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Panditavagga

Panditavagga

Summary:

Dhp VI PTS: Dhp 76-89

Panditavagga

translated from the Pali by

Daw Mya Tin

edited by

Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association

Alternate translation: Thanissaro | Buddharakkhita | Ven. Varado

Radhatthera Vatthu

Nidhīnaṃva pavattāraṃ, yaṃ passe vajjadassinaṃ; Niggayhavādiṃ medhāviṃ, tādisaṃ paṇḍitaṃ bhaje; Tādisaṃ bhajamānassa, seyyo hoti na pāpiyo.

VERSE 76: One should follow a man of wisdom who rebukes one for one's faults, as one would follow a guide to some buried treasure. To one who follows such a wise man, it will be an advantage and not a disadvantage. Story to Dhp 76

Assajipunabbasuka Vatthu

Ovadeyyānusāseyya(1), asabbhā ca nivāraye; Satañhi so piyo hoti, asataṃ hoti appiyo.

VERSE 77: The man of wisdom should admonish others; he should give advice and should prevent others from doing wrong; such a man is held dear by the good; he is disliked only by the bad. Story to Dhp 77

Channatthera Vatthu

Na bhaje pāpake mitte, na bhaje purisādhame; Bhajetha mitte kalyāṇe, bhajetha purisuttame.

VERSE 78: One should not associate with bad friends, nor with the vile. One should associate with good friends, and with those who are noble. Story to Dhp 78

Mahakappinatthera Vatthu

Dhammapīti sukhaṃ seti, vippasannena cetasā; Ariyappavedite dhamme, sadā ramati paṇḍito.

VERSE 79: He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas). Story to Dhp 79

Panditasamanera Vatthu

Udakañhi nayanti nettikā, usukārā namayanti tejanaṃ; Dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā, attānaṃ damayanti paṇḍitā.

VERSE 80: Farmers (lit., makers of irrigation canals) channel the water; fletchers straighten the arrow; carpenters work the timber; the Wise tame themselves. Story to Dhp 80

Lakundakabhaddiyatthera Vatthu

Selo yathā ekaghano, vātena na samīrati; Evaṃ nindāpasaṃsāsu, na samiñjanti paṇḍitā.

VERSE 81: As a mountain of rock is unshaken by wind, so also, the wise are unperturbed by blame or by praise. Story to Dhp 81

Kanamata Vatthu

Yathāpi rahado gambhīro, vippasanno anāvilo; Evaṃ dhammāni sutvāna, vippasīdanti paṇḍitā.

VERSE 82: Like a lake which is deep, clear and calm, the wise after listening to the Teaching (Dhamma) become serene. Story to Dhp 82

Pancasatabhikkhu Vatthu

Sabbattha ve sappurisā cajanti, na kāmakāmā lapayanti santo; Sukhena phuṭṭhā atha vā dukhena, na uccāvacaṃ paṇḍitā dassayanti.

VERSE 83: Indeed, the virtuous give up all (i.e., attachment to the five khandhas, etc.); the virtuous (lit., the tranquil) do not talk with sensual desire; when faced with joy or sorrow, the wise do not show elation or depression. Story to Dhp 83

Dhammikatthera Vatthu

Na attahetu na parassa hetu, na puttamicche na dhanaṃ na raṭṭhaṃ; Na iccheyya adhammena samiddhimattano, sa sīlavā paññavā dhammiko siyā.

VERSE 84: For his own sake or for the sake of others, he does no evil; nor does he wish for sons and daughters or for wealth or for a kingdom by doing evil; nor does he wish for success by unfair means; such a one is indeed virtuous, wise and just. Story to Dhp 84

Dhammassavana Vatthu

Appakā te manussesu, ye janā pāragāmino; Athāyaṃ itarā pajā, tīramevānudhāvati(2). Ye ca kho sammadakkhāte, dhamme dhammānuvattino; Te janā pāramessanti(3), maccudheyyaṃ(4) suduttaraṃ.

VERSE 85 & 86: Few among men reach the other shore (Nibbana); all the others only run up and down on this shore. But those who practise according to the well-expounded Dhamma will reach the other shore (Nibbana), having passed the realm of Death (i.e., samsara), very difficult as it is to cross. Story to Dhp 85 & 86

Pancasata Agantukabhikkhu Vatthu

Kaṇhaṃ dhammaṃ vippahāya, sukkaṃ bhāvetha paṇḍito; Okā anokamāgamma(5), viveke(5a) yattha dūramaṃ. Tatrābhiratimiccheyya, hitvā kāme akiñcano(6); Pariyodapeyya attānaṃ, cittaklesehi(7) paṇḍito. Yesaṃ sambodhiyaṅgesu(8) sammā cittaṃ subhāvitaṃ; Ādānapaṭinissagge, anupādāya ye ratā; Khīṇāsavā(9) jutimanto(10) te loke parinibbutā(11).

VERSES 87 & 88: The man of wisdom, leaving the home of craving and having Nibbana as his goal, should give up dark, evil ways and cultivate pure, good ones. He should seek great delight in solitude, detachment and Nibbana, which an ordinary man finds so difficult to enjoy. He should also give up sensual pleasures, and clinging to nothing, should cleanse himself of all impurities of the mind.

VERSE 89: Those, with mind well-developed in the seven Factors of Enlightenment (bojjhanga), having rid themselves of all craving, rejoice in their abandonment of attachment. Such men, with all moral intoxicants eradicated, and powerful (with the light of Arahatta Magganana), have realized Nibbana in this world (i.e., with Khandha aggregates remaining). Story to Dhp 87-89

The Story of Thera Radha

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (76) of this book, with reference to Thera Radha, who was at one time a poor old Brahmin.

Radha was a poor brahmin who stayed in the monastery doing small services for the bhikkhus. For his services he was provided with food and clothing and other needs, but was not encouraged to join the Order, although he had a strong desire to become a bhikkhu.

One day, early in the morning, when the Buddha surveyed the world with his supernormal power, he saw the poor old brahmin in his vision and knew that he was due for arahatship. So the Buddha went to the old man, and learned from him that the bhikkhus of the monastery did not want him to join the Order. The Buddha therefore called all the bhikkhus to him and asked them, “Is there any bhikkhu here who recollects any good turn done to him by this old man?” To this question, the Venerable Sariputta replied, “Venerable Sir, I do recollect an instance when this old man offered me a spoonful of rice.” “If that be so,” the Buddha said, “shouldn't you help your benefactor get liberated from the ills of life?” Then the Venerable Sariputta agreed to make the old man a bhikkhu and he was duly admitted to the Order. The Venerable Sariputta guided the old bhikkhu and the old bhikkhu strictly followed his guidance. Within a few days, the old bhikkhu attained arahatship.

When the Buddha next came to see the bhikkhus, they reported to him how strictly the old bhikkhu followed the guidance of the Venerable Sariputta. To them, the Buddha replied that a bhikkhu should be amenable to guidance like Radha, and should not resent when rebuked for any fault or failing.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 76: One should follow a man of wisdom who rebukes one for one's faults, as one would follow a guide to some buried treasure. To one who follows such a wise man, it will be an advantage and not a disadvantage.

The Story of the Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (77) of this book, with reference to the Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka.

The Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka and their five hundred disciples were staying at Kitagiri village. While staying there they made their living by planting flowering plants and fruit trees for gain, thus violating the rules of Fundamental Precepts for bhikkhus.

The Buddha hearing about these bhikkhus sent his two Chief Disciples Sariputta and Maha Moggallana, to stop them from committing further misconduct. To his two Chief Disciples the Buddha said, “Tell those bhikkhus not to destroy the faith and generosity of the lay disciples by misconduct and if anyone should disobey, drive him out of the monastery. Do not hesitate to do as I told you, for only fools dislike being given good advice and being forbidden to do evil.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 77: The man of wisdom should admonish others; he should give advice and should prevent others from doing wrong; such a man is held dear by the good; he is disliked only by the bad.

The Story of Thera Channa

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (78) of this book, with reference to Thera Channa.

Channa was the attendant who accompanied Prince Siddhattha when he renounced the world and left the palace on horseback. When the prince attained Buddhahood, Channa also became a bhikkhu. As a bhikkhu, he was very arrogant and overbearing because of his close connection to the Buddha. Channa used to say, “I came along with my Master when he left the palace for the forest. At that time, I was the only companion of my Master and there was no one else. But now, Sariputta and Moggallana are saying, 'we are the Chief Disciples,' and are strutting about the place.”

When the Buddha sent for him and admonished him for his behaviour, he kept silent but continued to abuse and taunt the two Chief Disciples. Thus the Buddha sent for him and admonished him three times; still, he did not change. And again, the Buddha sent for Channa and said, “Channa, these two noble bhikkhus are good friends to you; you should associate with them and be on good terms with them.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 78: One should not associate with bad friends, nor with the vile. One should associate with good friends, and with those who are noble.

In spite of repeated admonitions and advice given by the Buddha, Channa did as he pleased and continued to scold and abuse the bhikkhus. The Buddha, knowing this, said that Channa would not change during the Buddha's lifetime but after his demise (parinibbana) Channa would surely change. On the eve of his parinibbana, the Buddha called Thera Ananda to his bedside and instructed him to impose the Brahma-punishment (Brahmadanda) to Channa; i.e., for the bhikkhus to simply ignore him and to have nothing to do with him.

After the parinibbana of the Buddha, Channa, learning about the punishment from Thera Ananda, felt a deep and bitter remorse for having done wrong and he fainted three times. Then, he owned up his guilt to the bhikkhus and asked for pardon. From that moment, he changed his ways and outlook. He also obeyed their instructions in his meditation practice and soon attained arahatship.

The Story of Thera Mahakappina

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (79) of this book, with reference to Thera Mahakappina.

Mahakappina was king of Kukkutavati. He had a queen named Anoja; he also had one thousand ministers to help him rule the country. One day, the king accompanied by those one thousand ministers, was out in the park. There, they met some merchants from Savatthi. On learning about the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Samgha from these merchants the king and his ministers immediately set out for Savatthi.

On that day, when the Buddha surveyed the world with his supernormal power, he saw in his vision, Mahakappina and his ministers coming towards Savatthi. He also knew that they were due for arahatship. The Buddha went to a place one hundred and twenty yojanas away from Savatthi to meet them. There, he waited for them under a banyan tree on the bank of the river Candabhaga. King Mahakappina and his ministers came to the place where the Buddha was waiting for them. When they saw the Buddha, with six-coloured rays radiating from his body, they approached the Buddha and paid homage to him. The Buddha then delivered a discourse to them. After listening to the discourse the king and all his ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition, and they asked the Buddha to permit them to join the Order. The Buddha, reflecting on their past and finding that they had made offerings of yellow robes in a past existence, said to them, “Ehi bhikkhu”, and they all became bhikkhus.

Meanwhile, Queen Anoja, learning about the king's departure for Savatthi, sent for the wives of the one thousand ministers, and together with them followed the king's trail. They too came to the place where the Buddha was and seeing the Buddha with a halo of six colours, paid homage to him. All this time, the Buddha by exercising his supernormal power had made the king and his ministers invisible so that their wives did not see them. The queen therefore enquired where the king and his ministers were. The Buddha told the queen and her party to wait for a while and that the king would soon come with his ministers. The Buddha then delivered another discourse; at the end of this discourse the king and his ministers attained arahatship; the queen and the wives of the ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition. At that instant, the queen and her party saw the newly admitted bhikkhus and recognized them as their former husbands.

The ladies also asked permission from the Buddha to enter the Order of Bhikkhunis; so they were directed to go ahead to Savatthi. There they entered the Order and very soon they also attained arahatship. The Buddha then returned to the Jetavana monastery accompanied by one thousand bhikkhus.

At the Jetavana monastery, Thera Mahakappina while resting during the night or during the day would often say, “Oh, what happiness!” (Aho Sukham). The bhikkhus, hearing him saying this so many times a day told the Buddha about it. To them the Buddha replied, “My son Kappina having had the taste of the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; he is saying these words of exultation repeatedly with reference to Nibbana.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 79: He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas).

The Story of Samanera Pandita

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (80) of this book, with reference to Samanera Pandita.

Pandita was a young son of a rich man of Savatthi. He became a samanera at the age of seven. On the eighth day after becoming a samanera, as he was following Thera Sariputta on an alms-round, he saw some farmers channeling water into their fields and asked the thera, “Can water which has no consciousness be guided to wherever one wishes ?” The thera replied, “Yes, it can be guided to wherever one wishes.” As they continued on their way, the samanera next saw some fletchers heating their arrows with fire and straightening them. Further on, he came across some carpenters cutting, sawing and planing timber to make it into things like cart-wheels. Then he pondered, “If water which is without consciousness can be guided to wherever one desires, if a crooked bamboo which is without consciousness can be straightened, and if timber which is without consciousness can be made into useful things, why should I, having consciousness, be unable to tame my mind and practise Tranquillity and Insight Meditation?”

Then and there he asked permission from the thera and returned to his own room in the monastery. There he ardently and diligently practised meditation, contemplating the body. Sakka and the devas also helped him in his meditation by keeping the monastery and its precincts very quiet and still. Before meal time Samanera Pandita attained Anagami Fruition.

At that time Thera Sariputta was bringing food to the samanera. The Buddha saw with his supernormal power that Samanera Pandita had attained Anagami Fruition and also that if he continued to practise meditation he would soon attain arahatship. So the Buddha decided to stop Sariputta from entering the room, where the samanera was. The Buddha went to the door and kept Sariputta engaged by putting some questions to him. While the conversation was taking place, the samanera attained arahatship. Thus, the samanera attained arahatship on the eighth day after becoming a novice.

In this connection, the Buddha said to the bhikkhus of the monastery, “When one is earnestly practising the Dhamma, even Sakka and the devas give protection and keep guard; I myself have kept Thera Sariputta engaged at the door so that Samanera Pandita should not be disturbed. The samanera, having seen the farmers irrigating their fields, the fletchers straightening their arrows, and carpenters making cart-wheels and other things, tames his mind and practises the dhamma; he has now become an arahat.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 80: Farmers (lit., makers of irrigation canals) channel the water; fletchers straighten the arrow; carpenters work the timber; the Wise tame themselves.

The Story of Thera Lakundaka Bhaddiya

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (81) of this book, with reference to Thera Bhaddiya.

Bhaddiya was one of the bhikkhus staying at the Jetavana monastery. Because of his short stature he was known as Lakundaka (the dwarf) to other bhikkhus. Lakundaka Bhaddiya was very good natured; even young bhikkhus would often tease him by pulling his nose or his ear, or by patting him on his head. Very often they would jokingly say, “Uncle, how are you? Are you happy, or are you bored with your life here as a bhikkhu?”, etc. Lakundaka Bhaddiya never retaliated in anger, or abused them; in fact, even in his heart he did not get angry with them.

When told about the patience of Lakundaka Bhaddiya, the Buddha said, “An arahat never loses his temper, he has no desire to speak harshly or to think ill of others. He is like a mountain of solid rock; as a solid rock is unshaken, so also, an arahat is unperturbed by scorn or by praise.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 81: As a mountain of rock is unshaken by wind, so also, the wise are unperturbed by blame or by praise.

The Story of Kanamata

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (82) of this book, with reference to the mother of Kana, Kanamata.

Kanamata was a devoted lay disciple of the Buddha. Her daughter Kana was married to a man from another village. As Kana had been on a visit to her mother for some time, her husband sent a message for her to come home. Her mother told her to wait for one more day as she wanted to send along some sweetmeats with her for her husband. The next day, Kanamata made some sweetmeats, but when four bhikkhus stood at her door for alms, she offered some to them. The four bhikkhus told other bhikkhus about the sweetmeats from Kanamata's house and they also came to stand at the door of Kanamata, as a devotee of the Buddha and his disciples, offered her sweetmeats to the bhikkhus as they came in, one after another. The result was that in the end there was none left for Kana and she did not go home on that day. The same thing happened on the next two days; her mother made some sweetmeats, the bhikkhus stood at her door, she offered her sweetmeats to the bhikkhus, there was nothing left for her daughter to take home, and her daughter did not go home. On the third day, for the third time, her husband sent her a message, which was also an ultimatum stating that if she failed to come home the next day, he would take another wife. But on the next day also Kana was unable to go home because her mother offered all her sweetmeats to the bhikkhus. Kana's husband then took another wife and Kana became very bitter towards the bhikkhus. She used to abuse all bhikkhus so much so that the bhikkhus kept away from the house of Kanamata.

The Buddha heard about Kana and went to the house of Kanamata; there Kanamata offered him some rice gruel. After the meal, the Buddha sent for Kana and asked her, “Did my bhikkhus take what was given them or what was not given them ?” Kana answered that the bhikkhus had taken only what was given them, and then added, “They were not in the wrong; only I was in the wrong.” Thus, she owned up her fault and she also paid homage to the Buddha. The Buddha then gave a discourse. At the end of the discourse, Kana attained Sotapatti Fruition.

On the way back to the monastery, the Buddha met King Pasenadi of Kosala. On being told about Kana and her bitter attitude towards the bhikkhus, King Pasenadi asked the Buddha whether he had been able to teach her the Dhamma and, make her see the Truth (Dhamma). The Buddha replied, “Yes, I have taught her the Dhamma, and I have also made her rich in her next existence.” Then the king promised the Buddha that he would make Kana rich even in this existence. The king then sent his men with a palanquin to fetch Kana. When she arrived, the king announced to his ministers, “Whoever can keep my daughter Kana in comfort may take her.” One of the ministers volunteered to adopt Kana as his daughter, gave her all his wealth, and said to her, “You may give in charity as much as you like.” Everyday, Kana made offerings to the bhikkhus at the four city-gates. When told about Kana giving generously in charity, the Buddha said, “Bhikkhus, the mind of Kana which was foggy and muddled was made clear and calm by my words.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 82: Like a lake which is deep, clear and calm, the wise after listening to the Teaching (Dhamma) become serene.

The Story of Five Hundred Bhikkhus

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (83) of this book, with reference to five hundred bhikkhus.

At the request of a brahmin from Veranja, the Buddha was, on one occasion, staying at Veranja with five hundred bhikkhus. While they were at Veranja, the brahmin failed to look after them. The people of Varanja, who were then facing a famine, could offer very little to the bhikkhus when they went on their rounds for alms-food. In spite of all these hardships, the bhikkhus were not disheartened; they were quite contented with the small amount of shrivelled grain which the horse-traders offered them daily. At the end of the vasa, after informing the brahmin from Veranja, the Buddha returned to the Jetavana monastery, accompanied by the five hundred bhikkhus. The people of Savatthi welcomed them back with choice food of all kinds.

A group of people living with the bhikkhus, eating whatever was left over by the bhikkhus, ate greedily like true gluttons and went to sleep after their meals. On waking up, they were shouting, singing and dancing, thus making themselves a thorough nuisance. When the Buddha came in the evening to the congregation of bhikkhus, they reported to him about the behaviour of those unruly persons, and said, “These people living on the leftovers were quite decent and well-behaved when all of us were facing hardship and famine in Veranja. Now that they have enough good food they are going about shouting, singing and dancing, and thus make themselves a thorough nuisance. The bhikkhus, however, behave themselves here just as they were in Veranja”.

To them the Buddha replied, “It is in the nature of the foolish to be full of sorrow and feel depressed when things go wrong, and to be full of gladness and feel elated when things go well. The wise, however, can withstand the ups and downs of life.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 83: Indeed, the virtuous give up all (i.e., attachment to the five khandhas, etc.); the virtuous (lit., the tranquil) do not talk with sensual desire; when faced with joy or sorrow, the wise do not show elation or depression.

The Story of Thera Dhammika

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (84) of this book, with reference to Thera Dhammika.

Dhammika lived in Savatthi with his wife. One day, he told his pregnant wife that he wished to become a bhikkhu; his wife pleaded with him to wait until after the birth of their child. When the child was born, he again requested his wife to let him go; again, she pleaded with him to wait until the child could walk. Then Dhammika thought to himself, “It will be useless for me to ask my wife for her approval to join the Order; I shall work for my own liberation.” Having made a firm decision, he left his house to become a bhikkhu. He took a subject of meditation from the Buddha and practised meditation ardently and diligently and soon became an arahat.

Some years later, he visited his house in order to teach the Dhamma to his son and his wife. His son entered the Order and he too attained arahatship. The wife then thought, “Now that both my husband and my son have left the house, I'd better leave it, too.” With this thought she left the house and became a bhikkhuni; eventually, she too attained arahatship.

At the congregation of the bhikkhus, the Buddha was told how Dhammika became a bhikkhu and attained arahatship, and how through him his son and his wife also attained arahatship. To them the Buddha said, “Bhikkhus, a wise man does not wish for wealth and prosperity by doing evil, whether it is for his own sake or for the sake of others. He only works for his own liberation from the round of rebirths (samsara) by comprehending the Dhamma and living according to the Dhamma.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 84: For his own sake or for the sake of others, he does no evil; nor does he wish for sons and daughters or for wealth or for a kingdom by doing evil; nor does he wish for success by unfair means; such a one is indeed virtuous, wise and just.

The Story of Dhamma Listeners

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses. (85) and (86) of this book, with reference to a congregation of people who had come to listen to a religious discourse in Savatthi.

On one occasion, a group of people from Savatthi made special offerings to the bhikkhus collectively and they arranged for some bhikkhus to deliver discourses throughout the night, in their locality. Many in the audience could not sit up the whole night and they returned to their homes early; some sat through the night, but most of the time they were drowsy and half-asleep. There were only a few who listened attentively to the discourses.

At dawn, when the bhikkhus told the Buddha about what happened the previous night, he replied, “Most people are attached to this world; only a very few reach the other shore (Nibbana).”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 85: Few among men reach the other shore (Nibbana); all the others only run up and down on this shore.

Verse 86: But those who practise according to the well-expounded Dhamma will reach the other shore (Nibbana), having passed the realm of Death (i.e., samsara), very difficult as it is to cross.

The Story of Five Hundred Visiting Bhikkhus

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (87), (88) and (89) of this book, with reference to five hundred visiting bhikkhus.

Five hundred bhikkhus who had spent the vassa in Kosala came to pay homage to the Buddha at the Jetavana monastery, at the end of the vassa.

The Buddha uttered the following three verses to suit their various temperaments:

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verses 87 & 88: The man of wisdom, leaving the home of craving and having Nibbana as his goal, should give up dark, evil ways and cultivate pure, good ones. He should seek great delight in solitude, detachment and Nibbana, which an ordinary man finds so difficult to enjoy. He should also give up sensual pleasures, and clinging to nothing, should cleanse himself of all impurities of the mind.

Verse 89: Those, with mind well-developed in the seven Factors of Enlightenment (bojjhanga), having rid themselves of all craving, rejoice in their abandonment of attachment. Such men, with all moral intoxicants eradicated, and powerful (with the light of Arahatta Magganana), have realized Nibbana in this world (i.e., with Khandha aggregates remaining).

End of Chapter Six: The Wise (Panditavagga)

Notes

1.

anusaseyya: to give advice in advance; also to give advice repeatedly.

2.

tiramevanudhavati: tiram + eva + anudhavati: shore + only this + run up and down: according to the Commentary 'only this shore' in this context means sakkayaditthi (ego belief).

3.

paramessanti: param + essanti: the other shore + will reach. The other or opposite shore is metaphorically used for Nibbana.

4.

maccudheyyam: the realm of Death (or samsara, round of rebirths).

5.

oka anakamagamma; lit., having gone from home to the homeless. In this context interpreted as leaving the seat of craving and having Nibbana as a goal.

5a.

viveke: solitude, detachment, Nibbana.

6.

viveke: solitude, detachment, Nibbana.

7.

akincano: lit., having nothing; clinging to nothing. (The term kincana may include any of the kilesas or defilements such as passion, ill will, ignorance, etc; it also means clinging or attachment to the world.)

8.

cittaklesehi: citta kilesa: impurities of the mind.

9.

sambodhiyangesu: sambojjhanga: the Factors of Enlightenment or requisites for attaining Magga Insight.

10.

khinasava: one in whom human passions are extinguished; an arahat.

11.

jutimanta: one endowed with the power of Arahatta Magganana.

12.

te loke parinibbuta: the realization of Nibbana in the realm of the five aggregates (khandhas), or in other words, in this world. But according to the Commentary, in this context, both Sa-upadisesa and Anupadisesa Nibbana are meant. Sa-upadisesa or Kilesa Nibbana is Nibbana with groups of existence or khandhas remaining; it is realized by an arahat on the attainment of arahatship. Anupadisesa or Khandha Nibbana is Nibbana without groups of existence or khandhas remaining. It takes place on the death of an arahat.

13.

anusaseyya: to give advice in advance; also to give advice repeatedly.

14.

anusaseyya: to give advice in advance; also to give advice repeatedly.

15.

anusaseyya: to give advice in advance; also to give advice repeatedly.


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Anumodana puñña kusala!



Help | About | Contact | Scope of the Dhamma gift | Collaboration
Anumodana puñña kusala!

random_page.txt · Last modified: 2022/08/15 15:07 by Johann