ta  _/\_

2019 Nov 09 16:31:12
Cheav Villa: Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu  :) _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 16:25:14
Johann: May Nyom and all have a safe travel

2019 Nov 09 16:03:41
Cheav Villa: Kana and kids Plan to go to Aural tomorrow, will leave Phnom Penh at 5am  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 15:41:39
Cheav Villa: Vandami Bhante  _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 15:37:40
Johann: Bhante Ariyadhammica, Nyom Villa

2019 Nov 09 15:35:16
Johann: Sadhu

2019 Nov 09 14:56:15
Varado: Homage to the Noble Sangha _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 09 14:55:15
Varado: Blessed is the arising of Buddhas. Blessed is the explaining of the true teaching. Blessed is concord in the community of bhikkhus. Of those in concord, blessed is their practice of austerity.

2019 Nov 09 14:53:06
Johann: Ven Grandfather, Nyom Annaleana,

2019 Nov 09 01:57:47
Moritz: Vandami, Bhante Varado _/\_

2019 Nov 09 01:43:05
Varado: Pūjā ca pūjanīyānaṃ

2019 Nov 09 00:44:14
Johann: Worthy those on path or reached the aim

2019 Nov 08 22:36:29
Varado: Homage to those elder bhikkhus of long-standing who have long gone forth, the fathers and leaders of the Sangha. _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:16:23
Johann: May the Venerables allow my persons leave, running out of battery.  _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:09:51
Johann: Sadhu, Sadhu!

2019 Nov 08 20:09:14
Varado: Homage to Good Friends. For this is the entire holy life. _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 20:07:04
Varado: Homage to the Good Friends. For this is the entire holy life. _/\_ _/\_ _/\_

2019 Nov 08 19:29:09
Varado: Thanks for summary. I send article on milk. Anything else?

2019 Nov 08 18:53:24
Varado: Also greed, hatred, and delusion. Tīni akusalamūlāni: lobho akusalamūlaṃ doso akusalamūlaṃ moho akusalamūlaṃ (D.3.214).

2019 Nov 08 18:36:34
Johann: So does it, so does it, for Bhikkhus, layman, laywoman as well. And what is the root of stinginess? Ingratitude (wrong view).

2019 Nov 08 18:30:56
Varado: Possessing five qualities, a bhikkhuni is deposited in hell as if brought there. What five? She is miserly with dwellings, families, gains, praise, and the Dhamma (A.3.139). Pañcahi bhikkhave dhammehi samannāgatā bhikkhunī yathābhataṃ nikkhittā evaṃ niraye: katamehi pañcahi: Āvāsamaccha

2019 Nov 08 18:23:39
Varado: Macchariya for lodgings, maybe?

2019 Nov 08 18:01:17
Johann: Kana saw that Bhikkhunis has even a rule in regard of macchariya, for Vineyya in their Vinaya.

2019 Nov 08 17:58:14
Johann: So does it dear Ven. Grandfather, so does it. Amacchariya is the domain of the Noble Ones, beginning by the stream to the complete of stinginess's root.

2019 Nov 08 17:51:33
Varado: Having eliminated the stain of stinginess together with its origin, they are beyond criticism.

2019 Nov 08 17:35:15
Johann: ...and "Vineyya maccheramalaṁ samūlaṁ aninditā"

2019 Nov 08 17:29:21
Johann: These Devas and Brahmas...  :) mudita

2019 Nov 08 16:53:41
Varado: May the Buddha bless you. May the Dhamma shine on you. May Wat Ayum be a refuge to many. For any possible help with questions, please email. My pleasure.

2019 Nov 08 13:55:57
Johann: ..."This shows that the Buddha would not be troubled by those who become angry and resentful, but by those who are strongly opinionated and who relinquish their views reluctantly...."

2019 Nov 08 09:27:01
Johann: Ven. Bhantes

2019 Nov 08 09:23:11
Khemakumara:   _/\_ _/\_ _/\_ Bhante Ariyadhammika

2019 Nov 08 06:26:12
Johann: It was four days after closing that decreased in last instance

2019 Nov 08 06:15:13
Moritz: The bot traffic is not decreasing.

2019 Nov 08 06:15:10
Johann: Ayasma Moritz

2019 Nov 08 06:14:53
Moritz: (was logged in long time before, but not at PC)

2019 Nov 08 06:14:52
Johann: Ayasama Moritz

Tipitaka Khmer

 Please feel welcome to join the transcription project of the Tipitaka translation in khmer, and share one of your favorite Sutta or more. Simply click here or visit the Forum: 

Search ATI on ZzE

Zugang zur Einsicht - Schriften aus der Theravada Tradition



Access to Insight / Zugang zur Einsicht: Dhamma-Suche auf mehr als 4000 Webseiten (deutsch / english) - ohne zu googeln, andere Ressourcen zu nehmen, weltliche Verpflichtungen einzugehen. Sie sind für den Zugang zur Einsicht herzlich eingeladen diese Möglichkeit zu nutzen. (Info)

Random Sutta
Random Article
Random Jataka

Zufälliges Sutta
Zufälliger Artikel
Zufälliges Jataka


Arbeits/Work Forum ZzE

"Dhammatalks.org":
[logo dhammatalks.org]
Random Talk
[pic 30]

Dear Visitor!

Herzlich Willkommen auf sangham.net! Welcome to sangham.net!
Ehrenwerter Gast, fühlen sie sich willkommen!

Sie können sich gerne auch unangemeldet an jeder Diskussion beteiligen und eine Antwort posten. Auch ist es Ihnen möglich, ein Post oder ein Thema an die Moderatoren zu melden, sei es nun, um ein Lob auszusprechen oder um zu tadeln. Beides ist willkommen, wenn es gut gemeint und umsichtig ist. Lesen Sie mehr dazu im Beitrag: Melden/Kommentieren von Postings für Gäste
Sie können sich aber auch jederzeit anmelden oder sich via Email einladen und anmelden lassen oder als "Visitor" einloggen, und damit stehen Ihnen noch viel mehr Möglichkeiten frei. Nutzen Sie auch die Möglichkeit einen Segen auszusprechen oder ein Räucherstäbchen anzuzünden und wir freuen uns, wenn Sie sich auch als Besucher kurz vorstellen oder Hallo sagen .
Wir wünschen viel Freude beim Nutzen und Entdecken des Forums mit all seinen nützlichen Möglichkeiten .
 
Wählen Sie Ihre bevorzugte Sprache rechts oben neben dem Suchfenster.

Wähle Sprache / Choose Language / เลือก ภาษา / ជ្រើសយកភាសា: ^ ^
 Venerated Visitor, feel heartily welcome!
You are able to participate in discussions and post even without registration. You are also able to report a post or topic to the moderators, may it be praise or a rebuke. Both is welcome if it is meant with good will and care. Read more about it within the post: Report/comment posts for guests
But you can also register any time or get invited and registered in the way to request via Email , or log in as "Visitor". If you are logged in you will have more additional possibilities. Please feel free to use the possibility to  give a blessing or light an incent stick and we are honored if you introduce yourself or say "Hello" even if you are on a short visit.
We wish you much joy in using and exploring the forum with all its useful possibilities  
Choose your preferred language on the right top corner next to the search window!

Zugang zur Einsicht - Übersetzung, Kritik und Anmerkungen

Herzlich Willkommen im Arbeitsforum von zugangzureinsicht.org im Onlinekloster sangham.net!


Danke werte(r) Besucher(in), dass Sie von dieser Möglichkeit Gebrauch machen und sich direkt einbringen wollen.

Unten (wenn Sie etwas scrollen) finden Sie eine Eingabemaske, in der Sie Ihre Eingabe einbringen können. Es stehen Ihnen auch verschiedene Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten zur Verfügung. Wenn Sie einen Text im formatierten Format abspeichern wollen, klicken Sie bitte das kleine Kästchen mit dem Pfeil.

Die Textfelder "Name" und "email" müssen ausgefüllt werden, Sie können hier aber auch eine Anonyme Angabe machen und eine Pseudo-email angeben (geben Sie, wenn Sie Rückantwort haben wollen, jedoch einen Kontakt an), wenn Ihnen das unangenehm ist. Der Name scheint im Forum als Text auf und die Email ist von niemanden außer dem Administrator einsehbar.

Wenn Sie den Text fertig geschrieben haben, müssen Sie noch den Spamschutz überwinden, das Bild zusammen setzen, und dann auf "Vorschau" oder "Senden" drücken, wenn für Sie alles passt.

Wenn Sie eine Spende einer Übersetzung machen wollen, wäre es schön, wenn Sie etwas vom Entstehen bzw. deren Herkunft erzählen und Ihrer Gabe vielleicht noch eine Widmung anhängen.

Gerne, so es möglich ist, werden wir Ihre Übersetzung dann auch den Seiten von Zugang zur Einsicht veröffentlichen. Für generelle Fragen zu dem Umfang der Dhamma-Geschenke auf ZzE sehen Sie bitte in den FAQ von ZzE ein.

Gerne empfangen wir Kritik und selbstverständlich auch Korrekturen oder Anregungen hier. Es steht Ihnen natürlich offen und Sie sind dazu herzlich eingeladen auch direkt mit einem eigenen Zugang hier an den Arbeiten vielleicht direkt teilzunehmen.

Sadhu!

metta & mudita
Ihr Zugang zur Einsicht Team

Um sich im Abeitsforum etwas unzusehen, klicken Sie hier. . Sie finden hier viele Informationen und vielleicht sogar neues rund um Zugang zur Einsicht.

Author Topic: [P] Piyadassi Thera: Das Buch der Schutzvorkehrung - The Book of Protection  (Read 20739 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
*sgift*

Es ist sicher schon ein zwei Jahre her, da hatte ich begonnen ein geschenktes Dhamma-Dana Buch abzuschreiben und zu übersetzen.

Wie mit fast allen Schätzen, denen ich dort und da als Geschenk begegnet bin finden sich alle in der aussergewöhnlichen Schätzesammlung gegeben mit Accesstoinsight.org wieder.

Ich hab dies vor ein paar Tagen Sophorn erzählt, die nach dem Verbleib des Buches gefragt hatte und das Interesse war und ist auch groß, dieses Werk in eine gute Deutsche Sprache zu bringen.

Auch kommte ich noch die begonnene Arbeit finden. Wo meine Sprachenverständnis heute noch ziemlich mies ist war es damals sicher noch mieser, dennoch dachte ich, es auch hier als Arbeitsunterlage oder Anregung zu platzieren, dass daraus vielleicht etwas besseres und gutes wird und vielleicht auch im Deutschen Raum, dort oder da neben dem Hausaltar zu liegen kommt.



The Book of Protection
Paritta

translated from the original Pali, with introductory essay and explanatory notes by
Piyadassi Thera
with a Foreword by
V.F. Gunaratna
© 1999–2011


Das Buch der Zuflucht
Paritta

Mit vorstellenden Aufsatz und erklärenden Bemerkungen übersetzt aus den original Pali von
Piyadassi Thera
mit einem Vorwort von
V.F. Gunaratna

May peace harmonious bless this land;
May it be ever free from maladies and war;
May there be harvest rich, and increased yield of grain;
May everyone delight in righteousness;
May no perverted thought find entry to your minds;
May all your thoughts e'er pious be and lead
to your success religiously.
— Tibetan Great Yogi, Milarepa


Möge Frieden dieses Land in Harmonie segnen;
Möge es für immer frei von Übel und Krieg sein;
Möge die Ernte hier stets reich sein und steigernd der Ertrag des Getreide sein;
Möge jedermann entzückt in Rechtschaffenheit sein;
Möge kein widernatürlicher Gedanke Zugang in euren Geist haben;
Mögen alle eure Gedanken stets fromm sein und euch zu spirituellen Erfolg führen.
- Milarepa, ein großer tibetischen Yogi


Most gratefully and most devotedly
dedicated to my departed parents
('Matapitaro pubbacariyati vuccare')
— Anguttara Nikaya, ii. p. 70


Mit größter Hingabe und Demut
meinen verstorbenen Eltern gewidmet.
('Matapitaro pubbacariyati vuccare')
— Anguttara Nikaya, II. 70

Contents
Inhaltsverzeichnis


Preface
Einleitung

Foreword
Vorwort

The Value of Paritta
Der Nutzen von Paritta

The Book of Protection
Das Buch der Zuflucht

Invitation
Einladung

i. Going for Refuge (Sarana-gamana)
I Zuflucht nehmen (sarana-gamana)

ii. The Ten Training Precepts (Dasa-sikkhapada)
II Die Zehn Tugendreglen (dasa-sikkhapada)

iii. Questions to be Answered by a Novice (Samanera Pañha)
III Fragen die von einem Novicen beantwortet werden (Samanera-pañha)

iv. The Thirty two Parts of the Body (Dvattimsakara)
IV.Die Zweiunddreisig Teile des Körpers (dvattimsakara)

v. The Four-fold Reflection of a Monk (Paccavekkhana)
V. Die vierfache Betrachtung eines Mönches (Paccavekkhana)

Discourses (Suttas):
Lehrreden

1. Discourse on the Ten Dhammas (Dasa-dhamma sutta)
Rede von den Zehn Dingen (Dasa-dhamma sutta)

2. Discourse on Blessings (Mangala Sutta)
2. Lehrrede über Segen (Maha-mangala Sutta)

3. The Jewel Discourse (Ratana Sutta)
3. Die Juwelen Lehrrede (Ratana Sutta)

4. Discourse on Loving-kindness (Metta Sutta)
4. Lehrrede über liebevolle Freundlichkeit (Karaniya Metta Sutta)

5. Protection of the Aggregates (Khandha Sutta)
5. Schutz der Anhäufungen (Khandha Paritta)

6. Discourse on Advantages of Loving-kindness (Mettanisamsa)
Lehrrede über Vorzüge von liebevoller Freundlichkeit (Mettanisamsa Sutta)

7. The Advantages of Friendship (Mittanisamsa)
7. Die Vorzüge von Freundschaft (Mittanisamsa)

8. The Peacock's Prayer for Protection (Mora Paritta)
8. Das Pfauengebet für Schutz (Mora Paritta)

9. The Moon Deity's Prayer for Protection (Canda Paritta)
9. Das Mondgottheitsgebet für Schutz (Canda Paritta)

10. The Sun Deity's Prayer for Protection (Suriya Paritta)
10. Das Sonnengottheitsgebet für Schutz (Suriya Paritta)

11. Banner Protection (Dhajagga Paritta)
11. Leitende Qualitäten - Schutz (Dhajagga Paritta)

12. Factors of Enlightenment (Maha Kassapa Thera Bhojjhanga)
12. Faktoren der Erleuchtung (Maha Kassapa Thera Bojjhanga)

13. Factors of Enlightenment (Maha Moggallana Thera Bhojjhanga)
13. Faktoren der Erleuchtung (Maha Moggallana Thera Bojjhanga)

14. Factors of Enlightenment (Maha Cunda Thera Bhojjhanga)
14. Faktoren der Erleuchtung (Maha Cunda Thera Bojjhanga)

15. Discourse to Girimananda Thera (Girimananda Sutta)
15. Lehrrede an Girimananda Thera (Girimananda Sutta)

16. Discourse at Isigili (Isigili Sutta)
16. Die Lehrrede am Isigili (Isigili Sutta)    

17. Setting in Motion the Wheel of Truth (Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta)
17. In Bewegung setzen des Rades der Wahrheit (Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta)

18. The Great Assembly (Maha-samaya Sutta)
18. The Great Assembly (Maha-samaya Sutta)

19. Discourse to Alavaka (Alavaka Sutta)
19. Lehrrede an Alavaka

20. Discourse to Bharadvaja, the farmer (Kasibharadvaja Sutta)
20. Lehrrede an Bharadvaja, den Bauer (Kasibharadvaja Sutta[1])

21. Discourse on Downfall (Parabhava Sutta)
21. Lehrrede über Niedergang (Parabhava Sutta[1])   

22. Discourse on Outcasts (Vasala Sutta)
22. Lehrrede über Ausgestoßene (Vasala Sutta[1])

23. Discourse on the Analysis of the Truths (Saccavibhanga Sutta)
23. Lehrrede über Die Untersuchung der Wahrheiten (Saccavibhanga Sutta[1])  

24. Discourse on Atanatiya (Atanatiya Sutta)
24. Lehrrede an Atanatiya (Atanatiya Sutta[1])  

Appendix
Anhang

Protective Discourse to Angulimala (Angulimala Paritta)
Die schützende Lehrrede an Angulimala (Angulimala Paritta)

Invitation to Deities (Devaradhana)
Einladung der Gottheiten (Devaradhana)

End Notes
Schlußanmerkungen  

Abbreviations
Abkürzungsverzeichnis

Be loving and be pitiful
And well controlled in virtue's ways,
Strenuous bent upon the goal,
And onward ever bravely press.

That danger does in dalliance lie —
That earnestness is sure and safe —
This when you see, then cultivate
The Eight-fold Path so shall ye realize,
So make your own, the Deathless Way.'
— Psalms of the Brethren, 979,980


Sei freundlich, mitfühlend
Und kontrolliert in tugendhafter Art,
Unermüdlich dem Ziel zugeneigt,
Vorwärts schreitend, stets, mit wackeren Mut.

Die Gefahr liegt in der Liebelei  –
Diese Ernsthaftigkeit ist zuverlässig und sicher –
Wenn dies du gesehen, dann kultiviere
Den Achtfachen Pfad, so soll das wahrgenommen sein.
So mache deinen eigenen Weg, zum Weg der Todlosigkeit.
Psalm der Brüder 978,980
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 08:32:56 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Einleitung
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2013, 02:54:07 PM »
Preface  

The Book of Protection which is an anthology of selected discourses of the Buddha compiled by the teachers of old, was originally meant as a handbook for the newly ordained novice. The idea was that those novices who are not capable of studying large portions of the "Discourse Collection" (sutta pitaka) should at least be conversant with the Book of Protection. Even today it is so. The twenty four discourses are selected from the five Nikayas or the original Collections in Pali containing the Buddha's discourses. The fact that the book was meant for the novice is clear from the prefatory paragraphs that precede the discourses.

The precepts are ten, and not five which are the basic principles of the lay follower. The novice is expected to observe the ten precepts. This is followed by the "Questions to be Answered by a Novice" and the "Thirty Two Parts of the Body" which is really a type of meditation on the constituent parts of one's body. Then comes the "Four-fold reflection of a Monk," and finally the "Ten Essentials (Dhammas)" to be reflected upon by one who has gone forth to live the holy life. The discourses come next. If one patiently and painstakingly studies these discourses, he could gather a good knowledge of the essentials and fundamental teachings of the Buddha.

The Maha-samaya sutta and the Atanatiya sutta ending the book may appear to some as pointless, but a careful reader will no doubt appreciate their relevance. In the essay on the Value of Paritta an attempt is made to show what paritta means to a Buddhist.
I have endeavored to keep as close as possible to the original wording of the text without making it too literal a translation on the one hand, and a word for word translation on the other, and have avoided translating the Pali stanzas into verse (except the stanzas of discourses No. 5, 11, 19) in order to give a very faithful, easy, and readable rendering. I have preserved the synonymous words and repetitions found in the suttas since they are the ipsissima verba of the Buddha handed down to us through oral tradition.

In all the suttas the word "Bhagava," the "Blessed One," an epithet of the Buddha, is frequently used. To avoid using the same word too often in the translation, I have, at times, used the word "the Buddha" for "Bhagava" or a personal pronoun to denote him.
The Pali words and names included in this work are lacking in diacritical marks. In some places however, the smaller type with such marks are used. But students of Pali may not find any difficulty in pronouncing them. The reader may refer to the Khandha-vatta Jataka (No. 203) when studying the Khandha Paritta.

The Angulimala Paritta is a short discourse that does not appear in the Book of Protection (Paritta text), but as it is a paritta made use of by expectant mothers in Buddhist lands, I have included it in the Appendix. Other Pali stanzas, used by the Buddhists when reciting the Parittas, are also included in the Appendix with their English renderings.

I am indebted beyond measure to Mr. V.F. Gunaratna, retired public trustee of Sri Lanka, for his painstaking reading of the script, his careful and valuable suggestions, and for writing the Foreword. The Ven. Kheminda Maha Thera assisted me in finding the references, the Ven. Siridhamma Thera in reading the proofs, and Mr. K.G. Abeysinghe in typing the script. I am grateful to them. To Miss K. Jayawardana of Union printing Works and her staff who took a keen interest in the printing of this work, I am thankful. Last, but far from least, my thanks are due to Messrs D. Munidase and U.P. de Zoysa for all the help they have given me.

—Piyadassi
Vesakha-mase, 2519: May 1975
Vajirarama,
Colombo 5,
Sri Lanka (Ceylon).




Einleitung

Das Buch der Zuflucht ist eine Zusammenstellung ausgesuchter Reden Buddhas, erstellt von Lehrern der alten Zeit und war ursprünglich als ein Handbuch für neu eingeweihte Novizen gedacht. Der Gedanke war, dass jene Novizen, die nicht in der Lage waren, große Teile der Redesammlung (sutta pitaka) zu lernen, zumindest mit dem Buch der Schutzvorkehrungen vertraut waren. Selbst heute ist es noch so. Die vierundzwanzig Reden sind aus den fünf Nikavas, der Originalsammlung in Pali, welche die Lehrreden Buddhas enthalten, entnommen. Das diese Buch für Novizen vorgesehen war, wird durch die einleitenden Paragraphen vor den Suttas klar.

So sind die zehn Tugendregeln und nicht die fünf, wie sie für Laienpraktizierende Grundlage sind, angeführt. Ein Novize ist angehalten die zehn Tugendregeln einzuhalten. Diese werden gefolgt von „Fragen, die von einem Novizen zu beantwortet sind“ und den „Zweiunddreißig Teilen des Körpers“, welches Grundlage für eine vertiefte Art der Meditation über die Bestandteile des Körpers ist. Dann folgt die „Vierfache Betrachtung eines Bhikkhus“ und letztlich die „Zehn essenziellen Dinge (Dhammas)“, welche von einem der fortgezogen ist, um das heilige Leben zu führen, stets zu reflektieren sind. Die Lehrreden kommen in Folge. Wenn jemand geduldig und sorgfältig diese Lehrreden studiert, würde er sich ein gutes Stück an Wissen über die grundlegenden und fundamentalen Lehren Buddhas aneignen.

Das Maha-samaya Sutta und das Atanativa Sutta, am Ende des Buches, mag für manche etwas unnütz erscheinen, jedoch würde dem aufmerksamen Leser kein Zweifel entstehen und Verständnis an der Relevanz sichtbar sein. In der Abhandlung über „Der Nutzen von Paritta“, wird versucht zu erklären, welche Bedeutung paritta für einen Buddhisten hat.

Ich habe mich bemüht so gut wie möglich die originale Bedeutung der Texte, ohne es zu wörtlich, auf der einen Seite und ohne eine Wort für Wort Übersetzung zu machen, auf der anderen Seite, wiederzugeben. Auch habe ich davon Abstand genommen die Pali Strophen (bis auf die Strophern in den Lehrreden Nr. 5,11,19) in Versen zu übersetzen, um einen sehr sinngetreuen, einfachen und leicht lesbaren Rahmen zu geben. Ich habe die Synonymworte und Wiederholungen in den Suttas erhalten, da diese ipsissima verba in der Tradition der mündlichen Überlieferung, wie Buddha sie uns übergeben hat, sind.

In allen Suttas werden die Worte “Bhagava”, der “Erhabene”, stets als Bezeichnungen für den Buddha verwendet. Um es zu vermeiden, die selben Worte zu oft zu verwenden, habe ich manchmal das Wort „Buddha“ für „Bhagava“ oder ein Personalpronomen, um ihn anzuführen, verwendet.

Die Paliwörter und Namen, die in dieser Arbeit enthalten sind, würden ohne Sonderzeichen wiedergegeben. An manchen Stellen wurde die Kleinschrift oder Kursivschrift benützt, um sie zu markieren. Schüler in Pali werden jedoch kein Problem damit haben, diese richtig auszusprechen. Der Leser möge sich an das Khandha-vatta Jataka (Nr. 203) halten, wenn er das Khandha Paritta studiert.

Das Angulimala Paritta ist eine kurze Lehrrede, die nicht im Buch der Zuflucht enthalten ist (Paritta Text), aber ein viel genütztes Paritta, für in Erwartung stehende, werdende Mütter in den buddhistischen Ländern und ich habe es in Anhang beigegeben. Auch andere Pali Strophen, die von Buddhisten in der Rezitation genutzt werden, sind im Anhang angeführt.

Ich bin unermesslich verschuldet gegenüber dem ehrwürdigen K. Gunaratana, als im Ruhestand befindliche Vertrauensperson in Sri Lanka, für sein sorgfältiges Lesen der Arbeit, seine umsichtigen und wertvollen Ratschläge und für das Vorwort zu dem Buch. Dem ehrwürdige Kheminda Maha Thera bin ich dankbar für die Hilfe die Quellen zu finden, dem ehrwürdige Siridhamma Thera, für das Korrekturlesen und Herr K.G. Abeysinghe, für die Datenverarbeitung zu diesem Buch. Ich bin weiters Frau K. Jayawardana, von „Union printing Works“, und ihren Mitarbeitern dankbar, welche reges Interesse hatten, diese Arbeit zu drucken. Zuletzt aber, und in keiner geringeren Weise, möchte ich meinen Dank an D. Munidase und U.P. de Zoya, für all ihre Hilfe, die sie mir gegeben haben, aussprechen.

—Piyadassi
Vesakha-mase, 2519: Mai 1975
Vajirarama,
Colombo 5,
Sri Lanka (Ceylon)


Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 05:06:31 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Vorwort
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2013, 05:42:47 PM »
Foreword   
by V.F. Gunaratna

The world of English Buddhist literature has been enriched by the publication of this book entitled "The Book of Protection." This is a translation by the Ven. Piyadassi Maha Thera of what is well known to every Sinhala Buddhist home as the Pirit Potha which means the book of protection. It contains a collection of suttas or discourses taken from the teaching of the Buddha and are meant to be recited in temples and homes for the purpose of obtaining protection from all harm. This is achieved by recalling with saddha or confidence the virtues of the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha referred to in these discourses. There are many who listen to the recitation of these discourses but who hardly understand the import of these discourses and therefore any benefit they may gain must be necessarily slight. This translation, therefore, supplies a long-felt need as it will help such persons to listen with understanding when pirith is being recited. The venerable translator is therefore to be congratulated as being the first to translate a book of this nature.

To translate a book is not so easy as to write a book. The work of translation calls for precision and concentrated thought. A translation that keeps too close to the original is apt to suffer from a failure to convey the spirit underlying the original text.
At the same time a translation that is too free runs the risk of expressing more than the author of the original composition had intended and thereby misrepresents him. The venerable translator has certainly done well by steering clear between these two extremes and therefore deserves special praise.
Further more, he has by the manner of his translation made it evident that he has been at pains to facilitate the purpose for which pirith is recited. By means of explanations in parenthesis and helpful foot notes he has striven to elucidate the meaning of words and phrases where their full significance appears to be obscure. If a further clarification is needed the reader is invited to refer to Ven. Piyadassi Maha Thera's book The Buddha's Ancient Path [Buddhist Publication Society, P.O. Box 61, Kandy, Sri Lanka] which deals with quite a number of points concerning the Buddha-dhamma.

There can be no doubt that this translation of the Pirith Potha by one such as the Ven. Piyadassi Maha Thera — a reputed author of several Buddhist books and a preacher whose sermons have gained great acceptance both in the East and the West — will be hailed with delight by those who desire to obtain a full understanding of the pirith that is recited in temples and homes — sometimes with marvelous effect.

Hitanukampa sambuddho-yadannamanusasati Anurodha virodhehi-vippamutto Tathagato
Love and compassion does the Enlightened feel Towards another when he instructs him The Tathagata is fully released From attachment and resentment.
— Samyutta Nikaya i. p. Iii.





Vorwort
vom ehrwürdigen.K. Gunaratna

Die Welt der buddhistischen Literatur würde durch die Publikation diese Buches, das “Buch der Zuflucht” bereichert. Dies ist eine Übersetzung vom ehrwürdigen Piyadassi Maha Thera, des in allen singhalesischen buddhistischen Haushalten bekannten unter dem Namen „Pirit Potha“ bekannt ist, welches „Buch des Schutzes“ bedeutet. Es beinhaltet eine Sammlung von Suttas, oder Lehrreden, die der Lehrredensammlung Buddhas entnommen sind, und zum rezitieren in den Tempeln und Haushalten, für das Erlangen von Schutz gegenüber allen Arten von Schaden, vorgesehen sind. Dies wird durch das vertrauensvolle (saddha) Wiedererinnern der Tugenden von Buddha, Dhamma und Sangha erreicht. Es gibt viele, die Rezitationen dieser Lehrreden hören, aber nur selten kennt man die Wichtigkeit der Inhalte dieser Diskurse, was dazu führt, dass der Nutzen daraus oft nur mager ausfällt. Diese Übersetzung stillt daher einen lang ersehnten Bedarf, da es Personen helfen wird auch zu verstehen, wenn immer ein pirith rezitiert werden sollte. Dem ehrwürdige Übersetzer ist daher zu gratulieren, da es das erste Mal ist, daß solch eine Art von Übersetzung, eines Buches dieser Natur, getan wurde.

Ein Buch zu übersetzen ist nicht so leicht, wie eines zu schreiben. Die Umsetzung einer Übersetzung erfordert Präzision und Konzentration. Eine Übersetzung die zu nahe am Original liegt, leidet daran, den Geist der im original Text liegt nicht transportieren zu können.

In gleicher Weise fehlinterpretiert eine Übersetzung, die zu frei ist, leicht den Autor, indem sie das Risiko mit sich bringt, mehr als die originale Motivation der Komposition darzustellen. Der ehrwürdige Übersetzer hat dies durch das ausgezeichnete Steuern, zwischen den beiden Extremen, einwandfrei gemeistert und bedarf hierfür eines besonderen Lobes.

Weiters hat er durch die Art und Weise der Übersetzung, mit seinen Mühen, möglich gemacht, den Sinn des Rezitierens von pirith zu transportieren. Durch das Einschieben von Zwischenbemerkungen und Fußnoten war er bemüht, die Bedeutung von eventuell unklar erscheinenden Wörtern und Phrasen, in ihrer vollen Aussagekraft auszudrücken. Wenn eine weitere Aufklärung benötigt wird, ist der Leser eingeladen sich an das Buch „The Buddha’s Anicent Path“ vom ehrwürdigen Piyadassi Maha Thera zu halten, welches eine große Anzahl an Themen, die das Buddha-Dhamma betreffen, behandelt.

Es besteht kein Zweifel, daß eine Übersetzung des Pirith Potha, wie diese hier vom ehrwürdigen Piyadassi Maha Thera, einem angesehener Autor zahlreicher buddhistischen Bücher und Lehrer, dessen Veranstaltungen große Anerkennung im Westen wie auch Osten erreicht haben, erfreut und gepriesen von jenen angenommen wird, die ein Verlangen verspüren, die in Tempeln und Häusern rezitierten pirith, mit allen ihren manchmal wunderbaren Wirkungen, gänzlich zu verstehen.

Hitanukampa sambuddho-yadannamanusasati Anurodha virodhehi-vippamutto Tathagato
Liebe und Mitgefühl fühlt der Erleuchtete
Gegenüber dem anderen, wenn er ihn unterweist:
Der Tathagata ist vollkommen befreit,
Von Anhaftungen und Abneigungen.
— Samyutta Nikaya I. p. III.

Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 05:30:28 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Der Nutzen von Paritta
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2013, 05:48:30 PM »
The Value of Paritta   

'Recent research in medicine, in experimental psychology and what is still called parapsychology has thrown some light on the nature of mind and its position in the world. During the last forty years the conviction has steadily grown among medical men that very many causes of diseases organic as well as functional, are directly caused by mental states. The body becomes ill because the mind controlling it either secretly wants to make it ill, or else because it is in such a state of agitation that it cannot prevent the body from sickening. Whatever its physical nature, resistance to disease is unquestionably correlated with the physiological condition of the patient.'[1]

'Mind not only makes sick, it also cures. An optimistic patient has more chance of getting well than a patient who is worried and unhappy. The recorded instances of faith healing includes cases in which even organic diseases were cured almost instantaneously.'[2]

In this connection it is interesting to observe the prevalence, in Buddhist lands, of listening to the recital of the dhamma or the doctrine of the Buddha in order to avert illness or danger, to ward off the influence of malignant beings, to obtain protection and deliverance from evil, and to promote health, prosperity, welfare, and well-being. The selected discourses for recital are known as "paritta suttas," discourses for protection. But they are not "rakshana mantras" or protective incantations found in Brahmanic religion, nor are they magical rites. There is nothing mystical in them.

"Paritta" in Pali, "paritrana" in Sanskrit and "pirit" (pronounced pirith) in Sinhala[3] mean principally protection. Paritta suttas describe certain suttas or discourses delivered by the Buddha and regarded as affording protection. This protection is to be obtained by reciting or listening to the paritta suttas. The practice of reciting or listening to the paritta suttas began very early in the history of Buddhism. The word paritta, in this context, was used by the Buddha, for the first time, in a discourse known as Khandha Paritta [4] in the Culla Vagga of the Vinaya Pitaka (vol. ii, p. 109), and also in the Anguttara Nikaya under the title "Ahi (metta) Sutta" (vol. ii, p. 82). This discourse was recommended by the Buddha as guard or protection for the use of the members of the Order. The Buddha in this discourse exhorts the monks to cultivate metta or loving-kindness towards all beings.
It is certain that paritta recital produces mental well-being in those who listen to them with intelligence, and have confidence in the truth of the Buddha's words. Such mental well being can help those who are ill to recover, and can also help not only to induce the mental attitude that brings happiness but also to overcome its opposite. Originally, in India, those who listened to paritta sayings of the Buddha understood what was recited and the effect on them was correspondingly great. The Buddha himself had paritta recited to him, and he also requested others to recite paritta for his own disciples when they were ill. [5] This practice is still in vogue in Buddhist lands.

The Buddha and the arahants (the Consummate Ones) can concentrate on the paritta suttas without the aid of another. However, when they are ill, it is easier for them to listen to what others recite, and thus focus their minds on the dhamma that the suttas contain, rather than think of the dhamma by themselves. There are occasions, as in the case of illness, which weaken the mind (in the case of worldlings), when hetero-suggestion has been found to be more effective than autosuggestion.

According to the teachings of the Buddha the mind is so closely linked with the body that mental states affect the body's health and well being. Some doctors even say there is no such thing as purely physical disease. That even so grossly "physical" a complaint as dental caries may be due to mental causes was maintained in a paper read before the American Dental Congress in 1937. The author pointed out that children living on a perfectly satisfactory diet may still suffer dental decay. In such cases, investigation generally shows that the child's life at home or at school is in some way unsatisfactory.

The teeth decay because their owner is under mental strain.'[6] Unless, according to the Buddhist doctrine of kamma (Sanskrit karma), [7] these bad mental states are caused as a result of one's own acts (akusala kamma-vipaka), and are therefore unalterable, it is possible so to change these mental states as to cause mental health and physical well-being to follow thereafter.

1. The Power of Truth

Several factors combine to contribute towards the efficacy of paritta recitals. Paritta recital is a form of saccakiriya, i.e., an asseveration of truth. Protection results by the power of such asseveration. This means establishing oneself in the power of truth to gain one's end. At the end of the recital of each sutta, the reciters bless the listeners with the words, etena sacca vajjena sotti te hotu sabbada which means "by the power of the truth of these words may you ever be well." The saying, "the power of the dhamma or Truth protects the follower of the dhamma" (dhammo have rakkhati dhammcarin) indicates the principle behind these sutta recitals.
"The belief in the effective power to heal, or protect, of the saccakiriya, or asseveration of something quite true, is but another aspect of the work ascribed to the paritta."[8]

2. The Power of Virtue

Several discourses of the Book of Protection describe the virtuous life. The starting point in Buddhism is sila (virtue). Standing on the firm ground of sila one should endeavor to achieve a collected mind. If it is true that virtue protects the virtuous, then a person who listens to the recital of paritta suttas intelligently, in a reflective mood, with complete confidence in the Buddha's words, uttered by one who has gained complete Enlightenment, will acquire so virtuous a state of mind as would enable him to dominate any evil influence, and to be protected from all harm.

3. The Power of Love

The utterances of the compassionate Buddha are never void of love. He walked the high-ways and by-ways of India enfolding all within the aura of his love and compassion, instructing, enlightening, and gladdening the many by his teaching. The reciters of the paritta are therefore expected to do so with a heart of love and compassion wishing the listeners and others weal and happiness and protection from all harm.
Love (metta) is an active force. Every act of one who truly loves is done with the pure mind to help, to cheer and to make the paths of others more easy, more smooth and more adapted to the conquest of sorrow, the winning of the Highest Bliss.
C. A. F. Rhys Davids commenting on amity (metta) writes: "The profession of amity, according to Buddhist doctrine, was no mere matter of pretty speech. It was to accompany and express a psychic suffusion of the hostile man or beast or spirit with benign, fraternal emotion — with metta. For strong was the conviction, from Sutta and Vinaya, to Buddhaghosa's Visuddhi Magga,[9] that "thoughts are things," that psychical action, emotional or intellectual, is capable of working like a force among forces. Europe may yet come round further to this Indian attitude."[10]

4. The Power of Sound

It is believed that the vibratory sounds produced by the sonorous and mellifluous recital of the paritta suttas in their Pali verses are soothing to the nerves and induce peace and calm of mind; they also bring about harmony to the physical system.

How can bad influences springing from evil beings be counteracted by recital of paritta suttas? Bad influences are the results of evil thinking. They can, therefore, be counteracted by wholesome states of mind. One sure way of inducing a wholesome state of mind is by listening and reflecting on paritta recitals with intelligence and confidence. So great is the power of concentration that by adverting whole-heartedly to the truth contained in the paritta recitals one is able to develop a wholesome state of mind.
The recital of paritta suttas can also bring material blessings in its wake through the wholesome states of mind induced by concentration and confidence in listening intelligently to the recital. According to the Buddha, right effort is a necessary factor in overcoming suffering.[11] Listening to these recitals in the proper way can also generate energy for the purpose of securing worldly progress while it also secures spiritual progress.

There is no better medicine than truth (Dhamma) for the mental and physical ills which are the causes of all suffering and misfortune. So the recital of paritta suttas in as much as they contain the dhamma, may, when they are listened to in the proper attitude, bring into being wholesome states of mind which conduce to health, material progress and spiritual progress. The effect of Pirit can also transcend distance however great.

It is true that the Buddhists consider the parittas as a never-failing, potent, and purifying force, a super-solvent. However, a question may arise whether recitals from the Book of Protection will, in every case, result in the protection and blessing sought for. In this connection the same reply given by the Venerable Nagasena to King Milinda's question why the recital of paritta does not in all cases protect one from death, is worth remembering: "Due to three causes recital of paritta may have no effect: kamma hindrances (kammavarana); hindrances from defilements (kilesavarana); lack of faith (asaddhanataya)." [12]

Kamma means action and not the result of action; therefore action can be counteracted by other action. Kamma is not something static, but is always changing, i.e., always in the making; that being so, action can be counteracted by other action. Hence bad actions on the part of the hearers of the recital may negative the beneficial effects of the recital.

If the mind of the hearer is contaminated with impure thoughts then also the intended beneficial effects of the recital may not materialize. But however impure the mind of the hearer may be if there is great confidence in the efficacy of the recital then this important factor may help to secure for him the beneficial effects of the recital.

Notes

1. For the physical basis of resistance, see The Nature of Disease by J. E. R. McDonagh, F.R.C.S.
2. Aldous Huxley. Ends and Means (London, 1946), p. 259.
3. The state language of Sri Lanka (Ceylon).
4. See below, discourse no. 5.
5. See below Bojjhanga and Girimananda suttas, numbers 12, 13, 14 and 15.
6. Aldous Huxley, Ends and Means, London 1946, p. 259.
7. Karma in Buddhism means action brought about by volition.
8. C. A. F. Rhys Davids, Dialogues of the Buddha, part 3, p. 186.
9. Chapter ix. p. 313. According to the Sasamalankara quoted in Gray's Buddhaghosuppatti, p.15, Buddhaghosa was about to write a Commentary on the Paritta, when he was sent to greater work in Ceylon.
10. Dialogues of the Buddha, part 3, p. 185.
11. S. i. 214.
12. Milinda Pañha, vol. I., p. 216.






Der Nutzen von Paritta

‘Die letzten medizinischen Studien in experimenteller Psychologie und jenem, dass man immer noch Parapsychologie nennt, haben etwas Licht auf die Natur des Geistes und seiner Position in der Welt geworfen. In den letzten vierzig Jahren ist die Überzeugung, dass viele organische wie auch funktionale Krankheiten direkt im Zusammenhang mit dem mentalen Zustand liegen, unter den Medizinern stets angewachsen. Der Körper wird krank, weil der Geist ihn, in versteckter Weise, krank haben möchte. In anderen Fällen, halten gewisse Zustände der Unruhe den Körper ab, sich gegen Krankheiten zu schützen. Was immer die physische Natur sein mag, Resistenz ist unwiderlegbar zusammenhängend mit dem physiologischen Zustand des Patienten.‘

‚Der Geist macht nicht nur krank, er heilt auch. Ein optimistischer Patient hat mehr Chancen auf Genesung als einer, der sich sorgt und missgestimmt ist. Die aufgezeichneten Beispiele, betreffend Heilungen auf Vertrauensbasis, haben gezeigt, dass selbst organische Krankheiten nahezu unverzüglich heilbar sind.‘

In diesem Zusammenhang ist es nun interessant die Verbreitung des Zuhörens an Rezitationen des Dhammas oder den Lehrreden Buddhas, in buddhistischen Ländern, in der Absicht Krankheiten und Gefahren zu vermeiden, vor dem Einfluß von böswilligen Wesen abzuwehren, Schutz und Erlösung vom Bösen zu erlangen und Gesundheit, Reichtum und Wohlergehen zu mehren, zu betrachten. Die ausgewählten Lehrreden, die der Rezitation dienen sind als „paritta suttas“, Lehrreden für den Schutz, bekannt. Aber sie sind keine "rakshana mantras," oder beschützende Beschwörungsformeln, wie sie im Brahmanismus begründet sind, noch irgend eine Art von Zauber. Da ist überhaupt nichts mystisches in ihnen.

“Paritta” in Pali, “paritrana” in Sanskit und “pirit” in Singhalesisch, bedeutet vornehmlich Schutz. Paritta Suttas geben diverse Suttas oder Lehrreden, die von Buddha als Schutzmittel dargeboten wurden, wieder. Die Praxis des Rezitierens und das Zuhören von paritta suttas, begann in den frühen Jahren der buddhistischen Geschichte. Das Wort paritta, in diesem Kontext, wurde von Buddha zum ersten mal in der Lehrrede, die als Khandha Paritta im Culla Vagga des Vinaya Pitaka (II, 109) bekannt ist und auch in Anguttara Nikaya unter dem Titel „Ahi (metta) Sutta“ (II, 82) erwähnt. Diese Lehrrede wurde von Buddha, als Leiter oder Beschützer zum Gebrauch für seiner Ordensmitglieder empfohlen. Der Buddha hielt in dieser Lehrrede seine Mönche dazu an, metta oder liebevolle Güte gegenüber allen Lebenwesen zu kultivieren.

Es ist gewiss, dass das Rezitieren von paritta, mentales Wohlbefinden für jene, die diesem mit Einsicht zuhören und Vertrauen in die Wahrheit Buddhas Worte haben, hervorruft. So ein mentales Wohlbefinden kann Kranken helfen zu genesen und mag nicht nur dazu dienen mentale Freude zu bringen sondern auch das Gegenteil zu überwinden. Ursprünglich, in Indien, war es so, dass die Zuhörenden die Aussagen Buddhas, die rezitiert wurden, verstanden hatten und die Wirkung daraus war naturgemäß groß. Buddha hat parita auch für sich selbst rezitiert und hielt auch seine Schüler an dies zu tun, wenn sie krank sind. Diese Praxis ist in buddhistischen Ländern nach wie vor beliebt.

Buddha und Arahants (die Vollendeten) können sich auf paritta sutta konzentrieren, ohne jeder Hilfe von anderen. Wie immer, wenn diese krank sind, ist es für sie leicht zuzuhören was andere rezitieren und ihren Geist auf das Dhamma, das dieses Sutta enthält, und nicht auf das Dhamma das zu hören ist, zu richten. Da waren Anlässe von Krankheitsfällen, die den Geist (in diesem Fall Weltlinge) geschwächt hatten, wo gewöhnliche Ratschläge als effektiver befunden sein mögen, als Autosuggestion.

Entsprechend den Lehren Buddhas ist der Geist stark mit dem Körper verbunden und mentale Zustände beeinflussen die Gesundheit des Körpers und das Wohlbefinden. Manche Ärzte sagen sogar, dass es so etwas wie eine rein physische Krankheit nicht gibt. Selbst so grobe „physische“ Beschwerden wie Zahnkaries mögen auf mentale Ursachen zurückgehen, wie dies in einer Aussendung des „American Dental Congress“ 1937 geschrieben war. Zu diesem Fall zeigen Untersuchungen, dass das Leben betroffener Kinder zu Hause oder in der Schule meist unbefriedigend ist. Die Zähne faulen, weil deren Besitzer unter mentaler Anspannung ist. Davon abgesehen ( entsprechend der buddhistischen Lehre über kamma (Sanskrit karma), sind die schlechten mentalen Zustände Resultate des eigenen Handelns (akusala-kamma-vipaka) und daher unumgänglich) ist es möglich diese mentalen Zustände und mentale Gesundheit zu erwirken und damit in Folge physisches Wohlbefinden zu verursachen.

1. Die Macht der Wahrheit

Mehrere Faktoren tragen zur Effektivität des paritta Rezitierens bei. Paritta Rezitation ist eine Form von saccakiriya, in anderen Worten, eine Beteuerung der Wahrheit. Schutz resultiert aus solchen Beteuerungen. Das bedeutet in sich selbst die Kraft der Wahrheit aufzubauen, um sein Ziel zu erreichen. Am Ende der Rezitation jedes Suttas, segnet der Rezitierende die Zuhörer mit den Worten "etena sacca vajjena sotti te hotu sabbada" welches „mit der Macht der Wahrheit dieser Worte, mögest du stets Wohlauf sein“ bedeutet. Der Satz „Die Macht des Dhamma oder Wahrheit beschützt die Getreuen des Dhammas“ (dhammo have rakkhati dhammcarin) bezeugt das Prinzip dahinter, am Ende dieser Sutta-Rezitationen.

2. Die Macht der Tugend

Zahlreiche Lehrreden in dem Buch der Schutzvorkehrungen beschreiben das tugendhafte Leben. Der Ausgangspunkt im Buddhismus ist Sila (Tugend). Auf einem soliden Grund von sila zu stehen, sollte man bestreben, um einen gesammelten Geist zu bekommen. Wenn es wahr ist, dass Tugend die Tugendhaften beschützt, dann würde eine Person, die der Rezitation eines parittas, in reflektierender Weise, mit völligem Vertrauen im Buddhas Worte, hört, einen tugendhaften Zustand des Geistes erlangen, der es Ihr ermöglicht, jede Art von schlechtem Einfluß zu beherrschen und geschützt vor allen Verletzungen sein.

3. Die Macht der Liebe

Die Äußerungen des mitfühlenden Buddhas sind niemals ohne Liebe. Er wanderte entlang der Hauptstraßen und Seitenwege Indiens und hüllte mit seiner Ausstrahlung aus Liebe und Mitgefühl, Lehren, erleuchtenden Erklärungen, alle ein und erfreute sie durch seine Belehrungen. Für das Rezitieren der paritta ist es daher erforderlich, dies mit einem Herzen voller Liebe und Mitgefüh und dem Zuhörer und anderen Wohlsein, Freude und Schutz vor jedem Unglück wünschend, zu tun.

Liebe (metta) ist eine treibende Kraft. Jeder Akt der aus reiner Liebe und mit reinem Geist helfen zu wollen, jubelnd den Pfad für andere leichter, glatter zu gestalten und mehr dazu neigt Sorgen zu vermeiden, ist von höchstem Segen.

C.A.F. Rhys Davids schreibt zu Freundlichkeit (metta) folgendes: „Die Kunst der Freundlichkeit, entsprechend der buddhistischen Lehre, war nicht bloß eine Frage der netten Sprache. Es musste mit einer Art psychologischen Überzug über einen feindseligen Menschen, ein Biest oder einen Geist, einher gehen, mit metta. Stark war die Überzeugung, von Sutta und Vinyay bis Buddhaghosas Visuddhi Magga, das „Gedanken Dinge sind“, das psychische Handlungen, emotional oder intellektuell, im Stande sind, wie eine Kraft unter Kräften zu wirken.“

4. Die Macht der Klänge

Man glaubt daran, dass der vibrierende Klang, der durch das volltönende und liebliche Rezitieren der paritta sutta in ihren Pali Versen, die Nerven beruhigen und Friede und Stille im Geist bringen, sie schaffen auch Harmonie im physikalischen System.

Wie kann das Rezitieren von paritta sutta schlechtem Einfluß, der aus Bösem entspringt, entgegenwirken? Schlechte Einwirkungen sind das Resultat von unheilsamen Denken. Diesen kann man daher, durch eine heilsame geistige Haltung, entgegenwirken. Ein sicherer Weg um eine heilsame Haltung des Geistes zu erwirken, ist der praitta Rezitation achtsam und mit Vertrauen zu folgen und zu reflektieren. Die Macht der Konzentration, die sich mit ganzem Herzen der Wahrheit in den paritta Rezitation annimmt, ist so groß, das man im Stande ist heilsame Geisteshaltung zu entwickeln.

Die Rezitation von paritta sutta kann durch den Sog der durch eine heilsame Geisteshaltung, die durch Konzentration und Vertrauen entsteht, auch materiellen Segen durch das intellektuellen Hören bringen. Entsprechend Buddha ist die richtige Anstrengung notwendig um Leiden zu überwinden. Diese Suttas in der passenden Weise zu hören, kann Energie zum Zwecke weltlicher Absicherungen generieren, aber auch den spirituellen Weg sichern.

Es gibt keine bessere Medizin als Wahrheit (Dhamma) für mentale und physische Krankheiten, die stets Grund für Leiden und Unglück sind. Die Rezitation von paritta sutta, was immer da an dhamma auch enthalten sein mag, bringt, wenn es mit der richtigen Einstellung gehört wird, heilsame Geisteshaltungen auf, welche Gesundheit im materiellen und spirituellem Fortschritt nach sich ziehen. Der Effekt von Pirit kann auch Distanzen, wie groß auch immer sie sein mögen, überwinden.

Es ist in der Tat so, daß Buddhisten parittas als niemals verfehlende Kraft und reinigende Macht, ein Speziallösungsmittel, ansehen. Wie immer mag die Frage auf kommen, ob durch das Rezitieren aus dem Buch der Schutzvorkehrungen, in jedem Fall der begehrte Schutz und Segen erlangt werden wird. In diesem Zusammenhang ist es von Wert, sich an die Antwort des Ehrwürdigen Nagasena, an des Königs Milindas Frage, ob das Rezitieren von parittas einem vor dem Tod beschützen kann, zu erinnern: „Infolge von drei Gründen mag das Rezitieren von paritta keinen Effekt haben: karmische Hindernisse (kammavarana); Hindernisse durch Verunreinigungen (kilesavarana); Abwesenheit von Vertrauen (asaddhanataya).

Kamma bedeutet Handlung und nicht das Resultat von Handlungen, daher kann kamma mit anderen Handlungen entgegengewirkt werden. Kamma ist nichts statisches sondern etwas was stets in Bewegung ist, mit anderen Worten, immer im Geschehen, und es diesem daher stets entgegen gesteuert werden. Daher können negative Handlungen des Hörers der Rezitation, die Früchte aus der Rezitation beeinträchtigen.

Wenn der Geist des Hörers mit unreinen Gedanken kontaminiert ist, können auch erhoffte positive Effekte, durch die Rezitation, nicht wahr werden. Aber wie unrein der Geist des Zuhörers auch sein mag, kann großes Vertrauen in die Wirksamkeit der Rezitation dieses helfend wirken, um sicher zu gehen, daß die Rezitation dennoch seine positiven Effekte hat.

Fußnoten:
1. Für die  physikalischen Grunde der Residenz, siehe “The Nature of Disease“ von J. E. R. McDonagh, F.R.C.S.
2. Aldous Huxley. “Ends and Means” (London, 1946), Seite. 259.
3. Die Landessprache Sri Lankas (Ceylon).
4. Siehe unten, Lehrrede Nr. 55.
Siehe unten Bojjhanga und Girimananda suttas, Nummer 12, 13, 14 und 15.
6. Aldous Huxley, “Ends and Means”, London 1946, S. 259.
7. Karma in Buddhismus bedeutet Handlung, die durch eine Absicht erfolgt.
8. C. A. F. Rhys Davids, “Dialogues of the Buddha”, Teil 3, S. 186.
9. Kapitel IX. S. 313. Entsprechend dem Sasamalankara, angemerkt in Gray's Buddhaghosuppatti, S.15,  war Buddhaghosa dabei einen Kommentar zu paritta zu schreiben, als er für große Arbeit nach Ceylon geschickt wurde.
10. “Dialogues of the Buddha”, Teil 3, S. 185.
11. S. I. 214.
12. Milinda Pañha, Vol. I., S. 216.


Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 07:44:34 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Das Buch der Schutzvorkehrungen
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2013, 06:02:52 PM »
The Book of Protection  

This collection of paritta discourses — in Sinhala, The Pirit Potha — is the most widely known Pali book in Sri Lanka. It is called The Buddhist Bible; it is given an important place in the Buddhist home, and is even treated with veneration. In most houses where there is a small shrine, this book is kept there so that the inmates may refer to it during their devotional hour. Some have committed to memory the three well known discourses — Mangala, Ratana and Karaniya-metta suttas. [1] Even children are familiar with these discourses; for they learn them from their parents and elders or from the "dhamma school."

The habit of listening to the recital of paritta suttas among the Westerners is growing slowly but steadily. The present writer, while on his missions in the European and American countries, has, at request of several residents there, tape-recorded the recital of paritta suttas for their benefit, and has air-mailed cassettes containing the sutta recitals to those who sent him such cassettes.

Now what does this book contain? It is a collection of twenty four suttas or discourses almost all delivered by the Buddha, and found scattered in the five original collections (nikayas) in Pali, which form the Sutta Pitaka, the "Canonical Discourses." These discourses are preceded by an enunciation of the Three Refuges; the Ten Precepts and the questions asked of a novice.

This collection of discourses, popularly known as Pirit Potha or The Book of Protection, has a less known title, Catubhanavara (in Sinhala Satara Banavara). A 13th century Commentary to this, written in Pali, by a pupil of the Venerable Rajaguru Vanaratana of Sri Lanka, is available under the title Catubhanavara Atthakatha or Sarattha Samuccaya.
What is a bhanavara? It is a collection of sermons or discourses. Four such collections are called Catubhanavara. As the teachers of old have said, a three-word line (pada) is made up of eight syllables (attha akkhara), four such padas make a stanza or a gatha. Thus stanzas consists of thirty-two syllables. 250 such stanzas is called a bhanavara which consists of 8,000 syllables. The Catunabhanavara was compiled by the Maha Theras, the teachers of yore (paranakacariya), of Sri Lanka, and today it is known among the Buddhists of Sri Lanka as the Pirit Potha The Book of Protection.

It is customary for Buddhist monks, when they are invited to the homes of the laity on occasions of domestic importance, such as birth days, house-warming, illness, and similar events, to recite the three popular discourses mentioned above. In the domestic and social life of the people of Sri Lanka pirit ceremony is of great significance. No festival or function, religious or social, is complete without the recital of the paritta. On special occasions monks are invited to recite the paritta suttas not for short periods but right through the night or for three or seven days, and at times, for weeks. On such occasions a pavilion (pirit mandapaya) is constructed for the purpose of accommodating the monks at the recital. Before the commencement of the recital the laity present at the ceremony makes a formal invitation to the monks by reciting in Pali three stanzas which explain the purpose of the recital.[2] Then the monks, generally about twelve or fourteen, who have been invited, will recite the three popular suttas. Thereafter a pair of monks will commence reciting the remaining suttas for two hours. They will then retire and will be followed by another pair for another two hours. Two monks must be constantly officiating. In this manner the recital will last till dawn.

While the recital continues there will be found a pot of water placed on a table before the monks. On this table there is also a sacred thread (pirit nula). For an all night pirit ceremony the casket containing a relic of the Buddha, and the Pirit Potha or The Book of Protection written on ola leaves, are also brought into the pavilion. The relic represents the Buddha, the "Pirit Potha" represents the Dhamma or the teachings of the Buddha, and the reciting Bhikkhu-Sangha represent the Ariya-Sangha, the arahant disciples of the Buddha.

The thread is drawn round the interior of the pavilion, and its end twisted round the casket, the neck of the pot of water, and tied to the cord of the ola-leaf book. While the special discourses are being recited the monks hold the thread. The purpose is to maintain an unbroken communication from the water to the relic, to the Pirit Potha and to the officiating monks, (Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, the Ti-ratana, the three jewels.) A ball of thread connected to "The Three Jewels" and the water, is unloosened and passed on to the listeners (seated on the ground on mats), who hold the thread while the recital goes on.

When the recital in Pali of the entire book is over at dawn, the thread sanctified by the recital is divided into pieces and distributed among the devotees to be tied round their wrists or necks. At the same time the sanctified water is sprinkled on all, who even drink a little of it and sprinkle it on their heads. These are to be regarded as symbols of the protective power of the paritta that was recited. It is a service of inducing blessings. It has its psychological effects.

Dr. Bernard Grad of McGill University in Montreal painstakingly proved that if a psychic healer held water in a flask and this water was later poured on barley seeds, the plants significantly outgrew untreated seeds. But — and this is the intriguing part — if depressed psychiatric patients held the flasks of water, the growth of seeds was retarded.
'Dr. Grad suggests, that there appeared to be some "x factor" or energy that flows from the human body to affect growth of plants and animals. A person's mood affected this energy. This previously unacknowledged "energy" has the widest implications for medical science, from healing to lab tests, Grad says.'[3]

As experimentally discovered by Dr. Grad mind can influence matter. If that be so, not much thinking is necessary to draw the logical inference that mind can influence mind. Further if the human mind can influence lower animals, then by a parity of reasoning the human mind can influence the minds of beings higher than animals.

Notes
1. See below nos. 2, 3, 4.
2. See Invitation (aradhana) below.
3. Psychic Dicoveries Behind the Iron Curtain, Sheila Ostrander & Lynn Schroeder, Bantam Books, U.S.A., p. 224; also read chapter on "Healing with Thought," p. 293.




Das Buch der Schutzvorkehrung

Die Sammlung von paritta Lehrreden – in Sinhalesisch, Pirit Potha – ist das bekannteste Buch in Sri Lanka. Es wird die “buddhistische Bibel” genannt und nimmt einen wichtigen Platz in den buddhistischen Haushalten ein, selbst das Buch wird mit Ehrwürde behandelt. In den meisten Häusern gibt es einen kleinen Altar und das Buch wird sehr oft an dieser Stelle aufbewahrt, um den Bewohnern die Möglichkeit zu geben, sich auf das Buch, während ihrer Andachten, zu beziehen. Manche nehmen sich auch der Aufgabe an, sich die drei bekanntesten Lehrreden merken zu lernen: Mangala, Ratana und Karaniya metta sutta. Selbst Kindern sind diese Lehrreden bekannt und sie lernen diese von ihren Eltern, den Älteren oder in den „Dhamma Schulen“.

Die Gewohnheit paritta sutta Rezitationen zu hören wächst im Westen nur langsam, aber dennoch stetig. Der Autor hier, wurde während seiner Reisen nach Europa und Amerika von zahlreichen Leuten dort gebeten, die Rezitation von paritta suttas für deren positiven Nutzen aufzunehmen und hat diese Aufnahmen, die diese Rezitationen enthalten per, Luftpost an alle die ihm Aufnahmekassetten geschickt hatten, gesendet.

Nun was enthält dieses Buch? Es ist eine Sammlung von vierundzwanzig Suttas oder Lehrreden, nahe zu alle überliefert von Buddhas Reden, und finden sich in den fünf original Sammlungen (nikayas) in Pali, welche das Sutta Pitaka, die „Kanonische Lehrrede“ bilden, wieder. Diesen Lehrreden geht die Kundgebung zu den Drei Zufluchten, die zehn Tugendregeln und die Fragen an einen Novizen voran.

Diese Sammlung von Lehrreden, bekannt als Pirit Potha oder Schutzbuch hat auch einen weniger bekannten Titel: Catubhanavara (in Sinhalesisch Satara Banavara). Ein Kommentar aus dem 13. Jahrhundert, von einem Schüler des ehrwürdigen Rajaguru Vanaratana von Sri Lanka in Pali geschrieben, ist unter dem Titel Catubhanavara Atthakatha oder Sarattha Samuccaya erhältlich.

Was ist ein bhanavara? Es ist eine Sammlung von Zeremonien und Lehrreden. Vier solcher Sammlungen werden Catubhanavara genannt. So wie es die alten Lehrer erzählen, ist eine Dreiwörterzeile (pada) aus acht Silben gemacht, vier solcher padas werden zu einer Strophe oder einem gatha. Diese Strophen bestehen aus zweiunddreißig Silben. 250 solcher Stanzes werden ein bhanavara genannt, welches aus 8.000 Silben besteht. Das Catunabhanavara wurde von den Maha Theras , den Lehrern von einst (paranakacariya), in Sri Lanka erstellt und ist heute als Pirit Potha, das Buch der Schutzvorkehrungen, unter den Buddhisten in Sri Lanka bekannt.

Für buddhistische Mönche ist es üblich, wenn sie zu diversen häuslichen Anlässen, wie Geburt, Hauseinweihung, Krankheit oder ähnlichen, in ein Haus eingeladen werden, diese drei angeführten bekannten Lehrreden zu rezitieren. Im häuslichen und sozialen Leben der Menschen in Sri Lanka ist die pirit Zeremonie von großer Bedeutung. Keine Festivität oder Veranstaltung, religiös oder sozial ist völlig ohne das Rezitieren von parittas. Zu speziellen Anlässen werden Mönche eingeladen die paritta suttas nicht nur für eine kurze Zeit, sondern über Nacht, für drei Tage, sieben Tage oder sogar eine Woche zu rezitieren. Zu so einem Anlaß wird ein Pavillon (pirit mandapaya) errichtet, um den Mönchen hierfür den passenden Ort zu gestalten. Vor dem Beginn der Rezitation wird, von bei der Zeremonie anwesenden Laien, eine formale Einladung von drei Strophen in Pali, die den Grund der Rezitation angeben, rezitiert. Danach rezitieren die eingeladenen Mönche, meist zwölf oder vierzehn an der Zahl, die populären drei Stuttas. Hierauf beginnt eine Paar von Mönchen die übrigen Suttas für zwei Stunden zu rezitieren. Darauf folgend, weichen diese zurück und eine andere Gruppe würde diesem die nächsten zwei Stunden folgen. Zwei Mönche müssen durchwegs präsent sein. In dieser Weise dauert die Rezitation bis zum Abenddämmerung.

Während die Rezitation vorangeht, wird ein Gefäß mit Wasser auf einem Tisch vor den Mönchen platziert. Auf diesem Tisch ist auch ein heiliger Faden (pirit nula). Für eine ganztägige pirit Zeremonie wird auch eine Schatulle mit Relikten des Buddha und das Pirit Potha oder Schutzbuch, dass auf Palmenblättern geschrieben ist, in das Pavillon gebracht. Die Relikte repräsentieren den Buddha, das „Pirit Potha“ das Dhamma, oder die Lehre Buddhas, und die rezitierende Bhikkhu-Sangha repräsentiert die Ariya-Sangha, die Arahant Schüler des Buddhas.

Der Faden wird um das Interieur des Pavillons gewickelt und seine Enden an die Schatulle, den Rand des Wasserbehälters und an das Band des Palmenblattbuches gebunden. Während die wertvollen Lehrreden rezitiert werden, halten die Mönche an dem Faden fest. Der Zweck ist eine ungebrochene Verbindung zwischen dem Wasser, den Relikten, dem Pirit Potha und den vortragenden Mönchen herzustellen (Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, die Ti-ratana, die Drei Juwelen). Ein Knäul des Fadens, der mit den Drei Juwelen und dem Wasser verbunden ist, wird gelöst, den Zuhörern (die am Boden auf Matten sitzen) gereicht und von ihnen ebenfalls während der ganzen Rezitation gehalten.

Wenn die Pali Rezitation des gegenständigen Buches mit Sonnenuntergang zu Ende sind, wird der gesegnete Faden von den Rezitierenden in Stücke geschnitten und an die Anhänger verteilt, welche diese um Handgelenke und um den Hals binden. Zur selben Zeit wird das heilige Wasser über alles gesprenkelt, manche trinken etwas und sprenkeln es über ihre Köpfe. Dieses sind symbolische Rituale der schützenden Kraft aus den rezitierten parittas. Dieses Akt ist in Segengabe enthalten und hat seine psychologischen Effekte.

Dr. Bernard Grad der McGill Univerität in Montreal hat genaue Untersuchungen angestellt, in dem er während der Psychotherapien Patienten Wasser in Behältern halten ließ und dieses später über Gerstenkeime goss und die Pflanzen wuchsen unbehandelt, in beeindruckender Weise, heran. Aber, und dies ist der verblüffende Teil, wenn depressive psychiatrische Patienten den Wasserbehälter hielten, war das Wachstum der Samen deutlich verlangsamt.

‘Dr. Grad meinte, dass hier eine Art “X-Faktor” oder Energie, die vom menschlichen Körper fließt und Auswirkungen auf den Wachstum von Tieren und Pflanzen hat, aufkommt. Die Stimmung einer Person beeinflusst diese Energie. Diese zuvor unanerkannte „Energie“ hat weitreichende Auswirkungen auf die Medizinwissenschaften, von Heilung bis zu Labortests, sagte Grad.‘

Wie experimentell von Dr. Grad erforscht wurde, hat der Geist Einfluss auf Materie. Wenn dem so ist, werden viele notwendiger Weise den logischen Schluß ziehen, das Geist auch Geist beeinflußen kann. Wenn, daraus weiterführend, der menschliche Geist niedrigere Tiere beeinflussen kann, dann kann man daraus auch schließen, dass der Geist den Geist höherer Lebewesen als Tiere ebenfalls beeinflussen kann.

Fußnoten
1. Siehe unter Nr.. 2, 3, 4.
2. Siehe Einladung (aradhana) unten.
3. “Psychic Dicoveries Behind the Iron Curtain”, Sheila Ostrander & Lynn Schroeder, Bantam Books, U.S.A., Seite. 224; lese auch in "Healing with Thought," S. 293.


Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 10:52:53 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Einladung (aradhana)
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2013, 06:17:35 PM »
Invitation (aradhana)   

Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba dukkha vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam
Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba bhhya vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam
Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba roga vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam


That from misfortune I may be free
That all good luck should come to me
And also from anguish to be free
Chant "THE PROTECTION" I invite thee.

That from misfortune I may be free
That all good luck should come to me
Also from all fear to be free
Chant "THE PROTECTION" I invite thee.[1]

That from misfortune I may be free
That all good luck should come to me
And also from sickness to be free
Chant "THE PROTECTION" I invite thee.


Note
1. See above section on The Book of Protection.




Einladung (aradhana)   

Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba dukkha vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam
Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba bhhya vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam
Vipatti patibahaya -sabba sampatti siddhiya
Sabba roga vinasaya — parittam bratha mangalam


Das von Unglück, ich frei sein mag
Das alles Glück zu mir kommen mag
Und auch um von Angst frei zu sein
Rufe: “DEN SCHUTZ” lade ich hier ein.

Das von Unglück, ich frei sein mag
Das alles Glück zu mir kommen mag
Und auch um von Angst frei zu sein
Rufe: “DEN SCHUTZ” lade ich hier ein.

Das von Unglück, ich frei sein mag
Das alles Glück zu mir kommen mag
Und auch um von Angst frei zu sein
Rufe: “DEN SCHUTZ” lade ich hier ein.

Fußnote
1. Siehe oberen Abschnitt  Das Buch der Schutzvorkehrung


Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->

« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 11:10:51 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
I. Zuflucht nehmen (Sarana-gamana)
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2013, 06:21:48 PM »
I. Going for Refuge (Sarana-gamana [1])   

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

Homage to the Blessed One, the Consummate One,
the supremely Enlightened One

Buddham saranam gacchami
Dhammam saranam gacchami
Sangham saranam gacchami

Dutiyampi Buddham saranam gacchami
Dutiyampi Dhammam saranam gacchami
Dutiyampi Sangham saranam gacchami

Tatiyampi Buddham saranam gacchami
Tatiyampi Dhammam saranam gacchami
Tatiyampi Sangham saranam gacchami


I go for refuge to the Buddha (Teacher)
I go for refuge to the Dhamma (the Teaching)
I go for refuge to the Sangha (the Taught)

For the second time I go for refuge to the Buddha
For the second time I go for refuge to the Dhamma
For the second time I go for refuge to the Sangha

For the third time I go for refuge to the Buddha
For the third time I go for refuge to the Dhamma
For the third time I go for refuge to the Sangha

Note
1. Vin. I, 22 (cf. M. i. 24); Khp. No. 1.




I. Zuflucht nehmen (Sarana-gamana [1]) 

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

Verehrung Ihm, dem Erhabenen, dem Vollkommenen, dem Höchste-Erwachten!

Buddham saranam gacchami
Dhammam saranam gacchami
Sangham saranam gacchami

Dutiyampi Buddham saranam gacchami
Dutiyampi Dhammam saranam gacchami
Dutiyampi Sangham saranam gacchami

Tatiyampi Buddham saranam gacchami
Tatiyampi Dhammam saranam gacchami
Tatiyampi Sangham saranam gacchami

Ich nehme Zuflucht zu Buddha (Lehrer)
Ich nehme Zuflucht zum Dhamma (der Lehre)
Ich nehme Zuflucht zur Sangha (den Belehrten)

Zum zweiten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zu Buddha
Zum zweiten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zum Dhamma
Zum zweiten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zu Sangha

Zum dritten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zu Buddha
Zum dritten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zum Dhamma
Zum dritten Mal nehme ich Zuflucht zu Sangha

Fußnoten
1. Vin. I, 22 (vergleiche. M. I. 24); Khp. Nr. 1.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 09:02:34 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
II. Die zehn Tugendregeln (Dasa-sikkhapada)
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2013, 06:25:15 PM »
II. The Ten Training Precepts (Dasa-sikkhapada [1])    

1. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from killing.
2. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from stealing.
3. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from sexual misconduct.
4. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from lying.
5. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from liquor that causes intoxication and heedlessness.
6. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from untimely eating.
7. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from dancing, singing, music, and visiting unseemly shows.
8. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from the use of garlands, perfumes, cosmetics, and embellishments.
9. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from the use of high and luxurious beds.
10. I undertake to abide by the precept to abstain from accepting gold and silver.

Note
1. Khp. No. 2; cf. Vin. I, 83-84; Vbh. 285 ff.




II. Die zehn Tugendregeln (Dasa-sikkhapada [1])   

1. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens vom Töten, festzuhalten.
2. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens vom Stehlen, festzuhalten.
3. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens von sexuellem Fehlverhalten, festzuhalten.
4. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens vom Lügen, festzuhalten.
5. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens von Mittel die Berauschung und Gewissenlosigkeit verursachen, festzuhalten.
6. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens von nicht zeitgerechtem Essen, festzuhalten.
7. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens von Tanz, Musik und dem Aufsuchen unpassender Darbietungen, festzuhalten.
8. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens vom Gebrauch von Schmuck, Duftstoffen, Kosmetik und Verschönerungen, festzuhalten.
9. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens vom Nutzen von hohen und luxuriösen Liegen, festzuhalten.
10. Ich nehme mir vor, an der Tugendregel des Abstehens der Annahme von Gold und Silber, festzuhalten.

Fußnote
1. Khp. Nr. 2; siehe auch. Vin. I, 83-84; Vbh. 285 ff.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 09:46:48 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
III. Questions to be Answered by a Novice (Samanera Pañha [1])  

One is what? All beings subsist on food.[2]

Two is what? Name and form (mind and matter).
Three is what? Three kinds of feeling.
Four is what? Four Noble Truths.
Five is what? Five aggregates subject to grasping.
Six is what? Internal six-fold base.
Seven is what? Seven Factors of Enlightenment.
Eight is what? The Noble Eightfold Path.
Nine is what? Nine abodes of beings.
Ten is what? He that is endowed with ten attributes is called an arahant.

Notes
1. Also known as "Kumaro Pañha," Questions to be answered by the Young One. Khp. No. 4; cf. A. v. 50 ff; 55 ff. The novice referred to here is the seven-year old Sopaka. He was questioned by the Buddha. It is not a matter for surprise that a child of such tender years can give profound answers to these questions. One has heard of infant prodigies. (See Encyclopaedia Britannica. Inc., 1955, II. p. 389. Also read The Case for Rebirth, Francis Story, Wheel 12-13, Buddhist Publication Society, Kandy, Sri Lanka.)
2. See notes at the end of the book.




III. Fragen die von einem Novizen beantwortet werden sollen (Samanera Pañha [1]) 

Eins ist was? Alle Wesen bestehen fort aufgrund von Nahrung.[2]
Zwei ist was? Name und Form (Geist und Körper).
Drei ist was? Drei Arten von Gefühlen.
Vier ist was? Die Vier Edlen Wahrheiten.
Fünf ist was? Fünf Ansammlungen, dem Begehren unterworfen.
Sechs ist was? Der innerliche sechsfache Träger.
Sieben ist was? Die sieben Faktoren der Erleuchtung.
Acht ist was? Der Noble Achtfache Pfad.
Neun ist was? Neun Aufenthaltsorte von Lebewesen.
Zehn ist was? Jener, der mit den zehn Eigenschaften ausgestattet ist wird Arahant genannt.

Fußnoten
1. Auch bekannt unter "Kumaro Pañha," Fragen die von einem Neuling zu beantworten waren Khp. Nr. 4; vgl. A. v. 50 ff; 55 ff. Der Novize der hier angeführt ist, ist der sieben Jahre alte Sopaka. Er wurde von Buddha befragt. Es ist nicht verwunderlich das ein Kind, so junger Jahre, so profunde Antworten auf diese Fragen gibt. Man kennt so etwas als Wunderkinder. (Siehe “Encyclopaedia Britannica. Inc.”, 1955, II. S. 389. Lese ebenfalls “The Case for Rebirth”, Francis Story, Wheel 12-13, Buddhist Publication Society, Kandy, Sri Lanka.)
2. Siehe Bemerkungen am Ende des Buches



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 10:48:33 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
IV. Die zweiunddreißig Teile des Körpers (Dvattimsakara)
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2013, 06:31:39 PM »
IV. The Thirty-two Parts of the Body (Dvattimsakara [1])   

There are in this body head-hairs, body-hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, intestinal tract, stomach, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus, synovium (oil lubricating the joints), urine, and brain in the skull.

Note
1. Khp. No. 3; cf. D. ii, 293; M. I, 57; iii, 90. Also see below Girimananda sutta 15.




IV. Die zweiunddreißig Teile des Körpers (Dvattimsakara [1])   

Da sind in diesem Körper Kopfhaare, Körperhaare, Nägle, Zähne, Haut, Fleisch, Sehnen, Knochen, Knochenmark, Nieren, Herz, Leber, Brustfell, Milz, Lungen, Eingeweide, Darmtrakt, Magen, Fäkalien, Gallenflüssigkeit, Schleim, Eiter, Blut, Schweiß, Fett, Tränen, Fette, Speichel, Nasenschleim, Gelenkflüssigkeit, Urin und das Hirn im Schädel.

Fußnote
1. Khp. Nr. 3; vergleiche. D. II, 293; M. I, 57; III, 90. Siehe auch unten das Girimananda sutta 15.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 01:24:58 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
V. Die Vierfache Betrachtung eines Mönches (Paccavekkhana)
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2013, 06:34:39 PM »
V. The Fourfold Reflection of a Monk (Paccavekkhana [1])   

1. Wisely reflecting do I wear the robe, only in order to protect myself from cold, heat, gadflies, mosquitoes, wind, and sun and from snakes; and also as a constant covering for my modesty.

2. Wisely reflecting I will partake of food not for pleasure of it, not for the pride (resulting from physical strength obtainable), not for adornment, not for beautifying the body, but merely to maintain this body, to still the hunger, and to enable the practice of the holy life; also to resist the pangs of hunger (due to previous want of food), and to resist the pain (resulting from excess of food). Thus will my life be maintained free from wrong doing and free from discomfort.

3. Wisely reflecting I will make use of lodgings only in order to protect myself from cold and heat, from gadflies and mosquitoes; from wind and sun, from snakes, and also as a constant protection against the rigours of climate, and in order to realize that ardent desire for seclusion (which begets mental concentration).

4. Wisely reflecting I will make use of medicine only as an aid to eliminate bodily pains that have arisen, and also to maintain that important condition, freedom from disease.

Note
1. M. i. p. 10; cf. A. ii. 40; M. 53.




V. Die Vierfache Betrachtung eines Mönches (Paccavekkhana [1])  

1. Weise wiederbetrachtend, trage ich die Robe, nur um mich von vor Kälte, Hitze, Bremsen, Moskitos, Wind, Sonne und vor Schlangen zu schützen und auch als stete Bedeckung für meine Sittsamkeit.

2. Weise wiederbetrachtend, will ich am Essen teilhaben ohne dem Genuß daran, nicht für Stolz (der aus körperlicher Stärke rühren kann), nicht für mein Aussehen, nicht für die Verschönerung meines Körpers, jedoch lediglich um diesen Körper zu erhalten, um seinen Hunger zu stillen und um damit zu ermöglichen, das heilige Leben auszuüben, auch den Schmerz des Hungers zu stillen (der durch das vorangehende Verlangen nach Nahrung entstanden ist) und um dem Schmerz aus Nahrung (der aus der übermäßiger Nahrungsaufnahme resultiert) zu entgehen. So wird mein Leben frei von falschen Taten und frei von Unwohlsein erhalten.

3. Weise wiederbetrachtend, werde ich meine Unterkunft nur dazu nutzen, um mich vor Kälte und Hitze, von Bremsen und Moskitos, von Wind und Sonne und vor Schlangen zu schützen, wie auch als steten Schutz gegen die Härten des Klimas und in der Absicht das begeistertes Verlangen nach Einsamkeit (welches geistige Konzentration fördert) zu verwirklichen.

4. Weise wiederbetrachtend, will ich von Medizin nur dann gebrauchen, um körperlichen Schmerz, der entstanden ist, auszulöschen und auch um den wichtigen Zustand, frei von Krankheiten zu sein, zu erhalten.

Fußnote
1. M. I. p. 10; vergleiche A. II. 40; M. 53.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 01:57:10 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
Lehrreden - Rede von den Zehn Dingen (Dasa-dhamma sutta)
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2013, 07:04:19 PM »
Discourses

1. Discourse on the Ten Dhammas (Dasa-dhamma sutta [1])

Thus have I heard:

On one occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi at Jetavana at the monastery of Anathapindika.
Then the Blessed One addressed the monks, saying: "Monks." — "Venerable Sir," they said by way of reply. The Blessed One then spoke as follows:
"These ten essentials (dhammas) must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth (to live the holy life). What are these ten?

1. "'I am now changed into a different mode of life (from that of a layman).' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
2. "'My life depends on others.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
3. "'I must now behave in a different manner.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
4. "'Does my mind upbraid me regarding the state of my virtue (sila)?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
5. "'Do my discerning fellow-monks having tested me, reproach me regarding the state of my virtue?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
6. "'There will be a parting (some day) from all those who are dear and loving to me. Death brings this separation to me.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
7. "'Of kamma1 I am constituted. Kamma is my inheritance; kamma is the matrix; kamma is my kinsman; kamma is my refuge. Whatever kamma I perform, be it good or bad, to that I shall be heir.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
8. "'How do I spend my nights and days?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
9. "'Do I take delight in solitude?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.
10. "'Have I gained superhuman faculties? Have I gained that higher wisdom so that when I am questioned (on this point) by fellow-monks at the last moment (when death is approaching) I will have no occasion to be depressed and downcast?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

"These, monks, are the essentials that should be reflected again and again by one who has gone forth (to live the holy life)."
So spoke the Blessed One. Those monks rejoiced at the words of the Blessed One.

Notes
1. A. v. 87.
2. Literally action — mental, verbal, and physical.






Lehrreden

Rede von den Zehn Dingen (Dasa-dhamma sutta [1])

Dies habe ich gehört:

Zu einem Anlaß lebte der Erhabene im Kloster von Anathapindika, in Jetavana nahe Savattha.
Da wendete sich der Erhabene an die Mönche und sagte: „Bhikkhus“ – „Erhwürdiger Herr,“ sagten diese in erwidernder Weise. Der Erhabene sprach dann wie folgend:
„Diese wesentlichen zehn (Dhammas) müssen von jenem, der fortgezogen ist (um das heilige Leben zu führen) wieder und wieder betrachtet werden. Welche sind diese Zehn?

1.   „'Ich habe nun in eine anderes Leben (gegenüber jenem eines Laien) gewechselt' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
2.    „'Mein Leben hängt von anderen ab” Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
3. „'Ich muß mich nun in anderer Weise verhalten” Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
4. „'Rügt mich mein Geist im Bezug auf den Stand meiner Tugend (sila)?“ Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
5. „'Haben mich meine verständigen Mit-Mönche geprüft, mir Vorwürfe wegen des Standes meiner Tugend gemacht?' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
6. „'Es wird (eines Tages) ein Scheiden von allen, die mir lieb und zugetan sind, geben. Der Tod bringt diese Trennung über mich.' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
7. „'Aus kamma bin ich geformt. Kamma ist mein Nachlass, kamma ist das Grundgerüst, kamma ist mein Verwandter, kamma ist meine Zuflucht. Welch kamma ich auch tue, möge es gut oder schlecht sein, für dieses werde ich Erbe sein.' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
8. „'Auf welche Weise verbringe ich meine Nächte und Tage?' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
9. „'Erfreue ich mich an Einsamkeit?' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“
10. „'Habe ich übermenschliche Fähigkeiten erlangt? Habe ich höhere Weisheit erlangt, sodaß ich, wenn ich (über diese Sache) im letzten Moment (wenn der Tod bevorsteht), von meinen Mit-Mönchen gefragt, keinen Grund habe bestürzt oder niedergeschlagen zu sein?' Dies muß von jemanden, der fortgezogen ist, wieder und wieder betrachtet werden.“

“Diese, Bhikkhus, sind die Wesentlichen, die jeder der fortgezogen ist (um das heilige Leben zu leben) wieder und wieder betrachten werden sollten.“
So sprach der Erhabene. Die Mönche waren entzückt über die Worte des Erhabenen.

Fußnoten:
1    Wörtl. Handlung – mental, verbal und physisch
2    AN 10.48



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 02:39:48 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
2. Lehrrede über Segen (Maha-mangala Sutta)
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2013, 07:11:41 PM »
2. Discourse on Blessings (Maha-mangala Sutta [1])

Thus have I heard:
On one occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi at Jetavana at Anathapindika's monastery. Now when the night was far advanced, a certain deity, whose surpassing radiance illuminated the whole of Jetavana, approached the Blessed One, respectfully saluted him, and stood beside him. Standing thus, he addressed the Blessed One in verse:

1. "Many deities and men longing for happiness have pondered on (the question of) blessings. Pray tell me what the highest blessings are.
2. "Not to associate with the foolish, but to associate with the wise, and to honor those worthy of honor — this is the highest blessing.
3. "To reside in a suitable locality, to have performed meritorious actions in the past, and to set oneself in the right direction — this is the highest blessing.
4. "Vast learning, skill in handicrafts, well grounded in discipline, and pleasant speech — this is the highest blessing.
5. "To support one's father and mother; to cherish one's wife and children, and to be engaged in peaceful occupations — this is the highest blessing.
6. "Liberality, righteous conduct, rendering assistance to relatives, and performance of blameless deeds — this is the highest blessing.
7. "To cease and abstain from evil, to abstain from intoxicating drinks, and diligent in performing righteous acts — this is the highest blessing.
8. "Reverence, humility, contentment, gratitude, and the timely hearing of the Dhamma, the teaching of the Buddha — this is the highest blessing.
9. "Patience, obedience, meeting the Samanas (holy men), and timely discussions on the Dhamma — this is the highest blessing.
10. "Self-control, chastity, comprehension of the Noble Truths, and the realization of Nibbana — this is the highest blessing.
11. "The mind that is not touched by the vicissitudes of life,[2] the mind that is free from sorrow, stainless, and secure — this is the highest blessing.
12. "Those who have fulfilled the conditions (for such blessings) are victorious everywhere, and attain happiness everywhere — To them these are the highest blessings."

Notes
1. Khp. No. 5; Sn. 46 under the title Mangala sutta; cf. Mahamangala Jataka No. 452.
2. The vicissitudes are eight in number: gain and loss, good-repute and ill-repute, praise and blame, joy and sorrow. This stanza is a reference to the state of mind of an arahant, the Consummate One.




2. Lehrrede über Segen (Maha-mangala Sutta [1])  

Dies habe ich gehört:
Zu einem Anlaß lebte der Erhabene in Anathapindikas Kloster in Jetavana, nahe Savatthi. Nun als die Nacht schon weit fortgeschritten war, wendete sich eine gewisse Gottheit, deren überdurchschnittliche Ausstrahlung ganz Jetavana erhellte, dem Erhabenen zu, begrüßten ihn respektvoll und stellten sich an seine Seite. Dort stehend, richteten er dieses in Versen an den Erhabenen:

1. „Viele Gottheiten und Menschen, auf der Suche nach Glück haben über (die Frage von) Segen nachgesinnt. Inständig bittend, sagt mir, was die höchsten Segen sind.
2. „Nicht mit Dummen zu verkehren, sich jedoch mit den Weisen abzugeben und jene zu ehren, die es wert sind geehrt zu werden: dies ist der höchste Segen.
3. „An einem angemessenen Platz zu leben, heilsame Taten in der Vergangenheit erbracht zu haben, und sich selbst in die Richtung zu begeben: dies ist der höchste Segen.
4. „Ausgedehnte Gelehrtheit, Geschick im Handwerk, gut gefestigt im Verhalten und wohltuende Sprache: dies ist der höchste Segen.
5. „Seinen Vater und seine Mutter zu unterstützen, seine Frau und Kinder zu würdigen und sich friedvollen Beschäftigungen nachzugehen: dies ist der höchste Segen.
6. „Großzügigkeit, rechtschaffenes Verhalten, Unterstützung den Verwandten leisten und tadellose Handlungen zu vollziehen: dies ist der höchste Segen.
7. „Von Bösem Abstand nehmen und enthalten, von berauschenden Mitteln abzustehen und gewissenhaft im ausführen von rechtschaffenen Handlungen: dies ist der höchste Segen.
8. „Ehrfurcht, Bescheidenheit, Zufriedenheit, Dankbarkeit und zeitgerecht das Dhamma, die Lehren Buddhas, zu hören: dies ist der höchste Segen.
9. „Geduld, Belehrbarkeit, die Samanas (heiligen Menschen) treffen und zeitgerechte Diskussionen über das Dhamma: dies ist der höchste Segen.
10 „Beherrschtheit, Keuschheit, die Vier Edlen Wahrheiten zu begreifen und die Verwirklichung von Nibbana: dies ist der höchste Segen.
11. „Der Geist der nicht von den Wechselhaftigkeit des Lebens, der Geist der frei von Sorge, makellos und sicher ist : dies ist der höchste Segen.
12 „Jene die die Voraussetzungen (für solchen Segen) erfüllt haben, werden überall siegreich sein und Freude Allerorts erlangen: für jene sind diese die höchsten Segen.

Fußnoten
1. Khp. Nr. 5; Sn. 46 unter dem Titel Mangala sutta; vlg. Mahamangala Jataka Nr. 452.
2. Die Launen sind acht an der Zahl: Gewinn und Verlust, gutes Ansehen und schlechter Ruf, Lob und Tadel, Freude und Leid. Diese Strophe nimmt Bezug auf die Geisteshaltung eines Arahants, einem Vollständigen.




Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 04:11:43 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
3. Die Juwelen Lehrrede (Ratana Sutta)
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2013, 07:18:59 PM »
3. The Jewel Discourse (Ratana Sutta [1])   

The occasion for this discourse, in brief, according to the commentary, is as follows: The city of Vesali was afflicted by a famine, causing death, especially to the poor folk. Due to the presence of decaying corpses the evil spirits began to haunt the city; this was followed by a pestilence. Plagued by these three fears of famine, non-human beings and pestilence, the citizens sought the help of the Buddha who was then living at Rajagaha.
Followed by a large number of monks including the Venerable Ananda, his attendant disciple, the Buddha came to the city of Vesali. With the arrival of the Master, there were torrential rains which swept away the putrefying corpses. The atmosphere became purified, the city was clean.

Thereupon the Buddha delivered this Jewel Discourse (Ratana sutta[2]) to the Venerable Ananda, and gave him instructions as to how he should tour the city with the Licchavi citizens reciting the discourse as a mark of protection to the people of Vesali. The Venerable Ananda followed the instructions, and sprinkled the sanctified water from the Buddha's own alms bowl. As a consequence the evil spirits were exorcised, the pestilence subsided. Thereafter the Venerable Ananda returned with the citizens of Vesali to the Public hall where the Buddha and his disciples had assembled awaiting his arrival. There the Buddha recited the same Jewel Discourse to the gathering: [3]

1. "Whatever beings (non-humans) are assembled here, terrestrial or celestial, may they all have peace of mind, and may they listen attentively to these words:

2. "O beings, listen closely. May you all radiate loving-kindness to those human beings who, by day and night, bring offerings to you (offer merit to you). Wherefore, protect them with diligence.

3. "Whatever treasure there be either in the world beyond, whatever precious jewel there be in the heavenly worlds, there is nought comparable to the Tathagata (the perfect One). This precious jewel is the Buddha.[4] By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

4. "That Cessation, that Detachment, that Deathlessness (Nibbana) supreme, the calm and collected Sakyan Sage (the Buddha) had realized. There is nought comparable to this (Nibbana) Dhamma. This precious jewel is the Dhamma.[5] By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

5. "The Supreme Buddha extolled a path of purity (the Noble Eightfold Path) calling it the path which unfailingly brings concentration. There is nought comparable to this concentration. This precious jewel is the Dhamma. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

6. "The eight persons extolled by virtuous men constitute four pairs. They are the disciples of the Buddha and are worthy of offerings. Gifts given to them yield rich results. This precious jewel is the Sangha.[6] By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

7. "With a steadfast mind, and applying themselves well in the dispensation of the Buddha Gotama, free from (defilements), they have attained to that which should be attained (arahantship) encountering the Deathless. They enjoy the Peace of Nibbana freely obtained.[7] This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

8. "As a post deep-planted in the earth stands unshaken by the winds from the four quarters, so, too, I declare is the righteous man who comprehends with wisdom the Noble Truths. This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

9. "Those who realized the Noble Truths well taught by him who is profound in wisdom (the Buddha), even though they may be exceedingly heedless, they will not take an eighth existence (in the realm of sense spheres).[8] This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

10. "With his gaining of insight he abandons three states of mind, namely self-illusion, doubt, and indulgence in meaningless rites and rituals, should there be any. He is also fully freed from the four states of woe, and therefore, incapable of committing the six major wrongdoings.[9] This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

11. "Any evil action he may still do by deed, word or thought, he is incapable of concealing it; since it has been proclaimed that such concealing is impossible for one who has seen the Path (of Nibbana).[10] This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

12. "As the woodland groves though in the early heat of the summer month are crowned with blossoming flowers even so is the sublime Dhamma leading to the (calm) of Nibbana which is taught (by the Buddha) for the highest good. This precious jewel is the Buddha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

13. "The Peerless Excellent one (the Buddha) the Knower (of Nibbana), the Giver (of Nibbana), the Bringer (of the Noble Path), taught the excellent Dhamma. This precious jewel is the Buddha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

14. "Their past (kamma) is spent, their new (kamma) no more arises, their mind to future becoming is unattached. Their germ (of rebirth-consciousness) has died, they have no more desire for re-living. Those wise men fade out (of existence) as the flame of this lamp (which has just faded away). This precious jewel is the Sangha. By this (asseveration of the) truth may there be happiness.

15. "Whatever beings (non-human) are assembled here, terrestrial or celestial, come let us salute the Buddha, the Tathagata (the perfect One), honored by gods and men. May there be happiness.[11]

16. "Whatever beings are assembled here terrestrial or celestial, come let us salute the perfect Dhamma, honored by gods and men. May there be happiness.

17. "Whatever beings are assembled here terrestrial or celestial, come let us salute the perfect Sangha, honored by gods and men. May there be happiness."

Notes
1. Khp. No. 6; Sn. 39
2. Ratana means precious jewel. Here the term is applied to the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha.
3. KhpA. 161.
4. Literally, in the Buddha is this precious jewel.
5. Literally, in the Dhamma is this precious jewel.
6. Literally, in the Sangha is this precious jewel.
7. Obtained without payment; "avyayena," KhpA. I., 185.
8. The reason why it is stated that there will be no eighth existence for a person who has attained the stage of sotapatti or the first stage of sanctity is that such a being can live at the most for only a period of seven existences in the realm of sense spheres.
9. Abhithanani; i. matricide, ii. patricide, iii. the murder of arahants (the Consummate Ones), iv. the shedding of the Buddha's blood, v. causing schism in the Sangha, and vi. pernicious false beliefs (niyata micca ditthi).
10. He is a sotapanna, stream-enterer, one who has attained the first stage of sanctity. Also see Notes at the end of the book.
11. The last three stanzas were recited by Sakka, the chief of Devas (gods), KhpA. 195.






3. Die Juwelen Lehrrede (Ratana Sutta [1])

Die Begebenheit zu dieser Lehrrede, in kürze, entsprechend den Kommentaren, ist da folgende: Die Stadt von Vesali war von einer Hungersnot heimgesucht, diese verursachte Tod, speziell unter den armen Volk. Durch die Anwesenheit verwesender Leichen, begannen böse Geister die Stadt heimzusuchen. Dies war gefolgt von einer Pestilenz. Geplagt von diesen drei Angsten vor der Hungersnot, nichtmenschlichen Wesen und der Pest, strebten die Einwohner nach Hilfe von Buddha, der gerade in Rajagaha lebte.

Gefolgt von einer großen Zahl von Mönchen und dem ehrenwerten Ananda, seinem treudienenden Schüler, kam Buddha zu der Stadt von Vesali. Mit der Ankunft des Meister, kamen sintflutartige Regenfälle und schwemmten die verfaulenden Leichen weg. Die Atmosphere wurde klar und die Stadt war rein.

Daraufhin legte Buddha dem ehrenwerten Ananda die Juwelen Lehrrede (Ratana sutta[2]) dar, und gab ihm Anweisungen, wie er mit den Bürgern von Licchayi, den Diskurs rezitierend, eine Runde durch die Stadt machen sollte, um den Menschen von Vesali ein Zeichen des Schutzes zu geben. Der ehrwürdige Ananda folgte den Anweisungen und sprenkelte das gesegnete Wasser aus Buddhas eigener Bettelschale. Als Folge daraus, waren die bösen Geister vertrieben, die Seuche im Nachlassen. Danach kehrte der ehrwürdige Ananda mit den Bürgern von Vesali in die Versammlungshalle, wo Buddha und seine Schüler gemeinsam auf seine Rückkehr warteten, zurück. Dort rezitierte Buddha die selbe Juwelen Lehrrede vor der Versammlung: [3]

1. „Welch Wesen (nicht menschlich) hier auch versammelt sein mögen, irdisch oder himmlisch, mögen sie alle Frieden im Geist haben und mögen sie alle aufmerksam dies Worte hören:

2. „O Wesen, hört genau. Möget Ihr alle liebevolle Freundlichkeit, an diese menschlichen Wesen ausstrahlen , die Tag und Nacht euch Gaben opfern (euch Verdienste darbieten). Deswegen, beschütz sie mit Gewissenhaftigkeit.

3. „Was auch immer da Schätze seien mögen, in dieser Welt oder darüber hinaus, was auch immer an kostbaren Juwelen dort in den himmlischen Welten sind, da ist nichts vergleichbar mit dem Tathagata (den Perfekten). Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist der Buddha.[4] Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

4. „Diese Beendigung, diese Freisetzung, diese Todlosigkeit (Nibbana) erhaben, die der gestillte und gesammelte Sakyan Weise (Buddha) verwirklicht hat. Da ist nichts vergeleichbar mit diesem (Nibbana) Dhamma. Dieser wertvolle Juwel ist das Dhamma.[5] Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

5. „Der erhabene Buddha erhob einen Pfad der Reinheit (den Noblen Achtfachen Pfad) lobend, nennt ihn den Pfad der unfehlbar Konzentration mit sich bringt. Da ist nichts vergleichbar zu dieser Konzentration. Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist das Dhamma. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

6. „Die acht Personen, lobend erhoben von dem tugendhaften Mann, formen vier Paare. Jene sind die Schüler des Buddhas und wert der Darbietungen. Gaben an jene werfen große Erträge ab. Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha.[6] Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

7. „Mit standhaftem Geist, und sich selbst geschickt an der Befreiung von Buddha Gotama haltend, befreit davon (Veruntrübungen), haben sie erreicht was erreichen werden sollte (Arahantschaft), mit der Todlosigkeit in Berührung gekommen. Sie genießen den Frieden von Nibbana, frei erwirkt.[7] Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

8. „Wie eine Säule tief verankert in der Erde unerschüttert von den Winden, aus allen vier Richtungen, steht, so erkläre ich, ist ein rechtschaftender Mann, der mit Weisheit die Edlen Wahrheiten begreift. Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

9. „Jene, welche die Edlen Wahrheiten erkennen, gut unterrichtet von ihm, der tiefgründig in Weisheit (Buddha), selbst wenn diese in hohem Maße unachtsam sind, werden sie keine achte Existenz (in den Bereichen Sinnesshären) annehmen.[8] Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

10. „Mit dem Erreichen von Einsicht legt er drei Geisteshaltungen ab, nämlich Selbst-Glaube, Zweifel und die Hingabe in bedeutungslosen Riten und Gebäuchen, sollten da welche sein. Er ist ebenso gänzlich von den vier Zuständen des Elends befreit und deshalb außerstande eine der sechs Hauptverfehlungen zu begehen.[9] Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

11. „Jede üble Handlung die er nun noch begeht, in Taten, im Worte oder Gedanken, ist außerstande sie zu verbergen, da ihm bekundet, daß solches Verschleiern unmöglich ist, für jenen der den Pfad (zu Nibbana) erkannt.[10] Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

12. „So wie Waldland, in der frühen Hitze der Sommermonate, gekrönt von gedeienden Blüten ist, eben so leitet das erhabene Dhamma zur (Gestilltheit) von Nibbana, das gelehrt (von Buddha) als das höchsten Wohl. Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist der Buddha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

13. „Der unvergleichlich Vortreffliche (Buddha), der Wissende (von Nibbana), der Geber (von Nibbana), der Bringer (des Noblen Pfades), lehrte das vortreffliche Dhamma. Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist der Buddha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.

14. „Ihr Vergangenes (kamma) ist erschopft, ihr Neues (kamma) kommt nicht mehr auf, ihr Geist ist abgelöst von zukünftigem Werden. Ihr Keim (des Wiedergeburts-Bewußtseins) ist gestorben, sie haben kein Verlangen nach Wiedererleben. Diese Weisen Menschen erlöschen (aus der Existenz) wie die Flamme dieser Lampe (welche eben erloschen ist). Dieses wertvolle Juwel ist die Sangha. Mit dieser (Beteuerung der) Wahrheit, möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.“

15 „Welch Wesen (nicht menschlich) hier auch versammelt sein mögen, irdisch oder himmlisch, kommt last uns Buddha, den Tathagata (den Perfekten), geehrt von Göttern und Mensch, ehren. Möge da Glückseligkeit sein.[11]

16. „Welch Wesen (nicht menschlich) hier auch versammelt sein mögen, irdisch oder himmlisch, kommt last uns das vollkommene Dhamma ehren. Möge da Glückseligkeit sein.

17. „Welch Wesen (nicht menschlich) hier auch versammelt sein mögen, irdisch oder himmlisch, kommt last uns die vollkommene Sangha ehren. Möge hier Glückseligkeit sein.“



Fußnoten
1. Khp. Nr. 6; Sn. 39
2. Ratana bedeutet wertvoller Juwell. Hier ist dieser Ausdruck Buddha, Dhamma und Sangha zugewiesen.
3. KhpA. 161.
4. Wortgetreu: in Buddha ist dieses wertvolle Juwel.
5. Wortgetreu: in Dhamma ist dieses wertvolle Juwel.
6. Wortgetreu: in Sangha ist dieses wertvolle Juwel.
7. Ohne Gegenleistung erhalten; "avyayena," KhpA. I., 185.
8. Der Grund, warum hier angegeben ist, daß hier nach keine achte Existenz für eine Person, die den Grad eines “sotapatti”, oder die erste Stufe von Heiligkeit erreicht hat ist, daß so ein Wesen nur mehr für eine Periode von sieben Existenzen in den Ebenen der Sinnesspären leben wird.
9. Abhithanani; i. Muttermord, ii. Vatermord, iii. das Ermorden eines Arahants (der Vollendete), iv. das Vergießen von Buddhas Blut, v. Eine Spaltung in der Sangha verursachen, und vi. verderblicher falscher Glaube (niyata micca ditthi).
10. Er ist ein sotapanna, Stromerreichender, einer der die erste Stufe der Heiligkeit erreicht hat. Siehe auch Bemerkungen am Ende des Buches.
11. Die letzten drei Absätze wurden von Sakka, dem König der Devas (Götter) rezitiert. KhpA. 195.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 06:52:40 PM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Offline Johann

  • Samanera
  • Very Engaged Member
  • *
  • Sadhu! or +369/-0
  • Gender: Male
  • Date of ordination/Datum der Ordination.: 20140527
4. Lehrrede über liebevolle Freundlichkeit (Karaniya Metta Sutta)
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2013, 07:24:58 PM »
4. Discourse on Loving-kindness (Karaniya Metta Sutta [1]) 

While the Buddha was staying at Savatthi, a band of monks, having received subjects of meditation from the master, proceeded to a forest to spend the rainy season (vassana). The tree deities inhabiting this forest were worried by their arrival, as they had to descend from tree abodes and dwell on the ground. They hoped, however, the monks would leave soon; but finding that the monks would stay the vassana period of three months, harassed them in diverse ways, during the night with the intention of scaring them away.
Living under such conditions being impossible, the monks went to the Master and informed him of their difficulties. Thereon the Buddha instructed them in the Metta sutta and advised their return equipped with this sutta for their protection.

The monks went back to the forest, and practicing the instruction conveyed, permeated the whole atmosphere with their radiant thoughts of metta or loving-kindness. The deities so affected by this power of love, henceforth allowed them to meditate in peace.
The discourse gets divided into two parts. The first detailing the standard of moral conduct required by one who wishes to attain Purity and Peace, and the second the method of practice of metta. [2]

1. "He who is skilled in (working out his own) well being, and who wishes to attain that state of Calm (Nibbana) should act thus: he should be dexterous, upright, exceedingly upright, obedient, gentle, and humble.

2. "Contented, easily supportable, with but few responsibilities, of simple livelihood, controlled in the senses, prudent, courteous, and not hanker after association with families.

3. "Let him not perform the slightest wrong for which wise men may rebuke him. (Let him think:) 'May all beings be happy and safe. May they have happy minds.'

4.& 5. "Whatever living beings there may be — feeble or strong (or the seekers and the attained) long, stout, or of medium size, short, small, large, those seen or those unseen, those dwelling far or near, those who are born as well as those yet to be born — may all beings have happy minds.

6. "Let him not deceive another nor despise anyone anywhere. In anger or ill will let him not wish another ill.

7. "Just as a mother would protect her only child with her life even so let one cultivate a boundless love towards all beings.

8. "Let him radiate boundless love towards the entire world — above, below, and across — unhindered, without ill will, without enmity.

9. "Standing, walking, sitting or reclining, as long as he is awake, let him develop this mindfulness. This, they say, is 'Noble Living' here.

10. "Not falling into wrong views — being virtuous, endowed with insight, lust in the senses discarded — verily never again will he return to conceive in a womb."

Notes
1. Khp. No. 9.; Sn. 25, under the title Metta-sutta.
2. KhpA. 232.






4. Lehrrede über liebevolle Freundlichkeit (Karaniya Metta Sutta [1])  

Während Buddha in Savatthi verweilte, zog eine Gruppe von Mönchen, die vom Meister einen Gegenstand der Meditation bekommen hatten, in einem Wald um die Regensaison (vassana). zu verbringen. Die Baumgottheiten die diesen Wald bewohnten, waren beunruhigt durch deren Ankunft, so sie von den Baumkronen herunter steigen mussten und verweilten am Boden. Sie hofften dennoch, dass die Mönche bald scheiden würden. Aber als sie heraus fanden, dass die Mönche die vassana Zeit von drei Monate bleiben würden, schikanierten sie sie in der Nacht in verschiedener Weise, mit der Absicht sie zu verscheuchen.

Unter solchen Bedingungen zu leben war unmöglich, und so gingen die Mönche zum Meister und informierten ihn über ihre Schwierigkeiten. Darauf wies Buddha sie in das Metta Sutta ein und riet ihnen, gerüstet mit diesem Sutta zum Schutz, zurückzugehen.

Die Mönche kehrten in den Wald zurück, und praktizierten die vermittelten Anweisungen, durchdrangen die gesamte Atmosphäre mit ihren strahlenden Gedanken von metta oder liebevoller Freundlichkeit. Die Gottheiten, so betroffen von der Macht der Liebe, ließen sie nunmehr in Frieden meditieren.

Die Lehrrede teilt sich in zwei Abschnitte. Der erste handelt über die Anforderung im Lebenswandel die für jenen notwendig ist, der Reinheit und Frieden erlangen möchte und der zweite von der Methode metta zu praktizieren. [2]

1. „Jener der geschickt im (Herausarbeiten seines) Wohlergehen und wünscht den Zustand von Stille (Nibbana) zu erreichen, sollte in dieser Weise handeln: er sollte gewandt sein, aufrecht, in hohem Maße rechtschaffend, folgsam, höflich und bescheiden.

2. „Zufrieden, leicht zu unterstützen, mit nur wenigen Pflichten sein, von einfacher Lebensweise, in seinen Sinnen kontrolliert, umsichtig, zuvorkommend und nicht danach Gesellschaft mit Familien sehnen.

3. „Lasst ihn nicht das geringste Schlechte tun, für welches ihn ein weiser Mann rügen würde. (Lasst ihn denken: ) 'Mögen alle Lebewesen glücklich und sicher sein. Mögen sie einen glücklichen Geistes haben.'“

4&5 „Welch lebende Wesen da immer auch seien – kraftlos oder stark (oder Suchende und Verwirklichte), lange, beleibt, oder von mittlerer Größe, kurz, klein, groß, gesehene oder ungesehene, im Nahen oder im Fernen verweilend, jetzt schon geboren, wie auch jene die nun am werden sind – mögen alle Lebewesen einen glücklichen Geist haben.

6. „Lasst ihn niemanden täuschen oder irgendwo jemanden verachten. Im Ärger oder Übelwollen, lasst ihn keinem anderen Übel wünschen.

7. „Gerade so wie eine Mutter ihr einziges Kind selbst mit ihrem Leben beschützt, eben so, lasst ihn grenzenlose Liebe gegenüber allen Lebewesen kultivieren.

8. „Lasst ihm grenzenlose Liebe gegenüber der gesamten Welt ausstrahlen – oben, unten und herum – ungehindert, ohne Übelwollen, ohne Feindseligkeit.

9. „Stehend, gehend, sitzend oder lehnend, so lange er wach, lasst ihm Achtsamkeit entwickeln. Dieses ist, sagen sie, das 'Noble Leben' hier.

10. „Nicht falschen Ansichten verfallen – tugendhaft sein, mit Einsicht ausgestattet, Lust nach in die Sinne abgelegt – wahrlich nie mehr wieder, wird er zurückkehren in einem Mutterleib.“


Fußnote
1. Khp. Nr. 9.; Sn. 25, unter dem Titel Metta-sutta.
2. KhpA. 232.



Zurück zum Verzeichnis -->
« Last Edit: January 23, 2014, 10:48:58 AM by Johann »
This post and Content has come to be by Dhamma-Dana and so is given as it       Dhamma-Dana: Johann

Tags: